RSS
ClickBank1


Broadway and Off Broadway Theatres – M to Z









Broadway and Off Broadway Theatres – M to Z
(An Alphabetical Listing)

Your help with the listings would very much be appreciated, as I live in Toronto, Canada and do not have access to places like the New York Public Library or The Lincoln Centre Library for the Performing Arts.

If you see errors, additions, duplications or anything pertinent to this listing, please drop me a line:

This website was established on Link Opp May 15, 1999. As of May 15, 2013, we will celebrate our 14th year!!!

As of Dec 5/06 – World-Theatres moved to server cPanel X.

As of September/13 the site is receiving over 10,000 visitors a month! Thank you very much for your support!

The site is updated almost daily and requires a multitude of reference materials, as well as constant promotion worldwide. If you wish to donate to the materials and maintenance of this site, your kindness would be most appreciated.

Break a leg!

Clair Sedore, Editor





Or By Letter If You Wish

Protected by Copyscape Web Copyright Protection Software

  • BROADWAY, OFF BROADWAY AND OFF-OFF BROADWAY THEATRES – M to Z

    (An Alphabetical Listing)


    My only hope is that you enjoy this site, and if you have further information, or see inaccuracies, I would be most appreciative of new information. This site has been a labour of great love, albeit very labour-intensive.

    If you see errors, additions, duplications or anything pertinent to this listing, please drop me a line:

    Quick Listing of New York Theatre and Concert Hall Addresses

    QUICK GUIDE – M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z;

    SITE UPDATED December 21, 2014



    M

    Mabou Mines – avant garde ensemble founded 1970 – specialized in
    original works – group travelled widely – see La Mama

    Macomba – E 39th Street – 1940s nightspot
    Madam Walker’s House & Beauty Salon – Harlem

    Madhattan Room – Hotel Pennsylvania – 1930s nightspot

    Madison Square – 7th Avenue & 32nd Street – Hazel Kirke 1880

    Madison Square Garden – evolved from old passenger station –
    converted to concert hall known as Gilmore’s Garden from Madison to 4th Ave &
    26th & 27th – 1880 demolished, new Madison Square Garden built – demolished 1890
    & new structure with theatre on ground floor was erected, called Garden Theatre
    at Madison & 27th St area – building torn down and New York Life Insurance
    erected on site; new Madison Square Theatre built on 8th Ave & 50th St and
    survived for 43 years before moving to site of Pennsyvania Railroad Station in
    1968 – singers engaged at 1.00 per night to sing before the fights – Liberace;
    2nd – Madison Square Theatre (NYC) – see Fifth Avenue Theatre, Hoyt’s Theatre –
    South side of 24th Street West of Broadway (between 5th & Madison (688 seats) –
    built 1880 for use as repertory house on site of Daly’s first 5th Avenue Theatre
    – Hazel Kirke 1880 (ran nearly 2 years) – 1891 renamed Hoyt’s Theatre – On The
    Quiet 1901 – demolished 1908; 3rd – Madison Square Garden Theatre (Hoyt’s
    Theatre) (NYC) – 7th Avenue & 34th St.- built 1879 on site of 5th Avenue Theatre
    (700) – demolished in 1908 – rebuilt with 5,000 seats – Hazel Kirke 1880 (486),
    Held By the Enemy 1886 (70), Rajah or Wyncot’s Ward 1883 (190), Trip to
    Chinatown or An Idyl of San Francisco 1891 (657), Young Mrs. Withrop 1882 (190),
    Esmeralda 1881 (350), Beau Brummell 1890 (150), Alabama 1891 (37); home to 10
    years of A Christmas Carol (Jim Dale 2003 (final one); Past Christmas misers
    have included F. Murray Abraham (2002), Tim Curry (2001), Frank Langella (2000),
    Tony Roberts (1999), Roger Daltrey (1998), Hal Linden & Roddy McDowall (1997),
    Tony Randall (1996), Terrence Mann (1995) and Walter Charles (1994)- 2005 –
    owners of Madison Square Garden in talks to build its fifth incarnation, a block
    west of its current home atop Pennsylvania Station – would be demolished and
    replaced by skyscrapers containing a mix of apartments, offices and stores – In
    1874, P. T. Barnum opened Barnum’s Monster Classical and Geological Hippodrome
    in an old train depot at Madison Avenue and 26th Street – in 1876 renamed
    Gilmore’s Garden. Then, in 1879, William H. Vanderbilt took control of the
    building and christened it Madison Square Garden – knocked down in 1889,
    replaced with entertainment hall with country’s largest auditorium, a concert
    hall and cabaret, home to the National Horse Show, Westminster Kennel Club show,
    boxing, circuses, rodeos – 1925, Garden II was demolished to make way for the
    headquarters of New York Life Insurance – new Garden opened uptown, at Eighth
    Avenue and 50th Street, becoming famous for boxing, basketball and the New York
    Knicks. Sonja Henie took her Hollywood Ice Revue there in 1938. (It is now the
    site of the Worldwide Plaza office tower) – It was replaced in 1968 by the
    current Garden, a circular arena atop Pennsylvania Station – 19,000 seats –
    record holders – Billy Joel (11 sell-out Garden Shows, maybe 12 2006); Bruce
    Springsteen (10 sell-out Garden Shows) ; May 2007 became known as WaMu Theatre
    (NYC); 4th – Madison Square Theatre – – see Fifth Avenue Theatre, Madison Square
    Garden Theatre

    Maidman Theatre – Greenwich Village – Pocket Watch; Streets of New
    York 1963

    Main Stage Theatre – see Queens Theatre in the Park

    Maisonette Russe – 1930s nightspot

    Majestic Theatre – Brooklyn – Fulton Street near Ormond Place

    Majestic Theatre
    – 1903 – 5 Columbus Circle – fronting 58th and 59th Street – 1354 seats –
    opening Wizard of Oz starring Fred Stone (293 perf), Dave Montgomery 1903 (293),
    Babes in Toyland 1903 (192); Top of the World; Bandanna Land; 1911 became Park
    Theatre – Quaker Girl 1911; Pygmalion (Mrs. Patrick Campbell) 1914; Merry Wives
    of Windsor (Constance Collier, Herbert Tree) 1917 – Louie the 14th (Romberg)
    (Leon Errol and Ethel Shutte) (9 mos); Sing Out Sweet Land (Alfred Drake, Burl
    Ives) 1944 – 1922 became Minsky’s Park Music Hall; 1923 it became Cosmopolitan –
    in 1931 it became a film and vaudeville house called Cosmo Varieties – 1934
    became The Theatre of Young America – 1935 became The Park once again – renamed
    the International in 1944 – 1945 became the Columbus Circle – Hamlet (Maurice
    Evans) – and changed to International – 1949 became NBC studios “Your Show of
    Shows,” – demolished June 1954 for new convention center; 2nd Majestic –

    Majestic Theatre
    - 245 West 44th St. (Shubert-1,645 seats)- opened
    1927 with ephemeral production Rufus LaMaire’s Affairs 1927; and in 1928 John
    Gielgud made lst N.Y. appearance in The Patriot (8 perf) – Considered Broadway’s
    best theatre with a history of highly successful hit musicals – Pardon My
    English 1932; Stars in Your Eyes 1939; Yokel Boy (Buddy Ebsen) 1939 (208);
    Carousel 1945 (890), Allegro 1947 (315); South Pacific 1949 (1925), Me and
    Juliet 1953 (358); Fanny 1954 (888); By the Beautiful Sea (Shirley Booth) 1954;
    Happy Hunting 1956; Music Man (Robert Preston,Barbara Cook) 1957 (1375), Camelot
    (Richard Burton,Julie Andrews,Robert Goulet,Roddy McDowell,Mel D’owd) 1960
    (873), Jennie 1963; Golden Boy 1964 (569); Anyone Can Whistle (Angela
    Lansbury,Lee Remick) 1964 (9); Sugar (Tony Roberts,Robert Morse,Elaine Joyce)
    1972 (505); Mack and Mabel (Bernadette Peters,Robert Preston) 1974 (65); Wiz
    1975 (1672); I Remember Mama (Liv Ullmann) 1979 (108), Act (Liza Minnelli) 1977,
    Ballroom 1978; Harry Blackstone 1980; 42nd Street 1981; First Monday in October,
    Most Happy Fella, *Phantom of the Opera (Michael Crawford,Sarah Brightman) (1/88
    still running – 4689); 3rd Majestic – 5 Columbus Circle – opened as Cosmopolitan
    in 1903 – 1911 renamed Park – 1923-1944 used as cinema – renamed International
    (1946-1949); then tv studio – demolished 1954 and New York Coliseum built on
    site; 4th Majestic –

    Majestic Theatre
    Brooklyn

    Major Theatre – closed

    Mama Rose’s – 219 Second Avenue (upstairs) – new cabaret venue June 2003

    Mama’s Turn – opening in July/04 – will be located on the Upper West Side,
    in the 70s – in the area of the original BROADWAY BABY piano bar/cabaret that
    was situated on Amsterdam Avenue at 72nd Street. It will be called MAMA’S TURN,
    and the space will have a large piano bar with cabaret room upstairs that will
    seat close to 100 patrons

    Manhattan Casino – interracial drag costume balls

    Manhattan Center – 311 West 34th
    Street – 1906 – see Hammerstein’s Ballroom, Manhattan Opera –

    *Manhattan
    Class Company Theater
    – 120 West 28th St (between 6th & 7th Aves)-
    Glory of Living 2001

    *Manhattan Ensemble
    Theatre
    - 55 Mercer Street (140 seats)

    Manhattan Music Hall – see Hammerstein’s Theatre

    Manhattan Nightclub – see Hammertstein’s Theatre

    Manhattan 1 & 2 – closed & demolished

    Manhattan Opera – 311 West 34th Street – 1906 – see Manhattan Center –
    Manhattan Opera Company opened here; 2nd – Manhattan Opera House – 1906 –
    competed with Met until 1910; 3rd –
    Manhattan Opera House
    (NYC) – see Koster & Bial’s New Music Hall, Hammerstein’s – built 1892 on 34th
    Street West of Broadway – built and owned by Oscar Hammerstein on the site where
    Macy’s is today – Eternal Road (Lotte Lenya) 1937

    Manhattan School of Arts and Technology – 132 West 89th Street – see P.S.
    166 and Richard Rodgers School of Arts and Technology

    Manhattan Theatre – 6th Avenue and 33rd Street, see Standard Theatre
    – Way Down East 1898 (152), Leah Kleschna (Mrs. Fiske) 1904 (131) – demolished
    1909; 2nd – Manhattan Theatre (NYC) – see Eagle Theatre – 1697 Broadway between
    53rd and 54th – opened 1927 as Hammerstein’s Theatre – 1931 renamed Manhattan –
    1934 became Billy Rose Music-Hall and later Manhattan Music Hall – renamed Ed
    Sullivan Theatre 1967; 2nd Manhattan Theatre – from 1897 to 1901 Standard
    Theatre was known as Manhattan Theatre, built as Eagle Theatre

    Manhattan I and II – 1969 – 800 seats – Razed, 1995 (c.)

    *Manhattan Theatre Club-
    founded 1970 in old Bohemian National Hall on East 73rd Street in a complex that
    included 3 major stages – moved to 131 West 55th St.(between 6th & 7th Aves)-
    Crimes of the Heart (Mary Beth Hurt) 1980; It’s Only a Play (Joanna
    Gleason,Dorothy Tutin,Christine Baranski) 1986; Eastern Standard – transfers to
    John Golden 1989; Love! Valor! Compassion – 1994 – moved to Walter Kerr in 1995;
    Comic Potential 2000; Wild Party 2000; Class Act 2000 (transferred to Ambassador
    Theatre 2001) Stages I (299 seats) and Stages II (150 seats) – founded in 1970
    and has been located at City Center since 1984 – see Biltmore Theatre – The
    Contractor 1973 (72); Ain’t Misbehavin 1978 (moved to Longacre); Crimes of the
    Heart 1981; It’s Only a Play 1986; Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune
    (Kathy Bates,Kenneth Welsh) 1987 (533); Loman Family Picnic (City Center Stage
    2) 1989; Lips Together,Teeth Apart (City Center) (Nathan Lane,Swoozie
    Kurtz,Christine Baranski) – transfer to Lucille Lortel 1991; Perfect Ganesh (Zoe
    Caldwell,Frances Sternhagen) 1993; Love,Valor,Compassion 1994 (transferred to
    Walter Kerr Theatre); Labor Day 1998; Fuddy Meers 1999; East Is East 1999; Class
    Act 2000; Wild Party 2000 (transferred)

    *Manhattan Theatre
    Source
    – 177 MacDougal Street – houses Playhouse (50 seats) and
    WindowBox Café – can be used as cabaret

    Mansfield Theatre – 256 West 47th St – opened1926 – with Night Duel
    – in 1960 became the Brooks Atkinson – Ladder 1926 (789); Green Pastures 1930
    (640);

    Marble Palace – 561 Broadway – Minstrel Shows 1850s
    Marilyn Monroe Theater – 115 E 15th St (Union Square)

    Mark Hellinger Theatre – 237 West 51st St. – see Hollywood Theatre –
    opened as a cinema in 1930 (Warner Hollywood)- designed by Lamb, 1,600 seats,
    but was soon converted to a playhouse and the name changed, then a showcase film
    theatre in 1930, the Hollywood Theatre – reverted to legitimate theatre in 1934
    – Calling All Stars 1934; name changed to 51st Street Theatre on 2 occasions
    1936 –entrance moved to 51st St – Sweet River (5 perf) – and again in 1940 –
    Romeo and Juliet (Laurence Olivier, Vivien Leigh) – 1949 became the Mark
    Hellinger – Texas L’il Darlin’ 1949; Two on the Aisle 1951; Three Wishes for
    Jamie 1952; Hazel Flagg 1953; Girl in Pink Tights 1954; Ankles Aweigh 1955;
    Plain and Fancy 1955 (461), My Fair Lady (Rex Harrison,Julie Andrews,Cathleen
    Nesbitt,Stanley Holloway) 1956 (2717), Fade Out Fade In (Carol Burnett) 1964; On
    a Clear Day You Can See Forever (Barbara Harris) 1965, Joyful Noise 1966; Illya
    Darling (Melina Mercouri,Orson Bean) 1967 (319); Coco (Katharine Hepburn) 1969;
    Dear World (Angela Lansbury) 1969; Jesus Christ Superstar 1971 (720), 1600
    Pennsylvania Avenue 1976; Timbuktu 1978 (221); Sugar Babies 1979, Doll’s Life
    1982, film version of A Chorus Line was filmed here – Jesus Christ Superstar
    1971 (720), Sunset (Alexis Smith) 1978; As You Like It, Sugar Babies 1979
    (1208), Utter Glory of Morrissey Hall 1979; A Doll’s Life 1982; Merlin 1983;
    Grind 1985; Rags 1986; Legs Diamond 1988; Tony Awards – now the Times Square
    Church

    Mark Morris Dance Group – 1980 – opened
    in new Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn 2001

    *Marquis
    – 1535 Broadway (45th & 46th) (Nederlander-1,611 seats) – Built in the
    Marriott Marquis Hotel – 3rd floor – inauguration Shirley Bassey & George Kirby;
    Me and My Gal 1986 (George S. Irving,Jane Connell) (1420); Shogun 1990; Nick and
    Nora (Joanna Gleason,Christine Baranski,Barry Bostwick,Debra Monk,Faith Prince)
    1991 (9); Goodbye Girl (Martin Short,Bernadette Peters)1993; Victor Victoria
    (Julie Andrews, Tony Roberts) 1995 (734); Capeman (Ruben Blades) 1997 (68);
    Annie Get Your Gun (Bernadette Peters,Tom Wopat/Cheryl Ladd)1999; Thoroughly
    Modern Millie (Sutton Foster, Leslie Uggams, Delta Burke) 2003; Cry Baby 2008; –
    three treasured theatres bit the dust for this complex

    *Martin
    Beck
    – 302 West 45th St. (Jujamcyn-1,302 seats) (Being renamed the Al
    Hirschfield Theatre on June 21, 2003, the artist’s 100th birthday) – Built in
    1924 for a vaudeville showman – Madame Pompadour 1924; Shanghai Gesture 1926
    (331); Wings Over Europe 1928; Dynamo 1929 (50), Apple Cart (Claude Rains) 1930
    (11 weeks); Hotel Universe (Ruth Gordon,Franchot Tone) 1930 (10 weeks);
    Winterset 1935 (195), High Tor 1937 (171), Reunion in Vienna 1931 (264), Cabin
    in the Sky (Ethel Waters,Katharine Dunham) 1940 (156), Watch on the Rhine 1941
    (378),The Army Play-by-Play 1943 (40); This Foolish Notion (Tallulah Bankhead)
    1945 (13 weeks); Iceman Cometh 1946 (136), St. Louis Woman (Pearl Bailey) 1946
    (113); Barefoot Boy With Cheek (Red Buttons,Nancy Walker) 1947; Rose Tattoo 1951
    (306), Teahouse of the August Moon 1953 (1027), Crucible (Madeleine Sherwood,E.G.
    Marshall) 1953 (197); Major Barbara(Glynis Johns,Eli Wallach,Corneilia Otis
    Skinner,Burgess Meredith) 1956 (232); Candide (Barbara Cook) 1956 (73); Mister
    Johnson (Earle Hyman) 1956 (44); Orpheus Descending (Maureen Stapleton,Cliff
    Robertson) 1957 (68); Sweet Bird of Youth (Geraldine Page,Paul Newman,Rip
    Torn)1959 (375), Bye Bye Birdie 1960 (607); Beg Borrow or Steal (Estelle
    Parsons,Eddie Bracken,Betty Garrick,Larry Parks) 1960 (5); Happiest Girl in the
    World 1961; Milk and Honey 1961 (541), Ballad of a Sad Cafe (Colleen
    Dewhurst,Roscoe Lee Browne,Michael Dunn) 1963 (123); I Had a Ball (Buddy
    Hackett) 1964; Physicists (Jessica Tandy,Hume Cronyn) 1964 (55); Drat the Cat
    1965; Marat/Sade 1965; Delicate Balance (Jessica Tandy,Hume Cronyn,Rosemary
    Murphy,Carmen Mathews,Marian Seldes,Henderson Forsythe) 1966; Hallelujah Baby
    (Leslie Uggams) 1967 (293); Grass Harp 1971; All Over (John Gielgud,Jessica
    Tandy,Colleen Dewhurst) 1971 (42); Habeas Corpus 1975; Dracula 1977 (revival
    925), Onward Victoria 1980; Bring Back Birdie 1981; Little Foxes (Elizabeth
    Taylor,Maureen Stapleton) 1981; Come Back to the 5 and Dime,Jimmy Dean, Jimmy
    Dean (Sandy Dennis,Cher,Karen Black,Kathy Bates) 1982 (52); Rink (Liza
    Minnelli,Chita Rivera) 1984, Into the Woods (Bernadette Peters,Joanna
    Gleason,Barbara Bryne) 1987 (765), Grand Hotel:The Musical (Tommy Tune) 1989
    (1018), Guys and Dolls (Nathan Lane,Faith Prince,Peter Gallagher) – revival 1992
    (over 800 performances ), Moon Over Buffalo (Carol Burnett) 1995 (308); Habeus
    Corpus, Happy End, Saturday Sunday Monday, Strange Interlude; Annie (revival
    Nell Carter) 1997 (238); revival Sound of Music (Rebecca Luke, later Richard
    Chamberlain 1998 (553); Man of La Mancha (Brian Stokes Mitchell) 2002 (6 months)

    Martinique Theatre – Crucible 1958 (571), Six Characters in Search of
    an Author 1963 (529)

    *Martin R.
    Kaufman Theater
    – 534 West 42nd St. (between 10th & 11th Aves) (97
    seats)

    Martinique Theatre – Kittiwake Island 1960; All in Love 1963;
    Othello (James Earl Jones) 1964 (224); In White America (Gloria Foster) – now
    defunct

    Martinson Hall – see Public Theatre

    Marymount Manhattan Theatre – housed within Marymount Manhattan
    College on Upper East Side – Uncommon Women and Others (Jill Eikenberry,Glenn
    Close,Swoosie Kurtz) 1977 (22); Getting Out 1978 (22), Scribes – demolished

    Masque Theatre – see John Golden – Post Road 1934 (212); Mann Ist
    Mann 1962 (175)

    Master Theatre – 300 seats – Wish You Were Here (1987) ; Too Many Girls (1987) ;Take Me Along (1987) ; Kismet (1987) ;The Pajama Game (1986) ;Funny Girl (1986) ;Girl Crazy (1986) ; They’re Playing Our Song (1986) ;She Loves Me (1985) ;A Little Night Music (1985) ;Very Warm for May (1985) ;Promises, Promises (1983) ;Chess (1992) ;Nymph Errant (1982) ;Street Scene (1982) ;Ace o’ Diamonds (1981);Seesaw (1981) ;Sea Dream (1981) ;Canterbury Tales (1979) ;On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (1979) ;Company (1978) ;Gay Divorce (1978) ;2 (1978) ;Allegro (1978) ;Follies (1976) ;Maggie Flynn (1976) ;Tenderloin (1975) ;Do I Hear a Waltz? (1975) ; Best Foot Forward (1975) ;Out of this World (1973) ;One for the Money, Etc. (1972) ;Now Is the Time for All Good Men (1971) ;Ruddigore (1971) ;Little Mary Sunshine (1970) ;Greenwillow (1970) ;Babes in Arms (1967) ;Trouble in Tahiti (1965) ;By Jupiter (1965) ;Ernest in Love (1964) ;The Beggar’s Opera (1964) ;Seventeen (1962) ;Paint Your Wagon (1962)
    Masterworks Theater Company
    Eric Krebs and Christopher Scott announced the creation of a new Equity theatre company, which will focus on repertoire from the classical theatre – plays to be staged at 47th Street Theater (304 West 47th Street – first season will feature The Glass Menagerie in May 2015, followed by S A Midsummer Night’s Dream in June/15

    *Maverick
    Theatre
    - 307 West 26th St – former home of the American Jewish
    Theatre – Chelsea – founded in 1996

    Mayfair Theatre(Embassy, DeMille – 1,736 seats – Fly Blackbird
    1962; Ballad For Bimshire 1963; Dance With Me – boarded up – Gutted 2007, to be
    retail

    Maxine Elliott’s – 1908 – 109 West 39th Street East of Broadway (900
    seats) – surrounded by the Casino, Empire, Abbeys, Princess, Nazimovas and
    Comedy Theatres – opened with Chaperon starring Maxine Elliott (6 weeks);
    Passing of the Third Floor Back 1909 (first success); Gamblers 1910; Playboy of
    the Western World (Abbey Theatre) – caused riot in 1911; See America First (Cole
    Porter) 1916; Eyes of Youth 1917 (414), Romance 1913 (160), Mountain Man (Sidney
    Blackmer) 1921 (163); Rain 1922 (648), Coquette 1927 (366); Coquette 1919; Art
    and Mrs. Bottle (Katherine Hepburn) 1930; Constant Wife (Ethel Barrymore); Rain
    (Jeanne Eagels); Coquette (Helen Hayes); Children’s Hour (Ann Revere) 1934
    (691), Horse Eats Hat 1936; Separate Rooms 1940 (613); Ballet Joos 1941 – CBS
    produced Toast of the Town with Ed Sullivan from this theatre – closed theatre
    in 1959 – demolished in 1960

    Max’s Kansas City – notorious
    bar with three floors – infamous stars showed up here – Cockettes, Warhol crowd,
    Wayne/Jane County

    *MCC Theatre – 120 West
    28th St.- Wit 1998 (75) – then moved to Union Square (545)- currently without a
    home and using Theatre Row – 20th Anniversary March 13/06 – the 25-year-old Off-Broadway company which currently calls the Lucille Lortel Theatre in the West Village home, is aiming to move to a new 25,000 square foot permanent residence by the 2013-2014 season – will relocate MCC Theater to midtown’s Archstone Clinton building, located at West 52nd Street on 10th Avenue to include a 249-seat main stage theatre and a 99-seat flexible black box space. MCC Theater currently rents the 299-seat Lortel, located on Christopher Street – administrative offices are located on 42nd Street

    McElfatrick, J.B., and Company – leading firm of theatrical architects
    early 1900s – New York houses include Broadway, Empire, Hudson, Music Hall
    (later the New York), Lyric (later the Criterion), Republic, Victoria and
    Wallacks Theatres – designed more than 100 theatres across the country

    *McGinn-Cazale
    Theatre
    – 2162 Broadway (fourth floor) & 76th – 108 seats – see also
    Promenade Theatre (downstairs) – named after two actors who died much too soon –
    Walter McGinn (1936-1977) (Canterbury Tales,Here’s Where I Belong, Bobby
    Deerfield, Dog Day Afternoon, Deadliest Season, Kill Me If You Can), and John
    Cazale (1935-1978) (Deer Hunter, Conversation, Godfather) – previously home to
    Second Stage – new home of Vital Theatre Company November 2004

    McHales’s Bar – 750 8th Avenue at 46th – theatrical establishment frequented by Broadway’s tech folk – shut on
    January 16/06 to become high rise

    McKittrick Hotel – 530 West 27th Street – new off-Broadway venue – formerly a Chelsea nightclub – six-floor Chelsea warehouse space – Sleep No More 2011;

    Mecca Auditorium – 1926 – 1,947 seats -Razed, 1945 (c.) No For An
    Answer 1941;

    Mechanics’ Social Hall – 472 Broadway – Christie’s Minstrels 1847 &
    1864 (almost 10 years) – J. Reese Europe killed here – later became Butler’s
    American Theatre

    Medicine Show – see Ensemble Studio Theatre; 2 – Medicine Shows –
    early years of 19th Century and ran from 1840s to beginning of 20th Century –
    offerings of patent medicines – one man shows originally but were soon enlarged

    Merce Cunningham Dance Company – as of Dec 31/11, the company founded in 1953 will disband – Mr. Cunningham who died in 2009, was for 50 years the partner of musician John Cage, they will be greatly missed on the dance scene

    Mercer Arts Center – 1973 the 1870 Broadway Hotel collapsed taking with it 8 off broadway and off-off broadway theater spaces known as Mercer Arts Center – El Grande de Coca Cola 1973 (1114)

    Mercer-Hansberry Theatre – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (William
    Devane) 1971 (1025)

    Mercer-O’Casey Theatre – Effect of the Gamma Rays (Sada
    Thompson,Swoosie Kurtz) 1970 (819); Exchange 1970; Doctor Selavy’s Magic Theatre
    1972; Hark 1972

    Mercury Lounge – rock club – Houston St – 250 capacity

    Mercury Theatre – founded by Orson Welles and John Houseman as
    repertory company in 1937 – used Comedy Theatre – Julius Caesar (Orson Welles)
    1937 (157);Shoemaker’s Holiday 1938 – group collapsed in 1938

    Mermaid Theatre – Greenwich Village – Pocket Watch

    Merry Go-Round – 49 E 54th St – 1930s nightspot

    Metro
    Playhouse
    - 220 East Fourth Street – see Connelly

    Metropol. Opera – 1880 opera house – 3,600 seats – 1880 – Razed, 1963

    Metropole – 1950s nightspot

    Metropolis – Mabel Mercer; Metropolis, Bronx – 1897 – 1,600 seats – Razed,
    1940s

    Metropolitan Alcazar – 40th and Broadway – built 1880 – demolished
    1930s

    Metropolitan Casino – see Broadway Theatre

    Metropolitan Club – East 60th St – 1890s nightspot

    Metropolitan Concert Hall – 1880 – SW corner of Broadway & 41st St – for a
    time roller rink & exhibition hall – demolished 1888 and Broadway Theatre
    erected on its site – razed 1919 for skyscraper

    Metropolitan Opera House
    – Broadway between 39th & 40th Streets – founded 1883 – rival to NY
    Academy of Music – built as the New Opera House (3,045 seats) – damaged by fire
    in 1892 – endured until Lincoln Centre opened 1966 – original demolished in 1967

    *Metropolitan Playhouse of New
    York
    - 220 East 4th St.(Avenues A & B)

    Metropolitan Room – 34 West
    22nd St (bet 5th & 6th) 9Chelsea)- new cabaret space 2006 – 110 seats – former
    comedy club

    Metropolitan Theatre (see Tripler Hall) – see New York Theatre –
    667-77 Broadway – built on site of Tripler Hall which was burnt down 1854 –
    became circus – 1859 became Winter Garden – 1867 theatre burnt down and not
    rebuilt

    Metro Theatre – West 99th Street- built 1932/33 – year after its
    completion there were 18 movie theatres along Broadway between 59th and 110th
    Streets – closed Jan 26/03 and reopened but maybe only temporarily – was onetime
    porn theatre known as the Midtown

    Mexico’s Gin Mill – 133rd Street – 1920s hotspot

    M. Franconi’s Hippodrome – Broadway and 23rd St – 1853 – torn down
    in 1856 to make way for Fifth Avenue Hotel

    Miami Theater – early 1940s – no information available presently

    Michael
    Schimmel Center for the Arts
    – situated at Pace Uiversity on the
    downtown campus, facing City Hall – box office and Theatre entrance are located
    on Spruce Street, east of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street – new home of
    the National Actors Theatre

    Michael’s Pub – (Renaissance Hotel)- 7th Avenue between 47th and
    48th St. (was 57 East 54th St.) – intimate cabaret – Mel Torme, Woody Allen –
    closed December 98 and now situated at Park Restaurant in Hotel Lombardy, 111
    East 56th Street – Julie Wilson

    Midget Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre, President Theatre

    Midtown – 99th & Broadway – built in 1933 by Boak and Paris –
    demolished

    Midway Theatre - 74th St & Broadway – renamed Warner’s Beacon when opened
    1929

    Mime – never played important role in mainstream American theatre – i.e.
    Marcel Marceau, Mummenshanz

    Mimic Club – 1930s nightspot

    Mimo Club – Harlem nightspot 1940s

    Mind the Gap Theatre

    Miner’s Bowery Theatre – old burlesque theatre in the Houston
    district – Fridays were first amateur nights in burlesque – 1896 – changed name
    to Knickerbockers – Wine, Women and Song

    Miners’ Eighth Avenue
    Theatre
    – 310 8th Avenue above W 26th St – variety theatre – 1881
    destroyed by fire – 1902 rebuilt – ended life as movie house

    Minerva Rooms – 460 Broadway below Grand St

    *Minetta Lane
    Theatre
    - 16 Minetta Lane (Just East of 6th Ave. to West 3rd St.)
    (407) – 1984 – building was a printing company – inaugural production was 3 Guys Naked From the Waist Down (1985), a modest hit that ran half a year –
    Personals 1985; Other
    People’s Money 1989 (990); Jeffrey 1993 (10 months); Cowgirls 1996; Thwak 1999; Balm in Gilead; Pounding Nails in the Floor; Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde; Marvin’s Room; The Last Five Years; Cookin; Talking Heads; My Name is Rachel Corrie; Adding Machine, A Musical; and Garden of Earthly Delights

    Minor Latham Playhouse – Barnard College Campus – 117th Street and
    Broadway

    *Minskoff
    – 1515 Broadway/200 West 45th St. (44th and 45th) (Nederlander-1,710 seats)
    – Opened in 1973 on third floor of 1 Astor Plaza, site of former Astor Hotel
    with Irene (Debbie Reynolds,Patsy Kelly,George S.Irving) revival (604), Clams on
    the Half Shell Revue (Bette Midler) 1975 (67); Rockabye Hamlet 1976; Angel 1978;
    King of Hearts 1978, Dance a Little Closer 1983; Teddy and Alice 1987; Black and
    Blue 1989 (824), Marilyn, West Side Story revival; Tap Dance Kid; Sunset
    Boulevard (Glenn Close,George Hearn) 1994 (977); Scarlet Pimpernel (Christine
    Andreas) 1997 (640) – revised and ran to (772) performances; The Adventures of
    Tom Sawyer (less than 2 weeks) 2001; Dance of the Vampires (Michael Crawford)
    2003 (56); Engelbert Humperdinck; Shirley Bassey; Patti La Belle; and Peter,
    Paul & Mary as well as revivals of Hello, Dolly!; Can-Can; The Pirate of
    Penzance; Sweet Charity; Cabaret; Peter Pan; Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor
    Dreamcoat; and, most recently, Fiddler on the Roof. Other recent shows include
    Saturday Night Fever; Lion King (transferred from New Amsterdam);

    Minsky’s – see New Victory Theatre, Republic – 1931 became Minksys – Phil
    Silvers, Abbott and Costello, Red Buttons, Gypsy Rose Lee, Ann Corio etc. owed
    their careers to Minskys; 2nd – Minsky’s Burlesque – Broadway and 51st Street –
    1930s; 3rd – Minsky’s Oriental Theatre (NYC) – Broadway; 4th – Minsky’s Park
    Music Hall (NYC) – see Majestic Theatre; 5th – 1,000 seat theatre on 6th floor
    of National, which was Yiddish theatre’s most prominent venue – 11 E Houston –
    now a parking lot

    Minstrel Shows – basically started at Bowery Amphitheatre 1843 of Virginia
    Minstrels although blackface performers had been popular for a decade – other
    groups included Ethiopian Serenaders; Mr. Bones; Mr. Tambo; Buckley’s Serenaders;
    Bryant’s Minstrels; Christy Minstels; Ordways Aeolians; San Francisco Minstrels;
    and Wood’s Minstrels – by 1880s it had largely disappeared except for
    Philadelphia where Sanford’s Minstrels and Dumont;s Minstrels kept tradition
    into the 20th century – Park Theatre, Astor Place Opera, Mitchell’s Old Olympic
    Theatre, Niblo’s Garden, Barnum’s Museum – dominated Broadway for nearly 20
    years

    Minton’s Playhouse – Harlem 1940s – has been shuttered for about as long as it had been open – cradle of bebop, where the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk and Charlie Parker jammed into the night.
    Efforts to reopen Minton’s Playhouse on West 118th Street, which first closed in the 1970s, have sputtered –
    Minton’s Playhouse had a brief resurgence several years ago – new owner hopes to add Southern cooking on fine china to the listener’s experience
    Henry Minton, a tenor saxophonist, opened the club in the late 1930s on the first floor of the Cecil Hotel – building became an apartment complex for formerly homeless adults –
    mid-1990s, a group of investors that included Robert De Niro and the restaurateur Drew Nieporent was interested in the Minton’s Playhouse space, as was Quincy Jones. In 2006, the jazz club impresario Earl Spain, after leaving St. Nick’s Pub, reopened Minton’s, only to see it close in 2010

    Mint Theatre Company/a> – 311
    West 43rd St.(between 8th & 9th Aves) (74 seats)- in small office building on
    5th floor – Macbeth (all female) 2000

    Mirage – 125 East 54th Street – 1930s nightclub

    *Miranda Theatre – 259 West 30th St. (66) (7th & 8th)

    Mitchell’s Olympic Theatre – see Olympic – 444 Broadway, between
    Howard & Grand Sts – opened 1839 – former Broadway Theatre – 1852 converted to
    business structure – burned down 1854 – became City Assembly Rooms

    *Mitzi E.
    Newhouse
    – see Lincoln Center (see Vivian Beaumont also) 150 West 65th
    St (Lincoln Centre-299 seats) – originally known as Forum – Streamers 1976 (478), Sing Happy, You’re the
    Top; Waiting for Godot (Robin Williams,Steve Martin,F.Murray Abraham) 1988 (25);
    Mr. Gogol and Mr. Preen (William H. Macy) 1991; Sisters Rosenweig (Jane
    Alexander,Madeline Kahn,Robert Klein,Frances McDormand) 1992 (149)(transferred
    to Ethel Barrymore in 1993); Hello Again 1994; Suburbia 1994; New Brain (Malcolm
    Gets,Kristin Chenoweth,Penny Fuller) 1998; Contact 1999 (transferred to Vivian
    Beaumont);Old Money (John Cullum,Mary Beth Hurt) 2000; Spinning Into Butter
    2000; Bad Friend 2002; Other Desert Cities 2010;

    MMAC Theatre (Manhattan Movement and Arts Center) – 248 W 60th St (bet Amsterdam & 11th Ave) – new venue 2011
    Mocambo – famous New York nightspot – Will Mastin Trio starring
    Sammy Davis Jr (1957)

    Modjeska – 192? – 1500 seats -Razed

    Molly Picon Theatre – see Jolson’s 59th

    Mon Paris – 142 East 53rd Street – 1930s nightclub

    Monroe Theatre – closed & demolished

    Monroe’s Uptown House – Harlem 1940s nightspot

    Moore’s Place – 133rd Street – 1930s – Billy Holiday

    Moriarty’s Saloon – Third Avenue – 1850s nightspot

    Moroccan Village – drag revue

    Morosco – 217 West 45th Street – 1917 – 954 seats – opened with
    Canary Cottage 1917 (112) (Eddie Cantor); Bat 1920 (867), Beyond the Horizon
    (Eugene O’Neill) (Pulitzer Prize) 1920 (111), Firebrand 1924 (287), Craig’s Wife
    1925 (360); The Letter (Katharine Cornell); Our Town (Frank Craven) 1938; Sim
    Sala Bim 1940; Blithe Spirit 1941 (657), Voice of the Turtle 1943 (1557), Sons
    and Soldiers (Geraldine Fitzgerald,Gregory Peck,Stella Adler,Karl Malden) 1943
    (22); Death of a Salesman (Lee J. Cobb) 1949 (742); Relapse or Virtue in Danger
    (Cyril Ritchard) 1950; Second Threshold (Clive Brook) 1951 (126); Cat on a Hot
    Tin Roof (Barbara Bel Geddes,Burl Ives,Mildred Dunnock,Ben Gazzara) 1955 (694),
    Time Remembered (Richard Burton, Helen Hayes); Silent Night Lonely Night (Henry
    Fonda); Don’t Drink the Water 1966 (598), Best Man (Melvyn Douglas) 1960 (520),
    The Private Ear and the Public Eye 1963; Forty Carats (Julie Harris) 1968 (780),
    Home (John Gielgud,Ralph Richardson); Price (Kate Reid) 1968; Butley (Alan
    Bates) 1972 (135); Moon For the Misbegotten (Jason Robards,Colleen Dewhurst)
    1973; Norman Conquests (Ken Howard,Richard Benjamin,Paula Prentice,Estelle
    Parsons) 1975 (76); Gemini 1977 (696-moved theatres), Golda (Anne Bancroft) 1977
    (13 weeks); Shadow Box 1977 (315), Da 1978 (697), Come on Strong, A Life 1980
    (72), Billy Bishop Goes to War 1980 (12); – transferred to Theatre de Lys; I
    Won’t Dance 1981 – demolished 1982 along with the Astor, Victoria, Bijou and
    Helen Hayes to make way for Marriott Marquis Hotel and the Minskoff Theatre

    Morse Recital Hall – 65th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues

    Moulin Rouge – see Olympia Theatre and New York Theatre

    Mount Vernon Gardens – summer theatre 1800 – for 3 seasons – NW corner of
    Broadway & Leonard

    Mt. Morris Theatre – closed

    Movieland – (Forum, 47th St) – 1918 – 1,100 seats – Razed, 1998

    Movie-Plex 42 – closed & demolished

    Mozart Hall - minstel shows – Broadway opposite Bond St

    Mud Bone Collective

    Murray Hill Cinema – closed & demolished

    Musical Theatre Works – 440 Lafayette St.

    *Music
    Box
    – 239 West 45th St. (Shubert-1,009 seats) – Built in 1921 by
    Irving Berlin and Sam Harris to house Irving Berlin’s revues – opened with
    Berlin’s Music Box Revue, which ran into several editions – Music Box Revues
    1921-22-23 and 1924, Cradle Snatchers 1925 (485), Chicago (George Abbott) 1926
    (172), Paris Bound 1927 (234), Once in a Lifetime 1930 (406), Of Thee I Sing
    (Victor Moore) 1931 (441), Dinner at Eight 1932 (232), As Thousands Cheer 1933
    (400); First Lady (Jane Cowl)1935; Of Mice and Men (Broderick Crawford) 1937
    (207), I’d Rather Be Right (George M. Cohan) 1938; Man Who Came to Dinner 1939
    (739), Star and Garter 1942 (609), I Remember Mama (Marlon Brando) 1944 (714),
    Summer and Smoke 1948 (100), Lost in the Stars 1949 (273), Flight Into Egypt
    (Zero Mostel,Jo Van Fleet,Paul Mann) 1952; Picnic 1953 (477), Bus Stop (Kim
    Stanley) 1955 (478), Separate Tables 1956; Dark at the Top of the Stairs (Pat
    Hingle,Teresa Wright) 1957 (468), Rashomon (Claire Bloom,Rod Steiger) 1959 (20
    weeks); Far Country 1961; Any Wednesday 1964 (982), Sleuth 1970 (1222), Absurd
    Person Singular 1974 (592), Comedians 1976; Side by Side by Sondheim (Millicent
    Martin,Julie N. McKenzie,David Kernan,Ned Sherrin) 1977 (384), Deathtrap 1978
    (1809), Far Country, Five Finger Exercise, Veronica’s Room, Who’s Afraid of
    Virginia Woolf; Agnes of God (Geraldine Page,Elizabeth Ashley,Amanda Plummer)
    1982 (599), Comedians, A Few Good Men (Tom Hulce) 1989 (497); State Fair (Donna
    McKechnie,John Davidson,Andrea McArdle) 1996 (118); Diary of Anne Frank (George
    Hearn,Linda Lavin) 1997 (221); Barrymore (Christopher Plummer) 1997 (240); Diary
    of Anne Frank (revival) 1998; Barrymore (Christopher Plummer) 1998 (240); Closer
    (Natasha Richardson,Rupert Graves) 1999 (173); Macbeth (Kelsey Grammer,Michael
    Gross) 2000 (13); Dinner Party 2000 (366);August: Osage County 2008; One Man, Two Guvnors (James Corden) 2012;


    Music Hall of Williamsburg – rock club – see Northsix

    Music Palace – closed

    Mutual Theatre – built as a burlesque house

    N

    *Nada – 445 West 45th
    Street

    *NADA – 167 Ludlow St. (60)

    Naked Angels – off Broadway theatre company formed 1986 – 2011 25th Anniversary

    Nassau Street Theatre – 1750 – 64-6 Nassau Street between Maiden
    Lane and John Street – opened originally as New Theatre in 1732 – large room
    used for about 4 years; nothing known until Richard III (1750); Othello 1751 –
    2nd Nassau Theatre – opened in 1753 with Conscious Lovers – abandoned 1754 –
    demolished 1765

    National Black Theatre – 2031-33 Fifth Avenue (at 125th Street) – (125 seats) – Founded in 1968 by Barbara Ann Teer, the theater was created to showcase productions by, and about, black Americans at a time when such stories rarely appeared on the mainstream stage. It has evolved into a cultural spawning ground, one that presents shows and workshops intended to foster respect for African ancestry and for black self-expression, and one graced over the years by artists like Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, Nina Simone, Nikki Giovanni and Maya Angelou – 2011 – theater is facing foreclosure yet again
    founded 1968

    National Concert Hall – see Chatham Theatre

    National Critics Institute – founded 1968

    National Music Hall – see Chatham Theatre

    National Opera House – N.W. corner of Leonard and Church Streets –
    burned 1841

    National Playwright’s Conference – 1965

    National Theatre – 2nd Avenue and Houston – (3000 seats)- opened in
    1838 – the renovated former Italian Opera House which opened in 1833 – Uncle
    Tom’s Cabin 1853 (325) (Purdy’s National), Tortesa the Usurer 1839 (6), Ten
    Nights in a Barroom 1858 (7), Trial of Mary Dugan 1927 (437), home of burlesque,
    run by Minsky’s – Criminal Code 1929 (174), Cat and the Canary 1922 (349); 2nd –
    National Theatre (NYC) – stood where Shubert and Booth Theatres are now – 1921 –
    abandoned and demolished to create Shubert and Booth Theatres – Cat and the
    Canary (Florence Eldridge) 1922; Ethan Frome (Raymond Massey,Pauline Lord,Ruth
    Gordon) 1936 (15 weeks); Little Foxes 1939 (410); Patriots 1943 (172), Call Me
    Mister 1946 (734), Medea 1947 (214); Lend an Ear (Carol Channing,Gene Nelson)
    1948 (460); Camino Real (Jo Van Fleet,Martin Balsam)1953 (7 weeks); Mrs.
    Patterson 1954; Inherit the Wind (Ed Begley,Paul Muni) 1955 (806), – demolished;
    3rd – National Theatre (NYC) – 1921 – see Nederlander – 1959 changed to the
    Billy Rose – Patriots 1943; Inherit the Wind (Paul Muni) 1955 (see Nederlander);
    4th – National Theatre – 1973-1996 – 1500 Broadway – 1445 seats – gutted for
    broadcast studios 1997; 5th – National Theatre – opened as Opera House 1833 –
    fire 1841; National Theatre/Roosevelt – 1913 – 2,863 seats – (Twin) – Razed,
    1959

    National Theatre Conference – mid 1920s but formally founded 1930

    National Theatre of the Deaf – touring ensemble of deaf performers – 1966

    National Twin – closed & demolished

    National Vaudeville Artists – clubhouse on 46th Street

    National Winter Garden Theatre – Houston Street – served as a
    synagogue – then a movie house, and to burlesque operated by Minsky

    Nazimova Theatre – see 39th Street Theatre – 2nd – Nazimova’s 39th
    Street Theatre (NYC) – 1910 – 119 West 39th Street (699) – opened with Little
    Eyolf starring Alla Nazimova 1910; Scandal (39 weeks); White Cargo; Laff That
    Off – became the 39th Street Theatre in 1911 – closed in 1926 and the theatre
    was razed and a 20 storey office building erected

    *Nederlander
    – 208 West 41st St. (Nederlander-1,250 seats) – see Trafalgar Theatre – 208 West
    41st St. (Nederlander-1,206 seats) opened 1921 as the National – Swords 1921;
    Ethan Frome; Tonight at 8:30; Little Foxes; Corn is Green; Call Me Mister; Lend
    an Ear; Camino Real – in 1958 became the Billy Rose, only Broadway theatre below
    42nd St. – 1978 theatre closed for a year, and was renamed the Trafalgar – Whose
    Life Is It Anyway; Betrayal – in 1980 became the Nederlander – Here’s Where I
    Belong; November People; Rose Tattoo; Sherlock’s Last Case; Devil’s Advocate
    (Leo Genn) 1961 (116); Tiny Alice (Irene Worth) 1964 (167); Who’s Afraid of
    Virginia Woolf (Uta Hagen,Arthur Hill,Ben Piazza)1962 (664), Death of Bessie
    Smith; One Night Stand 1980;Amen Corner 1983; currently Rent (Adam Pascal) 1996
    is breaking records – 1980 became Nederlander; Million Dollar Quartet 2010; Newsies (Jeremy Jordan) 2012;



    Negro Ensemble Company
    – formed 1967/68 – winner of Regional Theatre
    Tony Award 1969 – Brownsville Raid, Sty of the Blind Pig – located for a period
    at Theatre de Lys

    *Neighbourhood
    Playhouse
    – 340 E. 54th Street (between 1st and 2nd Avenues)- First
    Man 1922 (27); Dybbuk 1925; 2nd – – 2nd
    Neighbourhood Playhouse (NYC)
    - 466 Grand Street – founded 1915 – opened with
    Jephthah’s Daughter 1915; Grand Street Follies- 1926-1927 (148 perf) – closed 1927 and school of acting under same name
    opened at 340 East 54th Street

    Neil
    Simon
    – 250 West 52nd St. (Nederlander-1,467 seats) – built in 1927 as
    the Alvin – Funny Face 1927 (250); Girl Crazy (Ethel Merman) 1930 (272); Music
    in the Air 1932 (342); Mary of Scotland 1933 (248); Anything Goes (Ethel Merman)
    1934 (420); Porgy and Bess 1935 (124); I’d Rather Be Right (George M. Cohan)
    1937 (290); Boys From Syracuse 1938 (235); There Shall Be No Night (Alfred
    Lunt,Lynn Fontanne) 1940 (181); Lady in the Dark (Danny Kaye,Gertrude Lawrence)
    1941 (467); Something for the Boys (Ethel Merman); Joan of Lorraine (Ingrid
    Bergman); Helen Goes to Troy 1944 (3 months); Mister Roberts (Henry Fonda) 1948
    (1157); No Time For Sergeants (796);Darkness at Noon (Claude Rains) 1951; House
    of Flowers (Pearl Bailey,Diahann Carroll,Juanita Hall,Geoffrey Holder) 1954; A
    Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Shirley Booth); Point of No Return (Henry Fonda); Two’s
    Company (Bette Davis); Kind Sir (Mary Martin,Charles Boyer); Golden Apple; Oh
    Captain (Tony Randall) 1958 (192); Wildcat (Lucille Ball) 1960 (171);
    Greenwillow (Anthony Perkins, Pert Kelton,Cecil Kellaway) 1960 (97); Funny Thing
    Happened on the Way to the Forum (Zero Mostel) 1962 (964); High Spirits
    (Beatrice Lillie,Tammy Grimes) 1964 (375); It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s
    Superman (Bob Holiday,Patricia Morand) 1966 (75), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern
    Are Dead 1967 (421); Great White Hope 1968 (556) (James Earl Jones,Jane
    Alexander); The Music Man; Company (Elaine Stritch) 1970 (706); Shenandoah (John
    Cullum) 1975 (1050), Flora the Red Menace (Liza Minnelli); Annie (Andrea
    McArdle,Reid Shelton,Dorothy Loudon) 1977 (2377); High Spirits (Beatrice
    Lillie,Tammy Grimes); Your Arms Too Short to Box With God; Merrily We Roll
    Along; 1983 renamed Neil Simon Theatre with Brighton Beach Memoirs (Matthew
    Broderick)1983 (1530); Biloxi Blues (Matthew Broderick) 1985 (524); Long Day’s
    Journey Into Night (Jason Robards,Colleen Dewhurst) 1988; Jake’s Women (Alan
    Alda,Brenda Vaccaro,Joyce Van Patten,Kate Burton) 1992; King and I (Lou Diamond
    Phillips,Donna Murphy)1996 (807); Dinner at Eight, Swan Lake (all male) (Matthew
    Bourne) 1998; Scarlet Pimpernel (revised)1999; Elaine Stritch at Liberty; View
    From the Bridge; Cyrano, Rise and Fall of Little Voice; Orpheus Descending
    (Vanessa Redgrave); Ah Wilderness; Breaking the Code (Derek Jacobi); Blithe
    Spirit (Richard Chamberlain,Geraldine Page); Hairspray (Harvey Fierstein) 2002
    Tony Award 2003 Best Musical; Catch Me If You Can 2011;

    Nemo Theatre – 110th Street – closed & demolished

    Nest Club – Harlem nightspot 1920s

    New Actors Workshop

    New American Museum – see American Museum – 539-41 Broadway – 1865 –
    had been the Chinese Rooms – 1868 burnt to ground and never rebuilt

    *New
    Amsterdam Theatre
    – 214 West 42nd St. (Disney – 1,747 seats) –
    (Celebrating 100 years 2003 – ghosts abound here i.e. Olive Thomas – secret passage and escape route for dignitaries – upper floor housed Midnight Frolic with glass runway – New Amsterdam is currently playing host to The
    Lion King, its 164th production, and only its second since the theatre was
    restored and reopened by Disney in 1997 after 60 years without a legitimate
    entertainment); – atmospheric theatre – opened in 1903 with Midsummer’s Night’s
    Dream, the same night as the Lyceum – next door to the Lyric Theatre – built by
    Hearts & Tallant) (1,100 seats); Mother Goose 1903 (3 months) – roof housed 680
    seat Aerial Gardens (1904-1910)- Jardin de Paris – reopened 1915 as Danse de
    Follies until 1921; 1923 became The Dresden and later renamed the Frolic; in
    1930 became a radio studio – Madame Sherry; The Pink Lady; Caesar and Cleopatra
    1906, Free Lance 1906 (35); Brewster’s Millions 1906 (163); Forty Five Minutes
    from Broadway (Fay Templeton,Victor Moore) 1906 (90);Merry Widow 1907; Madame
    Sherry 1910 (231), Pink Lady 1911 (312), Ziegfeld Follies of 1913 (12 separate
    editions staged here); Sweethearts 1913 (136), Watch Your Step 1914 (175), –
    housed Ziegfeld Follies 1913 to 1924, and talents like Fred Astaire, Jack Benny,
    Fanny Brice, Eddie Canton, Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields 1915, Anna Held, Bob
    Hope, Will Rogers, Red Skelton, Will Rogers (starred in 6 editions 1916 to
    1925); Ziegfeld Follies of 1914 (Ed Wynn,Leon Errol) 112; in 1914 the rooftop
    theatre became Canse de Follies, and in 1923 became Frolic Theatre – Ziegfeld
    Follies 1918 (Will Rogers), 1921 (Will Rogers), 1922 (Will Rogers);Ziegfeld
    Girls of 1920 (Fannie Brice,W.C.Fields) 1920 (78); Sally (Marilyn Miller,Leon
    Errol) 1920 (570), Midnight Frolics 1921 & 1922; Rosalie 1928 (10 mos); Face the
    Music 1932 (21 weeks); Sunny 1925 (517); Earl Carroll’s Vanities 1925; Whoopee
    1928; Errol Carroll’s Vanities of 1930; Band Wagon (Fred and Adele Astaire) 1931
    (260); Face the Music 1932; Roberta 1933 (295); Revenge With Music 1934;
    Midsummer Nights Dream, She Stoops to Conquer; George White’s Scandals of 1936
    (Bert Lahr,Rudy Vallee); Forbidden Melody; Othello (Walter Huston) 1937 – then
    became a movie house in 1936, in 1983 theatre extensive renovations and
    completely restored by the Disney Company with parts leased to Madame Tussauds
    and AMC. In 1996 the sleaze died on 42nd Street, replaced by glowing new and
    refurbished theatres – King David 1997; The Lion King (Heather Headley) opened
    November 13, 1997 (still running as of Aug 2006, in different theatre) in what
    is once again the crown jewel of Broadway’s theatres; Mary Poppins 2006;

    New Apollo – see Apollo – Bent (Richard Gere,David Dukes) 1979
    (240); Fifth of July (Christopher Reeve,Swoosie Kurtz) 1980 (511);

    New Bowery Theatre – 1859 – see Bowery Theatre – Nick of the Woods
    1839 (12)
    New Brooklyn Theater – producing theater in, of, and by Brooklyn – Death of Bessie Smith performed in hospital; An Enemy of the People;

    New Century Theatre - 932 7th Ave @ 58th St – see Jolson Theatre

    New Chatham Theatre – see Chatham Theatre

    New Church – 112 East 35th Street

    New Cinema Playhouse – closed

    New Coliseum Theatre – 701 West 181st St. (Broadway ) – 1920 – 3,462
    seats – Quad – open

    New Colonial – see Colonial Theatre

    New Delancey Theatre – 1922 – 1,075 seats – Razed & demolished

    New Drama Forum Association – 1975

    New Europe Theatre – closed

    New Federal Theatre – new location for 2012 season – 40th Anniversary

    New 5th Avenue Theatre – NW corner of Broadway & 28th St – built 1860s as
    Gilsey’s Apollo Hall – known as St. James Theatre during early 1870s – destroyed
    by fire 1891 – rebuilt so entrance faced Broadway – became Proctor’s Vaudeville
    House in 1900 – closed 1938 as seedy movie house

    *New 42nd Street
    Theatre
    – 348 West 42nd St (between 8th & 9th)

    New 14th Street Theatre – see Tony Pastor’s

    New Georges Theatre

    New Globe Theater – proposal to
    build Elizabethan-style theatre within Castle Williams on Governors Island in
    New York Harbor – modeled on the Globe of Shakespeare’s day — and the modern
    Globe that now stands on the edge of the Thames in London – theatregoers would
    cross by ferry to attend performances – roofed, modern theatre structure
    designed by renowned British architect Norman Foster would allow for a proposed
    40 weeks of performances annually, to include Shakespeare, modern plays,
    concerts, films and more – seat 1,200 and offer 400 “groundling tickets” for
    people standing on the ground below the stage, as in Shakespeare’s day



    New Group - 10th anniversary season 2005 – successful producer of
    critically applauded productions – Hurlyburly, Aunt Dan and Lemon, Avenue Q,
    Ecstasy, Smelling a Rat and The Women of Lockerbie

    New Haarlem Arts Theater

    New Law Theatre – closed & demolished

    New Metro Twin – closed

    New National Theatre – see Chatham Theatre
    New Ohio Theatre – 154 Christopher St in Archive Building

    New Olympic – 1812; 2nd – New Olympic Theatre (NYC) – see Olympic
    Theatre

    New Opera House – The “Old Met” “New Opera House” is the “Old Met”,
    the original Metropolitan Opera House. It opened in 1883, and was demolished in
    1966 – see Metropolitan Opera

    New Park Theatre – see Park Theatre – 932 Broadway between 21st and
    22nd Streets – 1874 – 1882 destroyed by fire and never rebuilt; 2nd was on NE
    corner of Broadway and 35th Street on site of old Aquarium – 1883 – materials
    bought when Booth Theatre demolished – 1884 became a museum – 1894 became Herald
    Square Theatre – converted to movies 1912 – sold 1914 for commercial structure

    New Progress Theatre – closed Up in Central Park 1945 (504), High Button
    Shoes 1947 (727), Kiss Me Kate (Alfred Drake,Patricia Morrison) 1948 (1077); Out
    of this World 1950 – demolished 1930

    New Stages Theatre – Bleeker Street – Respectful Prostitute (1948) – moved
    to Cort Theatre

    New Theatre – see Broadway Circus, Century, Globe, Jolson, Nassau
    Street Theatre and Park Theatre – 1753 Nassau St – 1732 – renamed John Street
    Theatre – Richard III 1767; Prince of Parthia 1767; 2nd New Theatre (changed to
    Century Theatre 1911) – see Jolson’s 59th St. Theatre – Central Park West and
    West 62nd and 63rd Streets opened 1909 as subsidized people’s theatre – (2300) –
    62nd and Central Park West (2,318) – faced Central Park – roof theater called
    Century Roof – became Coconut Grove and then Casino de Paris, New Colonial,
    Harkess – opened with Antony and Cleopatra 1909; Nigger 1909; Century Girl 1916
    (Irving Berlin & Victor Herbert); Miss 1917 (Jerome Kern); Yip Yip Yaphank 1918
    (Irving Berlin); operettas (Rose of Stamboul, Princess Flavia, Floradora and
    Chocolate Soldier); The Miracle 1923 – closed 1929 – 1930 building was razed to
    accommodate apartment house; 3rd New Theatre – Up in Central Park 1945 (504),
    High Button Shoes 1947 (727), Kiss Me Kate (Alfred Drake,Patricia Morrison) 1948
    (1077); Out of this World 1950; Scuba Duba 1967 (692); Knack 1964 (685), Mad
    Show 1966 (871); Oh Coward 1972 (294)

    New Theatre Comique – see New York Theatre, Lucy Rushton’s Theatre

    New Theatre in the Park – 1797

    *New Victory Theatre – 209
    West 42nd St.(between 8th & 9th) – see Theatre Republic, Victory and Republic
    Theatres – built in 1900 by Oscar Hammerstein; Sag Harbour 1900; Abie’s Irish
    Rose (2,327 perf) – in 1931 Gypsy Rose Lee played here when operated by Minsky
    as Minsky’s Burlesque, Lili St. Cyr, Blaze Star, Hope Diamond and many others,
    WWII became a movie house called Victory and then X rated movie house –
    technically an off-Broadway theatre – First theatre to be opened under 42nd
    Street redevelopment programme – façade restored along with the theatre in 1995
    – New York’s theatre for kids and families – 1997 became New Victory

    New Wallack’s Theatre – see Wallack’s Theatre

    New World Stages - new name for Dodger Stages as of April 1/06 – Altar
    Boyz 2008;

    New York Academy of Music – see Academy of Music

    New York Bar – 1930s nightspot

    New York City Ballet – see also Lincoln Centre – 2004 is their 50th season

    New York City Center of Music and Drama – opened 1943 – see City
    Center of Music and Drama – Anna Christie (Celeste Holm) – transferred to Lyceum
    1952

    New York City Opera
    - Lincoln Center – established 1944 – engagements in L.A. and Washington –
    houses in Mecca Temple 1944 opened with Tosca – New York State Theatre since 1964 – New York
    City Opera is in negotiations to build a new opera house on site of the former
    American Red Cross New York headquarters near Lincoln Center which would leave
    an opening at State Theater. City Opera has a lease at the theater through 2014,
    and it must fulfill its financial obligations there through that date. Many
    expect the American Ballet Theater to fill the hole – facing bankruptcy after their 70 year history, Anna Nicole Smith may be their swan song
    New York Comedy Club

    New York Drama Critics Circle – formed 1935

    New Yorker Hotel – Terrace Room – ice shows – famous nightclub

    *New Yorker
    Theatre
    – opened 1930 on 254 West 54th Street – see Studio 54 – opened
    as Gallo 1927 with opera 1927 – and reopened 1930 as the New Yorker, with The
    Vikings – later become Studio 54 the name changed – 1933 became Casino de Paree
    – then Federal Music Theatre and once again New Yorker – 1943 converted to radio
    and tv studio – closed

    New Yorker Theatre – 1930? – Broadway near 89th Street – was called the
    Yorktown -1,255 seats – changed to New Yorker in 1962 – razed, 1979 (c.)-
    marquee shown in film Annie Hall

    New York Hippodrome – see Hippodrome

    New York Historical Society – 2 West 77th Street

    New York Improv – 318 West 53rd St – see Chicago City Limits

    New York International Fringe Festival

    New York Performance Works- 128 Chambers St (Just East of
    W. Broadway)


    New York Philharmonic
    -see Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center,Carnegie Hall
    New Silver Lining Theatre – Sweet Will (86);

    New York Roof - see Jardin Paris; New York Roof Garden

    New York Shakespeare Festival – (see Public Theatre) -founded 1954 by Joseph Papp-Delacorte Theatre(Central Park) – 1962 winner two Regional Theatre Tony Awards 1958 and 1970 -underwent renovation 1999 – Public Theatre (see) opened 1966 with Hair;Homebody/Kabul

    New York State Theatre – 20West 65th St.(see Lincoln Centre) – houses New York City Ballet (founded 1946) – Showboat (David Wayne,Constance Towers,Barbara Cook) 1967 (63); and New York City Opera -Candide 2008; closed for year 2008 being renamed David H. Koch Theater Fall 2008 – New York City Opera leaving the centre in 2011, leaving a large vacancy here for other companies


    New York Theatre
    – see Olympia and Criterion – 724-8 Broadway –
    originally Church of the Messiah – 1866 renamed New York – later theatre known
    as Fox’s Broadway and then Globe – 1881 became New Theatre Comique – burnt down
    1884 and not rebuilt; 2nd New York Theatre – on Broadway between 44th and 45th –
    originally Olympia Music Hall which opened 1895 as part of Hammerstein’s Olympia
    Music Hall complex, along with Lyric Theatre (later Criterion), see also New
    York Roof Garden, Jardin de Paris – reopened 1899 as New York Theatre – later
    used for vaudeville and films – demolished 1935 – see Lucy Rushton’s Theatre;
    3rd New York Theatre – Bowery – see Bowery Theatre – site of former Bull’s Head
    Inn – 1826 – The Road to Ruin 1826 – later became the Bowery – underwent many
    changes in name – burned down 6 times – 1828-1836-1838-1845-1923 and finally
    1929 after having been rebuilt 5 times; 4th New York Theatre – New York Theatre
    (NYC) – opened 1854 and was built on the site of the old Metropolitan Theatre
    (Tripler Hall) – Under the Gaslight 1867 (47), Naughty Marietta 1910 (136), In
    Dahomey 1903 (53); 5th – New York Twin – 1978 – 850 seats – 1978 Modern

    New York Theatre Ballet

    *New York Theatre
    Workshop
    – 79 East 4th St.(between Bowery & 2nd Aves) (150)- Slavs
    (Marisa Tomei,Joseph Wiseman) 1994 (64); Love’s Fowl 1998; Bright Lights,Big
    City 1999; Dirty Blonde (Claudia Shear)(40)-transferred to Helen Hayes; New York
    Theatre Workshop, La Mama E.T.C. and a number of other theatre spaces including
    the Kraine Theatre and Red Room complex will soon see their Off-Off Broadway
    block become the East Fourth Street Cultural District; Department of Housing
    Preservation and Development (HPD) plan to give six buildings to the arts
    organizations which currently reside in them. (East Fourth Street is nestled
    within the Cooper Square area – which lays between Bowery and First Avenue,
    bordered by 14th Street to the north and Delancey to the south.)

    New York Youth Theatre – 422 West 57th St. (Looking Glass Company)

    New Yorker Theatre – see Gallo Opera House

    Next Stage – 145 West 46th St. (6th & 7th)

    Niblo’s Gardens/Niblo’s Garden Theatre – (housed the Sans Souci
    Theatre) – NE corner of Broadway and Prince Street (537 Broadway (near Spring
    Street) & Prince Sts) on site of Columbia Garden – established 1822 on what had
    been horse ranch & circus grounds called the Stadium after War of 1812 – opened
    1827 as Sans Souci Theatre – rebuilt (1762 to 3,200 seats)- reopened in 1829 as
    Niblo’s Gardens – burned down in 1846 – rebuilt in 1849 as New Niblo’s Gardens,
    part of the Metropolitan Hotel – Black Crook 1866 – and rebuilt again after
    another fire in 1872 – demolished in 1895 and was New York’s oldest playhouse –
    Kit The Arkansas Traveller 1871 (40), Evangeline or Belle of Acadia 1874 (16),
    Leah the Forsaken 1863 (35), Black Crook 1866 (475)(first Broadway show to run
    for more than a year) – 1872 burnt down again, rebuilt, but demolished 1895 –
    replaced by office bldg

    Nightclub 54 Below – 254 W 54th St – one floor below Studio 54 – opening June 2012 with Patti LuPone; followed by Ben Vereen, Megan Hilty, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Linda Lavin, Andrea Martin, Rebecca Luker – first class performance space and dining experience

    92nd Street YMCA – 1395
    Lexington Ave – lectures, concerts

    95th Street Market – see Symphony Space

    Nokia Theatre Times Square – open

    Nola Studios – 250 W 54th St – Gaugin/Savage Light (2004) – now in 6th year (Sat & Sun @3 pm)

    Nora Bayes Theatre – 1913 – 216 West 44th Street – see Weber and
    Fields Music Hall and 44th Street Theatre – rooftop – destroyed when New York
    Times enlarged printing plant 1945

    Normandie Theatre – closed & demolished

    Northsix – rock club – Williamsburg – reopening as Music Hall of
    Williamsburg

    Norworth Theatre – 125 West 48th St – 1918 – see Jack Norworth,
    Belmont Theatre – just east of the Playhouse – about 500 seats – opened with
    Odds and Ends of 1917 moved from the Bijou starring Jack Norworth (8 weeks) –
    renamed Belmont and in 1919 – Crops and Croppers; I.O.U.; became Theatre
    Parisien but by 1920 was once again the Belmont – Miss Lulu Bett 1921; You and I
    1923; Americana (Helen Morgan) 1926 (224); Stepping Sisters 1930; – theatre
    closed in 1933-1937 – In the Bag 1937 – until 1937 when it became a cinema –
    demolished and replaced by commercial buildings in 1951

    Nova Theatre – West 147th Street – built 1913 as the Bunny Theatre (named
    after vaudevillian John Bunny) – have shut their doors in the last few months
    (Apr 2003)

    *Nuyorican Poets Café – 236 East 3rd St.

    NYC Restaurant – 75 Greenwich Avenue

    O

    Oak Room
    – (see Algonquin Hotel) – 59 West 44th St (between 5th and 6th) – 85
    seat cabaret room – Andrea Marcovicci, Julie Wilson, Karen Akers, Harry Connic Jr, Michael Feinstein – hotel renovations reopens May 2012 but Oak Room will NOT reopen after renovations

    *Oasis Theatre – 230 East 9th St.

    Obie Awards – presented by Village Voice since 1955-56 season

    Odeon Theatre – East 145th Street, near 7th Avenue – now Union
    Baptist Church

    Odeon Theatre – see Central Theatre

    Off-Broadway – term applied to widely dispersed group of small theatres
    away from principal commercial theatre centre – producing groups including
    Circle in the Square, La Mama, Living Theatre, Negro Ensemble, Phoenix, N.Y.
    Shakespeare Festival for example



    Off-Off Broadway Review

    Odgen, Bronx – 1922 – 1,370 seats – Church

    *Ohio Theatre
    – 66 Wooster St.(between Spring & Broome St) (Soho Think Tank – resident
    company) – founded 1979 – loft area was a former hat factory (120)

    Old Bowery Theatre – see Bowery Theatre

    Old Lyceum Theatre – see Lyceum

    Old Stuyvesant Hall – also known as Academy Hall, Donaldson’s Opera House –
    Broadway opposite Bond St, above Bleecker

    Olympia Cinemas – closed & demolished

    Olympia Music Hall & Lyric Theatre – 1895 – East side of Broadway
    between 44th and 45th Streets – built for Oscar Hammerstein in 1895 – 2 main
    auditoriums Music Hall (later known as New York Theatre) and Lyric and Roof
    Garden (Jardin de Paris 1907) – 2800 seats – North of Metropolitan Opera – Lyric
    opened with Excelsior Jr. 1895; In Gay Paree 1899; Santa Maria; War Bubbles; Man
    in the Moon 1899– Music Hall renamed New York Theatre and Lyric Theatre became
    Criterion in 1899; The Girl From Maxim’s 1899; Little Minister (Maude Adams);
    Zaza (Mrs. Leslie Carter); Other Girl (Lionel Barrymore); Dictator (John
    Barrymore); Miss Hook of Holland; Bachelor’s Baby; Iphigenie en Aulide (Isadora
    Duncan); Naughty Marietta 1910; 1912 theatre changed to Moulin Rouge – theatre
    closes 1914 – 1915 vaudeville and movies for awhile and by 1916 all movies –
    Happiness (Laurette Taylor and Lynn Fontanne) 1917; Three Wise Fools (316);
    Letter of the Law (Lionel Barrymore) 1920; Winsome Widow 1921 (Moulin Rouge – 5
    months Leon Errol and Mae West); Quo Vadis; Ben Hur; Little Johnny Jones (George
    M. Cohan) – Lyric’s name changed to Vitagraph in 1914 but back to Criterion in
    1916 –New York Theatre (Marie Dressler); Happiness (Laurette Taylor) 1917 (136);
    Ziegfeld Follies of 1912 (11 weeks) – see Hammerstein’s Music Hall – 1935 New
    York, Criterion and remains of Olympia was demolished in 1935; 2nd – Olympia
    Theatre (NYC) – see Criterion, Tony Pastor’s and New York Theatres – Broadway
    and 107th Street – opened 1914 – 1279 seats – closed December 2002 after 90
    years in business – Razed, 2003

    Olympia Roof Garden – see Jardin de Paris

    Olympic Theatre – see Mitchell’s and Laura Keene’s Varieties – 444
    Broadway between Howard and Grand Streets (later 442 Broadway) – opened as a
    burlesque house 1937 – 1839 became Mitchell’s Olympic and flourished for over 10
    years with burlesque and extravaganzas – 1850 closed and again in 1851 – burnt
    down 1854; 2nd Olympic Theatre – 622-4 Broadway, above Houston St – 1856 and
    became Laura Keene’s Varieties – 1863 reopened as Olympic – Rip Van Winkle 1864
    (35), Humpty-Dumpty 1868 (483); Horizon 1871 (63), Glance at New York 1848 (75),
    – closed 1880 and was demolished – shops built on site; 3rd New Olympic Theatre
    – 585 Broadway – 1856 – became Buckley’s Olympic; 4th – Anthony Street Theatre
    was known as Olympic 1812 – remade from circus building on Anthony (now Worth)
    between Broadway & Church Sts – 1814 – became Pavilion – then Anthony Street
    Theatre – demolished – became Christ Episcopal Church; 5th – there was a circus
    known as Olympic Arena 1858; 6th – short-lived Olympic on 8th Avenue in 1860;
    7th – Olympic Music-Hall at 600 Broadway on site of old Alhambra (1860-1861);
    and 8th – Wallack’s Theatre was renamed Olympic in 1862 – demolished 1880 –
    first burlesque – Cincinnati, Louisville, Chicago, Minneapolis in early 1880s
    part of the New York circuit

    O’Neals Times Square – Broadway Scandals of 1928 1982

    One Dream Theater – 232 West Broadway (at North Moore Street)

    Ones – Discotheque, 1972-1982

    116th Street Theater – closed

    175th Street Theatre, at Broadway, in Washington Heights – opened in
    1930- now used as a church – was a Loews theatre

    135th Street Library Theatre – Anna Lucasta 1944 (Earle Hyman) –
    American Negro Theatre production – transferred to Broadway

    One Sheridan Square – l Sheridan Square – Greenwich Village U.S.A.
    1960, Hostage 1961 (545)

    *Ontological Theatre at St. Mark’s
    Church
    – 131 E. 10th St.

    Onyx Club – 72 West 52nd Street – 1930s nightclub

    Open Door – Greenwich Village club 1950s

    Open Theatre – group established in 1963 to explore live theatre – Viet
    Rock 1966; Serpent 1968; Terminal 1969; Mutation Show 1971; Nightwalk 1973 – see also Living Theatre –
    disbanded

    Operettas - first few decades of 20th Century art form – Naughty Marietta;
    Desert Song; Rose-Marie; Merry Widow (1905); Student Prince; Enchantress; Song
    of Norway; Red Mill; Pirates of Penzance; Toyland, etc.

    Opia Restaurant – 130 East
    57th Street- cabaret room opens on

    Ordway’s Aeolians – mid 19th Century touring minstrel ensemble

    Oriental Theatre – burlesque house operated by Minsky

    *Orpheum Theatre
    – 126 Second Ave. (7th & St. Mark’s Place) was premiere Yiddish
    theatre in the early 1900s (347)- originally called the Players Theatre – later
    changed to Orpheum – Billy Barty; original productions of Oleanna (William H.
    Macy) 1992 (513); Little Mary Sunshine 1959 (1143); Half Past Wednesday 1962;
    Your Own Thing 1968 (933), Me Nobody Knows 1970; Little Shop of Horrors 1982
    (2209); Psycho Beach Party 1987 (344); Oleanna 1992 (513); oldest site of
    continuous entertainment in Manhattan from the 1880s – in 1950s became
    off-Broadway theatre – currently Stomp in its 7th year (as of Feb. 28/01)

    Orpheum Theatre Chain – chain of vaudeville theatres founded late 19th
    Century – between Chicago and West Coast – later merged with B.F. Keith’s chain
    and after demise of vaudeville, became part of RKO
    Other Side of Silence – gay theatre started 1974

    Other Stage – see Public Theatre

    Outer Critics Circle – formed 1950

    Over There Theatre League – group formed during WWI to entertain troups
    overseas

    Oxford, Bronx – 1927 – 1,950 seats – Gutted; Grade school

    P
    Pabst’s Harlem – largest beer hall in the nation at the time and would mostly like still be if it was open. The modest 125th Street entrance has been simplified today for commercial storefronts but the back dining emporium is still intact on the 124th Street end of the property. These beer gardens were popular uptown with the German population in Harlem at the early part of the 20th Century and were known as lobster palaces for the usual nightly offerings on the menu. Unfortunately, 256-258 West 125th Street appears to be on the market for the highest bidder and the grand building is not protected by landmark

    Pace
    University
    – see Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts

    Paddock Club – above Earl Carrol Theater – Seventh Street & Broadway –
    1930s

    Pagoda Theatre – closed & demolished

    Palace of Variety – 125 West 42nd
    Street – vaudeville featuring Bindlestiff Family Cirkus

    *Palace
    Theatre
    – 1564 Broadway @ 47th (Nederlander-1,706 seats – Built as
    vaudeville house in 1911 – opened with La Belle Paree (Al Jolson), variety acts, one was Ed Wynn – became a
    cinema – then became the mecca for aspiring artists – Troubles of 1920 with
    George Jessel 1920; film house in 1930s (1932 Palace stopped as a 2 shows a day
    house; 1930s and 1940s became film house – 1965 renovated and now a major home
    to Broadway musicals – featured Ethel Barrymore,Harry Belafonte, Fanny Brice,
    Jack Benny, George Burns and Gracie Allen (1926); Betty Hutton, Georgie Jessel,
    Danny Kaye, Lily Langtry(with Alfred Lunt); Jerry Lewis; Shirley MacLaine, Liza
    Minnelli; Will Rogers, Diana Ross, Eva Tanguary, Sophie Tucker (1924); had
    Monday matinees – Oklahoma (original opened 3/43 to 5/48 – 2,212), renovated to
    the legendary theatre where Judy Garland made her comeback; Sweet Charity (Gwen
    Verdon) 1966 (608), Henry Sweet Henry 1967; George M (Joel Grey) 1968 (427);
    Applause (Lauren Bacall) 1970 (896); Beatlemania; Cyrano (musical-Christopher
    Plummer) 1973; Bette Midler 1974 (19 performances) Tony Award 1974; Clams on the
    Half Shell (Bette Midler) 1975 (10 weeks); Lorelei (Carol Channing) 1974;
    Treemonisha 1975; Goodtime Charley 1975, Grand Tour 1979; revival Oklahoma
    (Laurence Guittard,Christine Andreas) 1979; Woman of the Year (Lauren
    Bacall,Harry Guardino) 1981 (770), Cage aux Folles (6/83 to 11/87 – 1,761
    performances), First Breeze of Summer; Will Rogers Follies 1991 (983), Beauty
    and the Beast (transferred to Lunt Fontanne Nov. 1999) 1994; *Aida; Minnelli on
    Minnelli 1999; Legally Blonde 2008; Priscilla Queen of the Desert 2011;

    Palais de Danse – Broadway & 50th – 1910s nightspot

    Palais Royal – see Latin Quarter

    Palladium Theatre – see Gallo Opera House, Studio 54; 2nd –
    Palladium Theatre (NYC) – West 14th St.- across from former Academy of Music –
    National Lampoon Show (Gilda Radner,John Belushi,Bill Murray)1975 (23 weeks)

    Palais Royal – 48th & Broadway – 1920s – Paul Whiteman, Tommy Dorsey

    Palestine Theatre – 1926 – 1,219 seats – now Daycare Center

    Palmer’s Theatre – see Wallack’s Theatre; 2nd – Palmer’s Theatre
    (NYC) – Margaret Fleming 1891 (1) ; 3rd – Palmer’s Union Square Theatre – built
    as adjunct to Union Square Hotel – SE side of Broadway at 4th Ave – opened as
    variety theatre 1870 – became Keith & Albee – 1921 became Acme – demolished 1936

    Palmo’s Opera House – 1844 – see Burton’s Chamber Street Theatre –
    formerly Arcade Baths – Chambers St between Broadway and Centre St – 1844 –
    became Burton’s Chamber St. Theatre – demolished 1876 – became American News Co.

    Palsson’s Supper Club – Forbidden Broadway 1982 (2,332; 534 2nd
    Edition; 576 – 3rd Edition)

    *Pantheon
    – 303 West 42nd St – 2nd Pantheon – black theatre, corner of Bleecker and Mercer
    St 1821-22

    Paradise – see Loew’s Paradise

    Paradise Ballroom – Broadway & 49th – 1930s nightclub

    Paradise Theatre – 64 East 4th St. (Bowery & 2nd)

    Paradise Theatre Bronx - 1929 – atmospheric – now halved into Paradise One
    and Two – now restored to a single auditorium – renovated and opened as a
    performing arts center. Also declared New York City landmark c. 2004 both
    exterior and interior – (reference: cinematreasures.org – one forum message
    includes a link to the landmark preservation report)

    Paraiso Theatre – closed & demolished

    Paramount – Manhattan – Casa Loma Orchestra, Buddy Roger’s Orchestra
    – demolished; 2nd –
    Paramount HotelBilly Rose’s Supper Club – in basement here 1938-1951 – renovated and reopened 2013 – see also Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe

    Paramount
    Theatre
    - 1930s – Times Square at 43rd Street – 1 block S of Astor
    Hotel – 3,644 seats – stage was graced regularly by the likes of Benny Goodman
    1936, Jack Benny, Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin –
    showed films in 1940s – theatre was closed in 1964 – WWF is rebuilding the
    marquee and arch that once framed Times Square’s Paramount Theater – five-story
    gateway at Broadway and 43rd Street – Paramount Building, was constructed from
    1926 to 1927 with an auditorium at its base – 3,664 seats; theater closed in
    1964 and was replaced by office floors while the marquee and arch disappeared –
    rebuilding is to be done from photographs – word “Paramount” will be illuminated
    above the arch in the script of the movie studio – crown will be strong enough
    to serve as an outdoor stage – Christmas Carol 1994 – the original marquee still
    hangs from a Times Square building; 3rd – Paramount Theatre – 1501 Broadway –
    1926-1963; 4th – Paramount (Loew’s Coliseum)- 1926- Gutted; 1964
    Paris Blues – Harlem jazz venue
    Parisian Room – Broadway & 50th – 1910s nightspot

    Paris Theatre – open

    Park & 86th Street Cinemas – closed

    Park Avenue Armory - historic brick building dedicated 1880 – 643 Park Avenue bet. 66th and 67th – Wade Thompson Drill Hall – Tamara 1987; Black Watch – full season of cultural activities planned 2012

    Park Avenue Theatre – closed & demolished

    Park Central Hotel – Cab Calloway – famous nightclub

    Park Lane Theatre – see 63rd St. Music Hall/Daly’s 63rd St. Music
    Hall – 1927 – 2,012 seats – Razed, 1950s

    Park-Miller Theatre – see Henry Miller’s Theatre

    Park Plaza, Bronx – 2,061 seats – Retail

    Park Theatre
    – 21-5 Park Row – first important theatre in U.S. – known as “Old Drury of
    America,” built 1798 as New Theatre to replace the John Street Theatre – 24th
    Street West of Broadway (Park Row) – (same name used by old Majestic) – opened
    with As You Like It 1798; School For Scandal – New York’s only playhouse for 25
    years – in 1841 “London Assurance” ran for 3 weeks – the earlies “long run” –
    burned down 1820 – 1841 Park was used as circus but burned again 1848 and not
    rebuilt – Female Patriotism or Death of Joan d’Arc 1798, Hunchback; Andre 1798
    (3); Fashion or Life in New York 1845 (20), Gladiator 1831, Lion of the West
    1831, Metamora or the Last of the Wampanoags 1829, Hamlet 1832; Mighty Dollar
    1875 (104), Our Boarding House 1877 (104), People’s Lawyer 1842 (1), Midsummer
    Night’s Dream 1826, She Would Be Soldier or The Plains of Chippewa 1819, Spy,
    Tale of the Neutral Ground 1822, Widow’s Son or Which is the Traitor 1825,
    Colonel Sellers 1874(119), Brutus or Fall of Tarquin 1819, Bianca Visconti or
    the Heart Overtasked 1837 – destroyed by fire in 1820 and reopened in 1821 as
    The New Park Theatre (2600 seats) ; destroyed by fire 1848; New Park Theatre
    opened in 1874 and in 1876 the name was changed to Abbey’s New Park Theatre –
    burned down in 1882 – demolished; 2nd Park Theatre – first professional
    playhouse built in Brooklyn 1863 – 1876 became burlesque – burnt down 1908 and
    not rebuilt; 3rd Park – from 1889 to 1894 Herald Square Theatre was known as
    Park; 4th – as was the Majestic Theatre for some years from 1911; 5th – Park
    Theatre – Brooklyn – opened 1863

    Parkway, Bronx – 1927 – 1,700 seats – Razed

    Park West Theatre – closed & demolished

    Paul Mazur Theatre at Asphalt Green – 555 East 90th Street

    Paul Recital Hall – 65th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues

    Pavilion Theatre – see Anthony Street Theatre and Chatham Theatre;
    2nd – Pavilion Theatre – Brooklyn Heights; 3rd – Pavilion Theatre – Brooklyn
    Heights; 4th – Pavilion Theatre – Park Slope

    *Pearl Theater Company
    80 St. Mark’s Place (between 1st & 2nd Aves)- founded 1984 – old atmospheric theatre – new 20 year lease on 160 seat home on 42nd Street formerly vacated by Signature Theater

    Pelham, Bronx – 1928 – 1,300 seats – Retail (Gutted?)

    Pelican Studio Theatre – 750 8th Ave (New Perspectives resident
    company) (60) 6th Floor – building is made up of two townhouses joined together
    – was a speakeasy in 1920s, a jazz club and a movie theatre – hand and
    footprints of such stars as Ruby Keeler, Myrna Loy and Gloria Swanson

    Penta Hotel – 33rd Street – 1930s nightspot

    People’s Theatre – closed & demolished

    People’s Vaudeville Company – 127 W 23rd St (near 8th Avenue)

    Peppermint Lounge – twist started here in 1960s – opened 1961

    Performance Group – 1967 – Dionysus in 69 (1968); Makbeth (1969)

    Performance Space 122 – 30th Anniversary 2011 – now closed for extensive renovations – East Village home was former schoolhouse – to have 2 state of arts performance spaces – Surface Transit 2000

    Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center – donations being made for this new space – see World Trade Center

    Perry Street Theatre – 31 Perry Street (West of 7th Avenue) – opened
    1982 and closed 1995 – originally opened in 1975 – 1987 it became home to New
    York Theatre Workshop until 1992 when they moved to their East 4th Street home.
    While there, they presented the New York premiere of Caryl Churchill’s Mad
    Forest. In 1993 the Barrow Group presented its work there until the theatre
    closed its doors in 1995. The Perry Street Theatre housed such works as the OBIE
    Award winning The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me and Dylan Thomas: Return Journey
    – reopened January, 2005 after 9 years – critically acclaimed In the Continuum
    ran at the house until recently – closing permanently July 23/06 – building to
    be converted into residences

    Persian Room – Plaza Hotel 1960s – Shirley Bassey (early 1960s)
    Pershing Square Signature Center – 480 W 42nd St – Romulus Linney Courtyard Theater

    Peter Jay Sharp Theater - 416 West 42nd Street – 4th floor of the PHHQ
    (Playwrights Horizon)

    *Peter Norton Space
    – 555 West 42nd Street – see Signature Theatre Company at Peter Norton
    Space; Peter Norton Symphony Space (NYC) – see Symphony Space; Angels in America 2010;

    *Phil Bosakowski
    Theatre
    – 354 West 45th St (between 8th & 9th Aves)- built 1902 and
    has housed porn filmmakers – street level is Primary Stages (99 seats) and other
    theatre 1 flight up (75 seats)

    Pete’s Candy Store – rock club

    Philharmonic Hall – now Alice Tully Hall – West 65th St. (Lincoln
    Centre) – Leonard Bernstein conducting at opening – Consecration of the House –
    see Avery Fisher Hall – New York Philharmonic is the oldest major symphony
    orchestra in the U.S., founded in 1842

    Phoenix Theatre – 1953 – a former movie house on East 12th Street
    and 2nd Avenue, formerly Yiddish Art Theatre – 1100 seats – opened as Phoenix in
    1953, with Madam, Will You Walk (Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn)1953 Coriolanus
    (Robert Ryan); The Seagull (Montgomery Clift) 1954; The Chairs and The Lesson;
    Irene Worth and Eva LeGalliene in Mary Stuart; Who’ll Save the Plowboy?; June
    Havoc starred in The Beaux Stratagem; and Uta Hagen in A Month in the Country;
    Golden Apple (Kaye Ballard) 1954 (173-moved to Alvin for 125 perf.); Littlest
    Revue 1956; Good Woman of Setzuan (Uta Hagen) 1956; Once Upon a Mattress (Carol
    Burnett) 1959 – in 1961 became Casino East – became burlesque house 1965 –
    renamed Eden 1969 – Oh Calcutta – 1977 became Entermedia with 1143 seats – It
    left its Lower East Side home in 1961, moving to a 300-seat theatre on East 74th
    Street- to 2nd Phoenix, also known as Phoenix 74th Street Theatre, originally
    the East 74th Street Theatre – smaller 400 seat theatre at 74th Street – Oh Dad,
    Poor Dad, Mamma’s Hung You in the Closet and I’m Feeling So Sad (Barbara Harris
    and Austin Pendleton) 1962 (454) debut at the new space – renamed Eastside
    Playhouse 1968 – A few years later, the troupe joined forces with Ellis Rabb’s
    Association of Producing Artists

    Photoplay Theatre – closed

    Phyllis Anderson Theatre – Bei Mir Bistu Schoen 1961

    Piano Bars

    Piano Store – 158 Ludlow St. (S. of Stanton St.)
    Pier 55 – several new performances spaces might be in the works for New York City’s west side – proposal for a $170 million park, which would be built on a multilevel platform 186 feet off the shoreline of the Hudson River, including “a series of wooded nooks and three performance venues, including an amphitheater.” The park, to be called Pier 55, would replace Pier 54, a flat 875-foot structure that has been gradually sinking into the river – To oversee the park’s performance venues, Mr. Diller has recruited film and theatre producer Scott Rudin; former producer of the Public Theater, George C. Wolfe; director and producer Stephen Daldry; and British theatre executive Kate Horton – largest planned performance space would accommodate up to 1,000 people in seats and another 2,500 on a lawn, while other areas of the park would hold an 800-seat amphitheater and a small stage with 250 seats

    Pierre – famous nightclub

    Pike’s Opera House – NW corner of 8th Ave & 23 St – 1868 – became
    Grand Opera House, then RKO movie house – demolished 1960

    Pix Theatre

    Plantation Club – atop Winter Garden – Broadway & 50th – 1920s; Plantation
    Club 2 – West 126th Street – 1920s; Plantation Club 3 – relocated to original
    Cotton Club spot – 142nd St – 1930s

    Players Club – most distinguished of American theatrical clubs – incorporated
    1888 – patterned after London’s Garrick Club – Gramercy Park – housed John Wilkes Booth’s bedroom

    *Players
    – 115 MacDougal Street (between West 3rd St. & Minetta Lane) (248)- Parade 1960;
    Secret Life of Walter Mitty 1964; Lovers 1975; Psycho Beach Party (Charles
    Busch) 1987 (344); Ruthless 1992; Zombies From the Beyond 1995; Rubbers and
    Yanks; Trainspotting 1998 (17)

    Players Equal Suffrage League – formed 1913 – group disbanded after women
    were enfranchised

    Players Theatre – built
    1907, addition was added in 1909 – is being renovated for music and theatrical
    performances to start Fall 2006 – many uses over the years, including a horse
    stable and garage, and became a theatre in the late 1950s – 248-seat venue at
    115 MacDougal Street at Minetta Lane – Recently closed Off-Broadway theatres
    include the Promenade, Sullivan Street, Circle in the Square Downtown, the
    Houseman, the Fairbanks, Variety Arts and Perry Street – see Orpheum – World of
    Lenny Bruce 1974 (17 weeks); tenant is Café Wha?, the famed basement music club
    that was a hangout for Allen Ginsburg, Abbie Hoffman and Bob Dylan in the 1960s.
    Jimi Hendrix, Bruce Springsteen, Kool and the Gang, Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor
    are some of the performers who began their careers at Café Wha?

    *Playhouse 91
    – 316 East 91st St. (between 1st & 2nd Aves)- 299 seats – home of Jewish
    Repertory Company, which produced such shows as Kuni-Leml, A Majority of One,
    The Fishkin Touch, Home of the Brave and Abie’s Island Rose there. It lost its
    residency in 2000 – Yours, Anne 1985; Radical Radio 1995; Quartermaine’s Terms;
    Syringa Tree – nearly two-year run 2000; Menopause – the Musical (1,500+
    performances) – theatre closed May 2006 – being sold

    Playhouse on Broadway – 1732

    Playhouse on Van Dam – see Soho Playhouse – Bought and Paid For 1911
    (431)

    Playhouse Theatre/William Brady’s Playhouse – 137 West 48th Street –
    1911 – 900 seats – see Plymouth – opened with Sauce for the Goose with Grace
    George 1911; Bought and Paid For (first success) 1911 (431), A Gentleman of
    Leisure (Douglas Fairbanks) 1911; Over Night (transfer from Hackett); Major
    Barbara 1915; Man Who Came Back; Man Who Came to Dinner 1917 (400); Show Off
    1924 (571; Street Scene 1929 (601); Three Men on a Horse (Shirley Booth,Sam
    Levene) 1935; Duke of Darkness 1944 (3 weeks); Glass Menagerie 1945 (561); – ABC
    Studios 1949 to 1952 – Travelling Lady (Kim Stanley) 1954 (30); Simply Heavenly
    1957; Make a Million (Sam Levene) 1958 (308); Miracle Worker (Anne
    Bancroft,Patty Duke) 1959 (719); Never Too Late 1963 (1000); Impossible Years
    1965 (670) – site used for Mel Brook’s film The Producers (non-musical one) –
    demolished 1969 and now is McGraw-Hill building; 2nd Playhouse Theatre – off
    Broadway at 359 West 48th Street – originally Presbyterian Church – opened 1970
    with 499 seat Playhouse Theatre on upper floor and 200 seat Bijou Theatre on
    lower – Don’t Bother I Can’t Cope 1972; Bistro Car on the CNR 1978; Cleavage
    1982

    Playwright’s Company – producing company founded 1938 – dissolved 1960

    *Playwrights Horizon
    – (Anne Wilder) 416 West 42nd St.(between 9th & 10th Aves) (145 seats)- 2nd
    Floor – opened orginally at the Clark Center for the Performing Arts – now
    houses 2 theatres, offices and rehearsal space – opening January 2003 – started
    in 1971 at Clark Center for the Performing Arts – home to Playwright’s Horizon
    and to have a new home in Sept. 2002 – existing theatre to be torn down in
    summer of 2001 – development of new theatre on same site – 198 seat mainstage
    and a 96/128 studio space, as well as rehearsal rooms and costume shop under one
    roof – In Trousers 1979; March of the Falsettos 1981; Sister Mary Ignatius 1981
    (947), Isn’t It Romantic (Betty Comden) 1982 (733), Three Postcards 1986;
    Perfect Party 1986 (70); Driving Miss Daisy 1987 (1195); Lucky Stiff 1988;
    Falsettoland (Faith Prince) 1990 – transferred to Lucille Lortel; Once on This
    Island 1990 – transferred to the Booth Theatre (469) ; Assassins (Victor
    Garber,Debra Monk) 1991; Later Life (Carole Shelley) 1993;Avenue X 1994; Violet
    1997; Baby Anger 1997; Uneasy Chair 1998; Betty’s Summer Vacation 1999; James
    Joyce’s The Dead (Christopher Walken,Blair Brown) 1999 – transferred to Belasco
    1999; Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin 2000; Other People 2000; I Am
    My Own Wife (Doug Wright)2003 – transferred to Lyceum Theatre 2003 (Pulitzer
    Prize 2004) – has completed a major renovation of 440 Studios, 440 Lafayette –
    downtown Manhattan home of the Playwrights Horizons Theater School and site of
    rehearsal studios used by many New York City theatre artists and troupes – now
    Lower Manhattan’s largest rehearsal space complex – third floor was the site of
    the major renovation – now includes eight rehearsal studios and a 68-seat
    theatre, formerly the Linhart Theater, now renamed The Robert Moss Theater, for
    Playwrights’ founder – reopened Jan. 15/09

    Playwright’s Theatre – see Provincetown Playhouse

    Plaza – Corono

    Plaza Hotel - 770 Fifth Avenue – Nearly a century ago, famed architect Henry Janeway
    Hardenbergh built The Plaza in the same basic style as his other Central Park
    masterpiece, The Dakota (1884). It was 18 storeys high, and conceived along the
    lines of a late Renaissance French chateau; When it opened on Oct. 1, 1907, it
    had solid mahogany doors, marble lobbies, and 1,650 chandeliers – see Persian
    Room, Plaza 9 Music Hall – hotel closed its door April 30/05 – new Plaza would
    open in stages in the next few months. A handful of condominium owners have
    already moved in – Palm Court and the ballrooms are expected to open in
    December, and the hotel and new retail stores in early 2008 – famed Oak Room now has Monday Night Supper Club Series, which will continue through Dec. 13, created to bring back the atmosphere of New York supper clubs of the 1940’s and 1950’s;

    Plaza 9 Music Hall (Plaza Hotel) – Bits and Pieces, XIV (1964 – 426 perf); Free Fall; Julius Monk’s reviews
    – Dime a Dozen (1962) (728); El Grande de Coca Cola (1973)(1,114);

    Plaza Theatre – closed & demolished

    *Plymouth
    Theatre
    – 236 West 45th St. – being renamed Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre
    May 9, 2005 – (Shubert-1,079 seats) Built in 1917-18 – opened with A Successful
    Calamity (moved from Booth); The Naked Truth 1917; Man Who Came Back 1916 (457);
    Wild Duck (Nazimova) 1918; Redemption (renamed Living Corpse, with John
    Barrymore) 1919; The Jest (Lionel and John Barrymore) 1919; You Can’t Take It
    With You (original 837); Night Lodging (Edward G. Robinson, Pauline Lord) 1919
    (14); Show Off 1924 (571); Street Scene 1929 (601); Road to Rome 1927 (392);
    Holiday 1928 (230); Old Soak 1922 (325); What Price Glory 1924 (435); Burlesque
    1927 (372); Counsellor-at-Law 1931 (397); Abe Lincoln in Illinois 1932 (472);
    Lone Valley 1933 (3)Three Men on a Horse 1935 (835); Accent on Youth 1934 (229);
    Skin of Our Teeth (Tallulah Bankhead,Frederic March,Florence Eldridge) 1942
    (359); Lovers and Friends (Katharine Cornell,Raymond Massey) 1943 (21 weeks);
    Glass Menagerie (Laurette Taylor) 1945 (561); Petrified Forest; Magnificent
    Yankee;Lute Song (Mary Martin,Yul Brynner) 1946 (18 weeks); Happy Time 1950
    (614); Dial M For Murder 1952 (552); Caine Mutiny Court-Martial (Henry
    Fonda,Lloyd Nolan,John Hodiak)-directed by Charles Laughton) 1954; 3 For Tonight
    (Harry Belafonte,Marge and Gower Champion) 1955 (11 weeks); Trouble in Tahiti/27
    Wagons Full of Cotton (Maureen Stapleton) 1956 (6 weeks); The Marriage-Go-Round
    (Claudette Colbert,Charles Boyer,Julie Newmar) 1958; Miracle Worker (Anne
    Bancroft,Patty Duke) 1959 (719); Odd Couple (Walter Matthau,Tony Randall) 1965
    (964); Irma La Douce (Elizabeth Seal)1960 (524); Gideon 1961 (236); Plaza Suite
    (Maureeen Stapleton,George C. Scott) 1968 (1097); Never Too Late 1962 (1007);
    Slow Dance on the Killing Ground (George Rose) 1964; Impossible Years 1965
    (670); Gingerbread Lady (Maureen Stapleton) 1970 (193); Don’t Bother Me I Can’t
    Cope 1972 (1065); Equus (Anthony Hopkins,Peter Firth,Frances Sternhagen,Marian
    Seldes) 1974 (1209); Otherwise Engaged 1977; The Life and Adventures of Nicholas
    Nickleby 1981;Slab Boys (Sean Penn,Kevin Bacon,Val Kilmer) 1983; Real Thing
    (Jeremy Irons,Glenn Close,Christine Baranski,Kenneth Welch) 1984;Burn This (John
    Malkovich) 1987 (437); Heidi Chronicles 1989 (621); Everything in the Garden,
    Irma La Douce, Otherwise Engaged, Runaways, Dancing at Lughnasa 1991 (421);
    Passion (Marin Mazzie,Donna Murphy) 1994; Delicate Balance (revival Rosemary
    Harris,George Grizzard,Elaine Stritch,Elizabeth Wilson,Mary Beth Hurt) 1996
    (186); Jekyll and Hyde (Linda Eder) 1997; Thou Shalt Not 2001; Taboo (Boy
    George) 2003 (100)

    Pocket Theatre – America Hurrah (Bill Macy) 1966 (634); How to Steal
    an Election 1968

    Pod’s & Jerry’s – located by Small’s & Connie’s in Harlem 1920s

    Poisson Rouge – night club and entertainment venue
    Polonsky Shakespeare Center – see Theater for a New Audience

    Portfolio Studio – Philemon 1975

    Powerhouse Theatre – see Vasser College

    Pregones Theater Studio – 700 Grand Concourse (at 153rd Street) – merging with Puerto Rican Travelling Theater

    Present Company – 445 West 45th Street

    *Present Company
    Theatorium
    – 198 Stanton St. – resident companies Fringe NYC; Fringe
    Central; Present Co.; Magic Circle; Childrens’ Series; Monster Dog Series;
    Public Works Project

    President Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre – 247 W 48th St –
    opened 1926 as Edyth Totten Theatre – Secret Sands 1926; 1919 renamed President
    – became movie theatre several times as Hindenberg, Caruso early 1930s – 1933
    became Midget – No Mother to Guide Her (midget actors) – became Artef but
    company disbanded 1937 – other groups leased theatre – Ben Bagley’s Shoestring
    Revue (Chita Rivera,Beatrice Arthur,Arte Johnson)1955 – taken over by Piscato’s
    Dramatic Workshop – 1956 became part of Mama Leone’s restaurant – 1988 entire
    bldg demolished (theatre and eatery)

    *Primary Stages/Phil Bosakowski
    Theatre
    – see 45th Street Theatre – 354 West 45th St. (8th & 9th)-
    built in 1902 (99 seats)(see Phil Bosakowski Theatre also)- new building 59 East
    59th Street – Stendhal Syndrome (Isabella Rossellini,Richard Thomas) Feb 2004

    Primi Della Classe Ristorante – 228 West 72nd Street, NYC), cabaret site
    of Trudi Mann’s Wednesday and Sunday shows will be closing its doors on April
    16/04

    Princess Theatre – 104 West 39th St – 1913 – 299 seats -(Broadway
    and 6th Avenue) – 299 seats – built by the Shuberts – (same named used by
    off-Broadway 50th Street Theatre in 1980s – opened with bill of 5 plays by
    Princess Players – The Switchboard, Fear, Fancy Free, Any Night and A Tragedy of
    the Future 1913 (115); Maternite 1915; Nobody Home (Jerome Kern & Guy Bolton)
    1915 (5 mos); Very Good Eddie 1915 (341), Go To It 1916; Oh Boy 1917 (463); Oh
    Lady! Lady! 1918 (219); Oh, My Dear 1919; in 1920 Provincetown Players appeared
    in Emperor Jones; Six Characters in Search of an Author 1921 (17 weeks); White
    Desert (George Abbott) 1922; The Virgin Man 1927 (closed as immoral); theatre
    was renamed for actress Lucille La Verne 1928 – Sun Up 1928 – but next year back
    to Princess and to Assembly 1929 – early thirties film house called REO Cinema –
    International Ladies Garment Workers Union acquired and changed to Labor Stage
    in 1937 – Pins and Needles 1937 (1108 between Labor Stage and large Windsor
    Theatre on 48th Street) – in 1937 became a film house – 1944 reopened as Cinema
    Dante and became Theatre Workshop – 1947 became home of Experimental Theatre
    Group– from 1947 under various names including Princess again -1948 name changed
    to Little Met and in 1952 to Cinema Verdi –– was cinema until demolished in
    1955; 2nd Princess Theatre – Fearless Frank 1980 (12); Pump Boys and Dinettes
    1982 (573) – see Latin Quarter

    Proctor’s Fifth Avenue – see New Fifth Avenue, Temple Theatre –
    vaudeville house on 28th Street between Broadway and 6th Avenue; 2nd – Proctor’s
    58th Street Theatre (NYC) – approx 3000 seats – first theatre in New York City
    to be wired for RCA sound; 3rd –
    Proctor’s 23rd Street
    (NYC) – 141 W 23rd St – had been church – converted 1883 into a theatre named
    Temple Theatre – Men and Women 1890 (204), Country Fair 1889 (105), Lillian
    Russell (1905) – reverted to church – torn down 1888 – site became Proctor’s
    23rd St. (Grand) 1888 – 1,551 seats – Razed; Proctor’s 125th – 1890 – 1,568
    seats – Burnt, 1987

    *Producers Club
    Theatre
    – 358 West 44th St. (8th & 9th)- several smaller to medium
    size theatres

    *Producers Club II – 616 Ninth Avenue

    Progressive Stage Society – 1905 – radical organization

    *Promenade Theatre
    - 2162 Broadway (North of 76th St.) (402)- opened in 1964 changed to
    its current name in 1969 – large off Broadway house – houses the McGinn Cazale
    Theatre upstairs – Promenade 1969; Godspell (transferred from Cherry Lane,
    before opening on Broadway in 1976) 1971; Preppies 1983; Hey,Ma…Kaye Ballard
    1984; Hurlyburly (William Hurt,Harvey Keitel,Christopher Walken,Jerry
    Stiller,Cynthia Nixon,Sigourney Weaver,Judith Ivey) 1984 (45 perf. and
    transferred to Ethel Barrymore); Curse of the Starving Class 1985 (267); Lie of
    the Mind 1985 (185); Birds of Paradise 1987; Cocktail Hour (Nancy Marchand,Bruce
    Davison) 1988 (350); Love Letters 1989; Catch Me If I Fall 1990; Curse of the
    Starving Class (267 perf);Old Wicked Songs 1996 (210); Phantom of the Opera
    1997; Power Plays (Elaine May,Alan Arkin) 1998; Things You Shouldn’t Say Past
    Midnight 1999; currently houses Tryst, will close following the final
    performance of that play on June 11/06 – will be converted for another use; – closed

    Prospect Gardens – became Hollywood Club – 1600 Broadway at 49th Street –
    1890s hotspot

    Prospect Park Picnic House – Prospect Park, Park Slope

    Prospect, Bronx – 1,450 seats – Renovated; Closed; poss.

    *Provincetown
    Playhouse/Provincetown Players
    – group of American actors founded in
    1916 – Wharf Theatre, Providence, Rhode Island, a converted fishing shack –
    moved to Playwrights Theatre in Greenwich Village opened in 1916 in a town house
    at 139 MacDougal St., with Bound East for Cardiff 1916, and after 2 seasons
    moved 1918 to number 133 MacDougal St., formerly a stables and bottling plant –
    – between Washington Square South and West 3rd St – launched the career of
    Eugene O’Neill – Hand of the Potter 1921 (21) – ceased operations in 1921 –
    reopened 1924 – demise after 1929 stock market crash – demolished 1930 after
    brief life as the Irish Theatre – closed until 1936 and reopened as WPA Federal
    Theatre Project – in 1941 four buildings (133-139) were rebuilt as apartments,
    offices and a new Provincetown Playhouse – the theatre is once again dark – God
    of Vengeance (Sam Jaffe) 1922; in 1924 a production of O’Neill’s All God’s
    Chillun Got Wings because of an interracial kiss led to bomb threats against the
    theatre – Provincetown Playhouse gave up affiliation in 1929) — Zoo Story/Krapp’s
    Last Tape (William Daniels,George Maharis) 1960 (582), Sun Up 1923 (356), Moon
    of the Caribbees 1918, Long Voyage Home 1917, Hairy Ape 1922 (120), In Abraham’s
    Bosom 1926 (277), All God’s Chillun Got Wings 1924 (43), Krapp’s Last Tape/Zoo
    Story 1960 (582), O Say Can You See 1962; Golden Screw 1967; Vampire Lesbians of
    Sodom 1985 (2024); Unfinished Song 1991; Elaine Stritch: At Liberty 2001 – AMNY
    reports that New York University has announced plans to demolish the 170-seat
    theatre, which is not landmarked (Apr 2008) – Provincetown Playhouse will not be
    demolished but will be restored and will be an active theater

    *P.S. 122
    – 150 First Avenue (9th & 10th) – 160 seats – two theatres housed in former
    public school – 25th year 2004

    P.S. 166 – 132 West 89th Street (Manhattan School of Arts and Technology)
    – as of June 10/03 being renamed Richard Rodgers School of Arts and Technology

    *Public Theatre/Joseph Papp
    – 425 Lafayette Street (between Astor Place & 4th St)- (celebrating 50th
    Anniversary 2005) – the brilliant Joseph Papp leased old Astor Library building
    in 1967 and it now houses a total of 6 performance spaces including Martinson
    Hall (193) 1971; Newman (299) 1970; Anspacher (277) opened 1967; Shiva (99)
    1968; LuEsther (199) and Joe’s Pub (150) – opened with Hair 1967 (1836 with
    transfer to Broadway’s Biltmore for extended run), Cities in Belzique 1969; No
    Place to be Somebody 1969 (250), Sticks and Bones 1971 (366)(121 off Broadway
    and 366 on Broadway), Creditors and The Stronger (Geraldine Page/Rip Torn), Fen,
    Prayer for My Daughter, Rebel Women,That Championship Season 1972 (844), Chorus
    Line 1975 – transferred to Shubert for long run; For Colored Girls Who Have
    Considered Suicide…1976; I’m Getting My Act Together and Taking It On The Road
    1978 (1165); Runaways 1978; FOB 1980; Human Comedy 1983 (transferred to
    Broadway); Marriage of Bette and Boo (Joan Allen,Mercedes Ruehl,Olympia Dukakis)
    1985; Aunt Dan and Lemon (Linda Hunt) 1985 (191); Hamlet (Kevin Kline) 1986;
    Twilight: Los Angeles,1992 (1994); Wings 1993; Bring in ‘Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da
    Funk 1995 – transferred to Ambassador in 1996; Pericles 1998; Love’s Fire 1998;
    Everybody’s Ruby 1999; Ride Down Mount Morgan 1999; In the Blood 1999 (32);
    Elaine Stritch: At Liberty 2001 (transferred to Broadway) – modifications, which
    will primarily focus on the lobby and entryway of the building, including a new
    mezzanine that will overlook the current lobby area and increase the capacity
    from 250 to 690 theatregoers – redesign will feature glass enclosures around the
    staircases leading into the lobby and new signs created to help patrons locate
    the Public’s individual theatres more easily

    P.T. Barnum’s Museum – see Barnum’s American Museum – corner Ann St &
    Broadway – joining Park Theatre, City Hall Park, City Hall and Astor House –
    originally Scudder’s Museum – 3,000 seats – 1865 burned down – became New York
    Herald’s offices

    *Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre -
    304 West 47th St. (8th & 9th) (194 seats) – see 47th Street Theatre – now at 141
    West 94th Street – merging with Pregones Theater

    *Pulse Theatre
    – 432 West 42nd St. (9th & 10th)

    Punch & Judy Theatre – 153 West 49th Street – 1914 – see Charles
    Hopkins – opened with The Marriage of Colombine 1914; Treasure Island 1915;
    Rollo’s Wild Oats 1920 (7 months); Makropulos Secret 1926 (294); Where’s Your
    Wife; Merchants of Venus; Devil in the Cheese (Bela Lugosi) 1926 – in 1926
    became the Charles Hopkins Theatre – Devil in the Cheese (Bela Lugosi) 1926 –
    The Ivory Door (Frederic March,Henry Hull) (10 mos); Mrs. Moonlights 1930 (321)
    – and in 1934 changed to Westminster Cinema – 1935 became the World Theatre –
    1982 became the Embassy 49th Theatre – demolished in 1987

    Purdy’s (New) National – see National, and Chatham Theatre

    Purple Onion – intimate cabaret of 1970s

    *Pyramid Club – 101 Avenue A (6th & 7th)

    Q

    Quad Cinema – 34 W 13th St – 1971 to present

    Quaigh – Momma’s Little Angels – demolished
    Queen’s Stadium – opened 1923 – 1st national tennis championship at the club 1915 – In 1960s Jimmy Connors, John Lennon, Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Monkees, Beatles and The Who – 2013 – to hold 19 concerts over next 3 years

    Queens Theatre in the Park
    – Flushing Meadows, Corona Park near Shea Stadium (Queens, NY) – renamed Main
    Stage Theatre and in 2002 will become the Claire Shulman Playhouse (464 seats) –
    originally designed for NY World’s Fair in 1964 and then served as the mainstage
    for Playwrights Horizon in the late 1970s – plays,musicals,dance – to undergo
    renovation starting in 2003 – Prince and the Pauper 1997

    *Quintero Theatre
    – see Jose Quintero Theatre

    R

    Radiant Center – see Craig Theatre

    Radio and TV Studios - see TV and Radio Studios

    *Radio City Music
    Hall
    – largest indoor theatre in the world at 1260 6th Avenue @ 50th
    Street – atmospheric type – built in 1931 to 1939 with Rockefeller Center, as
    the International Music Hall but changed before it opened in 1932 – by Donald
    Desky (6,200 seats)- opening production was not success – closed and reopened a
    month later as combined film and variety theatre – companion house RKO Roxy
    cinema – renovation in 1999 to restore to original Deco splendour – originally
    showed lst run film along with stage show featuring the Rockettes – Liberace
    1986; Peter Allen; Riverdance – 1996; 1997; 1998; 2000-01

    Radio Playhouse No 4 - see Gallo Opera House

    Radio Playhouse No 1 – see Hammerstein’s Theatre

    Radium Club – Harlem – 1930s hotspot which was open all night

    Rainbow Room/Rainbow and Stars ( Rainbow and Stars opened 1989)- now
    closed (Rainbow Room – opened 1934) – atop Rockefeller Centre at 30 Rockefeller
    Plaza (between 49th and 50th Sts) – Rosemary Clooney, Tony Bennett, Vic Damone,
    Anthony Newley, Karen Mason, Vivian Reed, Joe Williams, Ann Hampton Callaway,
    Amanda McBroom; Leading Men Don’t Dance 1997 – recession has reached the ritzy
    Rainbow Room, the fabled special-occasion spot that looks out over Rockefeller
    Center – owners plan to close the Italian-themed Rainbow Grill restaurant
    temporarily, while keeping the establishment’s bar, banquet space and
    dinner-dancing going – has symbolized glamour since it opened in 1934, in the
    thick of the Great Depression. The Room is home many a theatre related gala, and
    several events have already been scheduled for the early months of 2009

    Rainbow Theatre – closed

    Ramrod Theatre – closed & demolished

    Random Arts

    Ranelagh Gardens - open air concerts

    *Rattlestick
    Theatre
    – 224 Waverly Place (just west of 7th Avenue)- Crumple Zone
    2000

    *Raw Space
    – 529 West 42nd St. (10th & 11th)- several theatres and rehearsal spaces

    *Raymond
    J. Greenwald
    - 307 West 26th St.(between 8th & 9th Aves)

    Rebel - rock club – W 30th St – 325 person capacity – formerly Downtime

    Recital Theatre – see Daly’s 63rd St. Music Hall

    Rector’s – 43/33th Street – Longacre Square, later became Times Square –
    1880s

    *Red Room Complex
    – see Kraine, St. Marks and Horse Trade Theatres; New York Theatre
    Workshop, La Mama E.T.C. and a number of other theatre spaces including the
    Kraine Theatre and Red Room complex will soon see their Off-Off Broadway block
    become the East Fourth Street Cultural District; Department of Housing
    Preservation and Development (HPD) plan to give six buildings to the arts
    organizations which currently reside in them. (East Fourth Street is nestled
    within the Cooper Square area – which lays between Bowery and First Avenue,
    bordered by 14th Street to the north and Delancey to the south.)
    Red Rooster – Harlem jazz venue
    Reese & Weber – Broadway area hotspot 1920s

    Regency
    Hotel
    – see Feinsteins

    Regency – 1987 Broadway (67 & 68th) – closed

    Regent’s Club – 317 East 53rd
    Street – new cabaret venue – closing August 15/04

    Regent Theatre
    – 116th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Blvd in Harlem – built 1912 – 1845
    seats – now First Corinthian Baptist Church

    Regina Opera Company

    Rehearsal Club – founded 1913 to provide inexpensive lodgings for young
    actresses – closed 1980 – on West 43rd from 1926-1979, and other locations in between – Carol Burnett, Blythe Danner, Jo Van Fleet, Sandy Duncan, Jayne Meadows, Kim Cattrall and other notables stayed there

    Reisenweber’s – became O’Meara Gardens – 981 8th Avenue at Columbus Circle
    (57/58th Sts) 1908-1924

    Rendezvous – St. Nicholas Avenue, Harlem – 1930s nightclub

    Renaissance Theater and Casino – West 137th St – opened 1921 as a storied social club owned, operated and frequented by blacks – now closed more than 30 years – venue was built in stages – complex included ballroom, billiard parlor, stores and China House restaurant – leading hot spot in Harlem and the city. Known as the Renny, it hosted Joe Louis fights. Big bands led by Cab Calloway, Count Basie and Duke Ellington performed on its stage. The Renaissance was also the home court, at a time when blacks were barred from the National Basketball Association, for the Black Fives basketball team known as the Harlem Rens, regarded as one of the best of its time. The adjacent 900-seat theater featured movies by Oscar Micheaux, the first African-American to produce a feature-length film. The casino was used for a 1923 anti-lynching meeting held by the N.A.A.C.P. In 1953, David N. Dinkins, who went on to become the city’s first black mayor, and his bride held their wedding reception there – started to taper in the 1960s as integration opened downtown clubs to blacks – closed in 1979

    Reno Sweeney’s – 126 West 13th Street – small intimate club in
    Village on West 13th Street (1972 to 1977) – famous Paradise Room featured the
    likes of Barbara Cook, Ellen Greene, Julie Budd, Peter Allen, Manhattan
    Transfer, Marcia Lewis, Maxene Andrews, Judy Kaye, Sybill Shepherd, Nell Carter
    – closed 1977

    REO Cinema – see Princess Theatre

    Repertory Theatre of Lincoln Center – founded 1960 by Robert
    Whitehead and Elia Kazan as co-directors – see Vivian Beaumont Theatre – see
    Lincoln Center

    Republic Theatre – opened as a burlesque house on 207 West 42nd
    Street – see also New Victory – West of 7th Avenue, adjoining the Victoria
    Theatre (1899) – see also Victory Theatre, Belasco Theatre and also Theatre
    Republic – built 1900 – changed to Belasco 1902 but reverted to Republic in 1910
    as Belasco’s 2nd theatre, Stuyvesant was renamed Belasco – Woman 1911 (247),
    Good Little Devil (Mary Pickford,Lillian Gish) 1913 (131); Common Clay 1915
    (316); Parlor, Bedroom and Bath 1917 (232); Parlor, Bedroom and Bath 1917 (232);
    Peter Ibbetson (John Barrymore,Lionel Barrymore,Constance Collier,Laura Hope
    Crews) 1917; Lawful Larceny 1922; Porgy 1927; Hit the Deck 1927 (352); in 1932
    became home to Minsky’s Burlesque shows – 1942 converted to movie theatre, the
    Victory – fell into decline – reopened in 1995 as New Victory

    Revelation Theater – will
    inaugurate its new Off-Broadway theatre at the new 334 West 39th Street space –
    new theatre space features a classroom and rehearsal space and Revelation’s home
    offices – will stage its first production at Theatre Four – own space in old
    garage at 334 W 39th Street (154 seats) – a few blocks from Times Square – 154
    seats and a wide playing area similar to Signature Theatre Company’s digs on W.
    42nd Street – Temporary Help 2002

    Rialto – name taken from famous district in Venice to denote New York’s
    theatre district in 1870s when principal theatres were located between Union
    Square and Madison Square

    Rialto Theatre – see Hammerstein’s Victoria – 1916-1935 – 42nd St &
    7th Avenue – 2,300 seats – Razed demolished 1935 – new Rialto opened 1935 –
    Musical Chairs 1980; Blues in the Night (Leslie Uggams) 1982 – demolished 1999
    for office bldg

    *Riant Theatre
    – 161 Hudson St., between Hubert and Laight Streets (120)

    *Richard
    Rodgers
    – 226 West 46th St. (Nederlander-1,382 seats) – Built as the
    46th Street Theatre in 1924 – 1990 renamed the Richard Rodgers – Follow Thru
    1929 (403), Good News 1927 (557), Farmer Takes a Wife 1934; Hellzapoppin 1938
    (1404), DuBarry Was a Lady 1939 (408), Panama Hattie (Ethel Merman) 1940 (501),
    Dark of the Moon 1945 (318), Finian’s Rainbow 1947 (725), Guys and Dolls 1950
    (1200),Damn Yankees 1955 (1019), New Girl in Town 1957 (431), I Do I Do 1966
    (560), Killing of Sister George 1966 (205); How To Succeed in Business 1961
    (1417), 1776 (Howard DaSilva,William Daniels,Ken Howard,Betty Buckley) 1969
    (1217), No No Nanette 1971 revival (861), Raisin 1973 (847), Best Little
    Whorehouse in Texas 1978 (1639), Chicago 1975 (898), Do You Turn Somersaults,
    Ritz 1975 (400), 1776 (original 1217), Working 1978; Nine(Raul Julia) 1982
    (732), Fences (James Earl Jones) 1987 (526), Oh Kay (revival) 1990 (77); Lost in
    Yonkers (Mercedes Ruehl,Irene Worth,Kevin Spacey) 1991 (780), How to Succeed in
    Business Without Really Trying (Matthew Broderick) 1995; Chicago (Bebe
    Neuwirth,Ann Reinking,Joel Grey) 1996 – moved to Shubert; Steel Pier (Karen
    Ziemba,Gregory Harrison,Debra Monk) 1997 (76); Seussical – 2000 (198); Movin’
    Out 2002; Side Show (Alice Ripley,Emily Skinner) 1997 (91); Footloose 1998;
    Seussical 2000 (198); 45 Seconds From Broadway (Marian Seldes) 2001 (73); In the
    Heights 2008;


    Richard Rodgers School of Art and Technology – 132 West 89th Street –
    renamed from P.S. 166 as of June 10/03

    Richmond Hill Theatre – SE corner of Varick and Charlton Street –
    converted from a mansion (Mortier House)1822 – opened as a summer resort – Road
    to Ruin 1831 – became Italian Opera House 1832 – later known as Tivoli Gardens
    and back to original name – demolished 1849

    Rickett’s Circus – SW corner of Broadway and Exchange Alley; 2nd –
    Rickett’s Amphitheatre – Broadway & Exchange Alley – moved to Greenwich St 1797
    – later renamed Greenwich St. Summer Theatre; 3rd – Rickett’s New Amphitheatre –
    82-84 Greenwich St, back to Washington St.

    Ridgewood Theatre – Thomas Lamb gem – one of oldest continuing operating
    theatres in U.S. – closed March 2008 after 92 years

    Rio Bamba – 151 East 57th St. – 1940s nightspot

    Rio Café – Harlem nightspot 1940s

    Ritz – 225 West 48th Street – Mary Stuart 1921; Robert E. Lee 1923 –
    success came in 1924 with Outward Bound and Old English; Power 1937; 1939 taken
    over for radio and tv – Jerome Kern Goes to Hollywood 1986 (13) – reconditioned
    1972 – Ian McKellen Acting Shakespeare 1984; Doubles (John Cullum,Ron
    Leibman,Austin Pendleton,Tony Roberts) 1985 (277); Jerome Kern Goes to Hollywood
    1986 (13); Penn and Teller 1987; Late Night Comic 1987 – See Walter Kerr Theatre

    Riverside Theater – 1911 -1,858 seats – closed & demolished 1976; 2nd Riverside Theater – located in historic Riverside Church

    Riviera Theatre – 1918 – 3000 seats – closed and Razed, 1976

    Rivoli Theatre – Times Square – 1917-1992 – 1620 Broadway – 2,092
    seats – 1955 Todd A-O – demolished – now Caroline’s Comedy Club

    RKO Alhambra Theatre – 7th Avenue (Powell Blvd) and 126th Street –
    1905 – 1435 seats – now home of Department of Motor Vehicles; 2nd – RKO Castle
    Hill, Bronx – 1927 – 1,454 seats – Church;3rd – RKO Center Theatre (NYC) – see
    RKO Roxy Theatre; 4th – RKO Chester, Bronx – 1927 – 2,473 seats – Auto Shop,
    Part Gutted; 5th – RKO 81st Street Theatre – closed & demolished; 6th – RKO 59TH
    St. – 1922 – 1,551 seats – Razed, 1979 – 7th – RKO 86th Street Theatre – 3160
    seats – closed & demolished 1965; 8th – RKO 58th St. 1926 – 3,163 seats
    -Atmospheric – Razed, 1968; 9th – RKO Fordham, Bronx – 1921 – 2,446 seats –
    Razed, 1987;10th – RKO Franklin, Bronx – 1921 – 2,951 seats – Razed, 1980;11th –
    RKO Hamilton Theatre – closed; 12th – RKO Jefferson Theatre – closed &
    demolished; 13th – RKO Keith’s Theatre – Flushing, Queens – Atmospheric style –
    opened 1928 with vaudeville – closed – gutted 1987 to be demolished for condos;
    14th – RKO Proctor’s 58th Street – Atmospheric style – closed & demolished; 15th
    – RKO Proctor’s 125th Street – closed & demolished; 16th – RKO Roxy Theatre
    (NYC) – 6th Avenue & 49th Street – 1932-1956 – 6200 seats – opened with stage
    show and film “The Animal Kingdom”; 1933 name changed to RKO Center Theatre and
    showed movies until 1934 when RKO was dropped as it opened with The Great Waltz
    for nine months and then back to films – then White Horse Inn 1936 (nearly 7 mos);
    Virginia 1937 (60); The American Way 1939 (9 mos); Swingin’ the Dream (13); – in
    1940 it started ice shows “It Happens on Ice,” featuring Sonja Henie – then
    space leased to NBC for television studio and in 1954 building was demolished
    for a 19 storey skyscraper; 17th – RKO 23rd Street Theatre – closed & demolished

    Roane’s Place – 141st Street, Harlem 1930s nightspot

    Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Theatre – see Walter Kerr Theatre

    Robert Todd’s Tavern – itinerant entertainers

    Rockwood Music Hall - rock club
    Rockland Palace Dance Hall – famous event hall at the corner of 155th street and Frederick Douglass Avenues in Harlem, where political rallies, sport events, concerts, and elaborate dragballs were held during the Harlem Renaissance. It was torn down in the 1960’s and is now a parking lot
    Romulus Linney Courtyard Theater – 150 seats – see Pershing Square Signature Center – 480 W 42nd St

    Roof Garden Theatres - see American Theatre, Olympia Theatre,
    Victoria Theatre, New Amsterdam Theatre, New Theatre and Weber & Fields’ Music
    Hall

    Room – 27 West 20th Street

    Roosevelt Grill – Harlem nightspot 1930s

    Roosevelt Hotel – Madison & 54th – 1930s – Guy Lombardo

    Roosevelt Little Theatre – closed & demolished

    Roosevelt Theatre – (Roosevelt Grill) 7th Avenue and 145th Street –
    famous nightclub – now a Pioneer Supermarket
    Roseland Ballroom – built 1922 as ice skating rink- West 52nd St – 1950s converted to roller rink, 3,500 capacity – opened as Roseland 1956greats from Glen Miller, Frank Sinatra, Beyoncé, Madonna, Phil Collins, Nirvana, Metallica, Radiohead, Green Day, Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, and Guns n’Roses have played here – initially founded in Philadelphia, PA, in 1917, Roseland was moved to 1658 Broadway at 51st Street in New York in 1919 and opened at its 52nd Street location in 1958 – to close April 7, 2014 to become 50 storey skyscraper

    Rose Room – (see Algonquin Hotel)

    *Rose’s
    Turn
    – 55 Grove Street – intimate cabaret

    Rose Theatre – see Frederick P. Rose Theatre – 5th Floor – Rose Building –
    West 65th Street and Amsterdam Avenue – 1,094 seats – see Lincoln Center

    Rose Theatre – closed

    Rosemary Theatre – closed

    *Roundabout -Stage
    Right- 1530 Broadway @ 45th St.- over 30 years (Criterion Center Stage Right)-
    1974 -in a converted cinema – largest list of regular subscribers in New York –
    Come Back Little Sheba (Philip Bosco,Shirley Knight) 1984; Privates on Parade
    (Jim Dale,Donna Murphy) 1989 (64); Stand Up Tragedy 1990 (13); Price of Fame
    (Charles Grodin) 1990; Light Up the Sky 1990; Anna Christie (Natasha
    Richardson,Rip Torn,Liam Neeson,Anne Meara) 1993; Grand Night for Singing 1993;
    Company – revival 1995(68); 1776 (Tom Aldredge,Pat Hingle) 1997 (333); View From
    the Bridge 1997 (239); Impossible Marriage 1998 (Laura Pels); Side Man 1998
    (transferred to John Golden with Christian Slater) 1998; Lion in Winter (Stockard
    Channing,Laurence Fishburne) 1999; Skull in Connemara 2001

    Round Table – (see Algonquin Hotel)

    Roxy Theatresee
    photo
    – 135 West 50th Street at 7th Avenue – built 1927-1961 (6,214
    seats) – atmospheric type – was world’s largest and most elaborate movie palace
    ever built – Cinemascope 1953 – demolished 1960 – replaced in 1964 by a bland
    office tower

    *Royale
    – being renamed Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre 2005 – 242 West 45th
    (Shubert-1,078 seats) – opened 1927 with a musical comedy Piggy – changed to
    John Golden in 1934 and went back to Royale in 1940 – Diamond Lil (Mae West)
    1928 (22 weeks); Both Your Houses 1933 Pulitzer Prize (120), – 1934 renamed John
    Golden – 1936-40 used for broadcasting – returned to old name in 1940 – Strange
    Fruit (Eugenia Rawls,Murray Hamilton,Ralph Meeker) 1945; Importance of Being
    Earnest (John Gielgud) 1947 (10 weeks); Affairs of State 1950 (610), New Faces
    1952 (Eartha Kitt,Ronny Graham,Alice Ghostley,Carol Lawrence) (365); The
    Immoralist 1954 (James Dean, Louis Jordan,Geraldine Page for 3
    months);Matchmaker 1955 (486), Tunnel of Love 1957 (417); La Plume de Ma Tante
    1958 (835), Lord Pengo (Charles Boyer,Brian Bedford,Agnes Moorehead,Lee
    Richardson) 1962 (175); Subject Was Roses (Martin Sheen,Jack Albertson) 1964
    (832); Hughie (Jason Robards Jr) 1964 (51); Cactus Flower (Lauren Bacall,Barry
    Nelson) 1965 (1234), Man in the Glass Booth 1968; Moonchildren 1972 (16), Grease
    (2/72 to 4/80 – 3,388 performances), Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor
    Dreamcoat 1982 (747), Human Comedy (Matthew Broderick,Rex Smith) 1984, Man in
    the Glass Booth, Roza; Song and Dance (Bernadette Peters) 1985 (474); Speed the
    Plow (Madonna,Joe Mantegna,Ron Silver) 1988 (278); Lend Me a Tenor (Victor
    Garber,Philip Bosco,Tovah Feldshuh); Conversations With My Father (Judd Hirsch)
    1992; Skylight 1996 (116); Triumph of Love 1997; Art (Victor Garber,Alan
    Alda,Alfred Molina) 1998 (600); Copenhagen 2000

    Roy Arias Theater Center – 300 W 43rd St @ 8th Avenue



    Royal Roost – Harlem nightspot 1940s

    Royal Theatre – closed; demolished

    Ruben Blue Nightclub – 1940s – Julius Monk

    Ruby Theatre – closed; demolished

    *Rude Mechanicals – 2010 – one of first off broadway houses to form subscription series with 3 other theatre groups, Civilians, Talking Band, and Exchange

    Russian Tea Room – West 57th Street – 1930s – a landmark for over 75
    years – closed July 28, 2002

    Rutger Theatre – closed; demolished

    Ryan’s Stage – 128 Chambers Street

    S

    St. Anns Warehouse – 38 Water Street (between Main and Dock St for 11 years), to relocate to Civil War era tobacco warehouse on Brooklyn waterfront – got its name from its first home, Church of St. Ann’s and the Holy Trinity in Brooklyn Heights, where it performed for twenty years. Since 2001, it has been performing in DUMBO at 38 Water Street. That structure was demolished in 2012; since then, St. Ann’s has worked out a temporary residence at 29 Jay Street – Brief Encounter (transfer to Broadway); Black Watch 2011;

    St. Bart’s Playhouse – 109 East 50th Street

    *St. Clements
    Theatre (St. Clements Episcopal Church)
    – 423 West 46th St. (9 & 10th)
    (151 seats), Hogan’s Goat 1965 (607); Sexual Perversity in Chicago 1975; Juan
    Darien-a Carnival Mass 1988; Joy Luck Club 1999 (transferred to Theatre Four
    (80)

    St. George’s Theatre – glorious Staten Island vaudeville house – 1928 –
    reopened 2007 after restoration for shows and concerts

    *St.
    James Theatre
    – 246 West 44th St. (Jujamcyn- purchased from Shuberts
    in 1957 – renovated in 1958 – 1,739 seats) Opened as Erlanger in 1927 – Merry
    Malones 1927 – renamed St. James in 1932 – Walk a Little Faster (Beatrice
    Lillie) 1932 (15 weeks); Twelfth Night (Helen Hayes,Maurice Evans)1940 (129);
    Native Son 1941 (114), Oklahoma/Away We Go-original title (Alfred Drake,Celeste
    Holm) 1943 (2248), Where’s Charley (Ray Bolger) 1948 (792), Don’t Listen,Ladies
    (Constance Cummings,Denholm Elliott); King and I (Gertrude Lawrence,Doretta
    Morrow,Yul Brynner) 1951 (1246), Pajama Game 1954 (1063), L’il Abner (Tina
    Louise,Stubby Kaye,Peter Palmer,Edie Adams) 1956 (693), Flower Drum Song 1958
    (600), refurbished 1958 – Becket (Laurence Olivier,Anthony Quinn) 1960 (193); Do
    Re Mi 1960; Subways Are For Sleeping 1961; Mr. President (Anita Gillette,Robert
    Ryan,Nanette Fabray) 1962 (265), Luther 1963; Hello Dolly (Carol Channing) 1964
    (2844), Hello Dolly (Pearl Bailey,Cab Calloway) 1967; Two Gentlemen of Verona
    1971 (627), My Fair Lady (revival)(Ian Richardson,Christine Andreas) 1976 (377)-
    (original opened 3/56 to 9/62 -2,717 performances), On the 20th Century (Kevin
    Kline,Madeleine Kahn,Imogene Coca) 1978 (453), Carmelina 1979; Barnum (Jim Dale)
    1980(854), Pilobolus; My One and Only (Tommy Tune,Twiggy) 1983 (767), Jerry’s
    Girls 1985; Gypsy (Tyne Daly) 1989-90 (582)(production returned to the Marquis
    Theatre), Secret Garden 1991 (706), Secret Garden (Rebecca Luker) 1991 (706);
    The Who’s Tommy 1993; A Funny Thing Happened….(Nathan Lane) 1996 (715); High
    Society (John McMartin) 1998 (144); Civil War 1999 (61); Filumena, Musical
    Jubilee, Music Is, Producers (Nathan Lane,Matthew Broderick,Gary Beach) 2001;
    Gypsy (Patti LuPone revival) 2008; American Idiot 2010; leap of Faith (Raul Esparza) 2012; 2nd St. James – New Fifth Avenue known for
    time as St. James during early 1870s

    *St.
    John’s Church
    – 81 Christopher St.

    *St. Luke’s Church
    – 308 West 46th St.(between 8th & 9th Aves)- Late Night Catechism 1996

    *St.
    Mark’s Church in the Bowery
    – 131 East 10th St @ 2nd Avenue – Blacks

    St. Mark’s Cinema – closed

    *St. Mark’s
    Playhouse
    – Song of the Lusitanian Bogey (Moses Gunn) 1968 (NEC); Home
    (Negro Ensemble Company) 1979 (82); Blacks 1961 (1408); Cowboy and The Rock
    Garden 1964; Happy Ending/Day of Absence 1965 (504); Song of the Lusitanian
    Bogey (Negro Ensemble Company) 1968;

    St. Moritz – 50 Central Park South – 1930s had a nightclub
    St. Nick’s Pub – opened 1960s – shut down 2011

    St. Peter’s Church – 619 Lexington Avenue & 54th Street – see Theatre
    at St. Peter’s Church – home of York Theatre Company (Living Room);
    St. Peter’s
    Church (Theatre) (NYC)
    – 619 Lexington Ave @ 54th – York Theatre Company
    resident company – No Way to Treat a Lady 1996; St. Peter’s Lutheran Church
    (NYC) – 54th and Lexington Avenue – see St. Peter’s Church Theatre

    St. Regis Roof – (Maisonette) – hotel opened in 1904 at 2 East 55th
    St. – Mabel Mercer 1930s – famous nightclub

    *Salon – 49 Bleecker Street – an historic cast iron building
    (formerly a lumber yard) – home of The Culture Project

    Salon – 432 East 91st Street

    Sam H. Harris Theatre – see Candler and Harris (Candler) Theatre –
    226 West 42nd Street – opened as cinema 1914 but as Candler Theatre was
    sometimes used for plays – 1916 renamed Cohan and Harris Theatre and present
    name in 1921 – Hamlet (John Barrymore) 1922 (101 performances) – Six-Cylinder
    Love 1921 (430); Nervous Wreck 1923 (279), Icebound 1923 (170), Last Mile 1930
    (285) – became cinema again in 1932 – demolished

    Sammy’s Nightclub – 267 Bowery

    Sam. S. Shubert – see Shubert Theatre

    Sam’s (formerly Charlies) – 263 West 45th Street – restaurant and
    cabaret – popular with theatre professionals, closed for good on April 20,
    becoming the latest theatre district watering hole to be driven under by the
    soaring New York real estate market – Sam’s is the fourth low-slung, old-time
    theatre mecca to shutter in the West 40s in the past year. JR’s, on the south
    side of W. 46th Street near Eighth Avenue, ceased operations in July 2005. Its
    neighbor across the street, McHale’s, ended a 50-year run in the same location
    in January of this year. And Barrymore’s, Sam’s next-door neighbor, served its
    last drink soon after

    * Samuel Beckett Theatre – 410 West 42nd St. (9th & 10th)-
    may be demolished in 2000 to make room for modern complex containing six new
    theatres, topped by apartment tower – only the facade at 410-412 West 42nd
    Street housing Beckett and Clurman theatres would be left intact

    Samuel J. Friedman Theatre - (Biltmore Theatre renamed as of Sept 4/08) –
    261-5 West 47th St. (Nederlander 650 seats) – see also Biltmore Theatre – Good People 2011;

    Sanctuary Theatre – Jericho-Jim Crow 1964

    Sandi Shurin Theatre – 311 West 43rd Street – new home of Broken Watch
    Theatre Company

    *Sanford Meisner
    Theatre
    – 164 11th Ave (22nd & 23rd) Vortex Theatre Co. – 74 seats –
    new works by gay and lesbian writers (74); Mercury: The Afterlife and Times of a
    Rock God 1997 (216);

    San Francisco Minstrels/Music Hall – Broadway & 29th St. (493 seats)
    – had been billiard room of Gilsey Bldg – opened 1875 with minstrel troupe –
    later known as Shubert Princess Theatre, for a time called Jonah Theatre –
    Brook, or Jolly Day at the Picnic 1879 – 1890s was Hermann’s Gaiety Theatre –
    1907 converted into shops – demolished

    Sans Souci Theatre – see Niblo’s Garden

    Sarah Lawrence
    College Theatre

    Saratoga Club – Harlem – 1920s nightspot

    Sardi’s

    Sargent Theatre – see American Theatre of Actors

    Savoy – “the Little” – West 35th Street – 1910s nightspot

    Savoy – Plaza Café Lounge – 34th Street and Broadway – 1930s – famous
    nightclub

    Savoy - see Krause’s Music Hall, Schley Music Hall – Servant in the
    House 1908 (80), Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch 1904 (150), Man of the Hour
    1906 (479), Girl With Green Eyes 1902 (108), Faith Healer 1910 (13), Chorus Lady
    1906 (315) – long vanished Harlem jazz club; 2nd – Savoy Theatre (NYC) – see Hudson Theatre

    Savoy Ballroom – popular Harlem nightspot – interracial drag costume
    balls

    Schley Music Hall – 112 West 34th Street – see Savoy – 1900 – demolished
    1952

    Schoenfeld Theatre – see Plymouth Theatre

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture – Langston Hughes,
    American Negro Theatre – 515 Malcolm X Boulevard

    Schuyler Theatre – closed

    Second Avenue Theatre – Golden Land 1985 (277)

    Second Stage
    Theatre
    – 307 West 43rd Street (@ 8th Avenue)- opened April 1999 –
    located in an old bank building – box office is placed in the old vault – Film
    Society (Nathan Lane) 1988 (31); Chesapeake 1999; Jar the Floor 1999; Saturday
    Night (Stephen Sondheim) 2000; Jitney 2000 – transferred to Union Square Theatre – currently use the 296 seat theatre and additional 108 seat McGinn/Cazale – 2012 to purchase 597 Helen Hayes Theatre and begin producing there in 2013 – Founded in 1979 under the leadership of Artistic Director Carole Rothman – produces a diverse range of premieres and new interpretations of America’s best contemporary theatre, including Tiny Alice and Peter and Jerry by Edward Albee; The Good Times Are Killing Me by Lynda Barry; The Little Dog Laughed by Douglas Carter Beane; Little Murders by Jules Feiffer; The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee by William Finn and Rachel Sheinkin; A Soldier’s Play by Charles Fuller; Afterbirth: Kathy & Mo’s Greatest Hits by Mo Gaffney and Kathy Najimy; Becky Shaw by Gina Gionfriddo; Painting Churches and Coastal Disturbances by Tina Howe; Ricky Jay and His 52 Assistants and On the Stem by Ricky Jay; Next to Normal by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey; Living Out by Lisa Loomer; This Is Our Youth and The Waverly Gallery by Kenneth Lonergan; Some Men by Terrence McNally; By the Way, Meet Vera Stark by Lynn Nottage; eurydice by Sarah Ruhl; Everyday Rapture by Dick Scanlan and Sherie Rene Scott; Let Me Down Easy by Anna Deavere Smith; Saturday Night by Stephen Sondheim; Crowns by Regina Taylor; Uncommon Women and Others by Wendy Wasserstein; Spoils of War by Michael Weller; Before It Hits Home, Jar the Floor and Birdie Blue by Cheryl L. West; Jitney by August Wilson; Lemon Sky, Serenading Louie and Sympathetic Magic by Lanford Wilson; and Metamorphoses and The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci by Mary Zimmerman.

    Selwyn Theatre – see American Airlines Theatre – 229 West 42nd St –
    1918 – opened with Information, Please (Jane Cowl) 1918 (46); The Crowded Hours;
    Buddies 1919; Tickle Me 1920; The Circle 1921 (Mrs. Leslie Carter); Partners
    Again (Potash and Perlmutter) 1922; first success Mr. Battling Butler 1923;
    Helen of Troy, New York 1923 (6 mos); Charlot Revue (Beatrice Lillie, Gertrude
    Lawrence,Jack Buchanan) 1925; Royal Family 1927 (196); This Year of Grace (Bea
    Lillie,Noel Coward) 1928; Wake Up and Dream (Cole Porter) 1929; Three’s a Crowd;
    became cinema early 1930s – Respectful Prostitute 1950; Ladies Night in a
    Turkish Bath; -Hairy Ape (Willem Dafoe) 1997 – Roundabout Theatre Co. has
    completed its historic restoration of the Selwyn Theater on 42nd Street. Second
    Stage Theater, the neighborhood’s newest theater recently opened at Eighth
    Avenue and 43rd Street

    *78th St. Theatre
    Lab
    – see Stand Upstairs Theatre – Man in the Flying Lawnchair 2000

    79th Street Theatre – closed

    72nd Street East Theatre – closed & demolished

    77th Street Theatre – closed

    Sex Fantasy Theatre - 8th Avenue @ 42nd St

    Shakespeare and Company

    Shakespeare Hotel – corner of Nassau and Fulton Sts – favourite rendezvous
    for theatrical profession

    Shakespeare Theatre – see Jolson’s 59th St. Theatre
    a href=”http://www.sheencenter.org”>Sheen Center – 18 Bleecker St – opens May 1/14 with 2 theatre spaces – 250 seat Loretto Auditorium and 93 seat Black Box – Companies who have already signed on to use The Sheen Center include The New York International Fringe Festival, Strange Sun Theater, |the claque|, Terranova, Wingspan Arts, MorDance and Voyager Theater Company
    Sheridan Square Playhouse – see Circle Repertory – Leave It To Jane
    1959 (928), View From the Bridge (Robert Duvall,Jon Voight) 1965(780); Love and
    Let Love 1968; Man With the Flower in His Mouth/License/Jar (Danny DeVito) 1969;
    Present Tense (Come Next Tuesday/Twas Brillig/So Please Be Kind)(Biff Maguire)
    1972 (8)

    Sherry’s – 300 Park Avenue @ 49th Street – 1900s nightspot

    Show Boats – floating playhouses brough theatre to towns along the great
    rivers of the U.S. – 1815 group of actors went from Pittsburgh to Kentucky on
    the Allegheny – plays presented on board boats as early as 1817 – Floating
    Theatre (1831-Pittsburgh to New Orleans) – late 1830s and early 1840s ventures
    were tried on Erie Canal – 1845 New Yorkers and Brooklynites could enjoy the
    Great North River Opera House at foot of Spring Street – 2000 seats – Floating
    Circus Palace (1851); Will S. Hays (1869); French’s New Sensation (1878); Water
    Queen (1885-used in 1936 film Show Boat)

    Show Shop Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre
    Shrine – Harlem jazz venue

    Shubert Alley – famous theatrical thoroughfare between 44th and 45th
    Streets

    *Shubert/Sam
    S. Shubert Theatre
    – 225 West 44th St. (1,449 seats) named for Sam S.
    Shubert who was killed in a train crash – opened 1913 with Hamlet (as of Sept 29/13 theatre is 100 years old; A Thousand
    Years Ago 1914 – Maytime 1917 (492), Copperhead 1918 (120), Vogues of 1924 (Fred
    Allen)(3 mos); Night in Venice (choreographed by Busby Berkeley) 1929 (22
    weeks); Dodsworth (Walter Huston,Fay Bainter) 1934 (131); Idiot’s Delight (Alred
    Lunt,Lynn Fontanne) 1936 (299), Babes in Arms 1937 (289); I Married an Angel
    (Dennis King,Vivienne Segal,Audrey Christie,Walter Slezak) 1938(42 weeks);
    Philadelphia Story (Katharine Hepburn,Van Heflin,Shirley Booth,Joseph Cotten)
    1939 (417), Hang On To Your Hat with Al Jolson 1940; Higher and Higher 1940;
    Louisiana Purchase 1940; By Jupiter 1942; Othello (Paul Robeson,Uta Hagen) 1943
    (295); Bloomer Girl 1944 (654), Anne of the Thousand Days (Joyce Redman,Rex
    Harrison) 1948 (288), I Know,My Love (Alfred Lunt,Lynn Fontanne) 1949; Paint
    Your Wagon 1951; Can Can 1953 (892), Pipe Dream (Helen Trauble) 1955 (246);
    Bells Are Ringing (Judy Holliday,Sidney Chaplin) 1956 (924), Whoop Up 1958; Take
    Me Along (Jackie Gleason) 1959; Majority of One (Gertrude Berg) 1959 (556); Gay
    Life (Barbara Cook, Walter Chiari) 1961; Stop the World I Want to Get Off
    (Anthony Newley) 1962 (555); I Can Get It For You Wholesale (Barbra
    Streisand,Elliot Gould) 1962, Here’s Love 1963; Bajour (Chita Rivera) 1964; Roar
    of the Greasepaint, The Smell of the Crowd 1965; Apple Tree (Barbara Harris,Alan
    Alda,Allan Arkin)1966; Promises Promises 1968 (1281), Golden Rainbow (Eydie
    Gorme,Steve Lawrence) 1968 (385); Crazy for You (822+ ); Evening With Richard
    Nixon (George S. Irving) 1972 (2 weeks); Little Night Music 1973 (601),
    Sondheim: A Musical Tribute 1973; Over Here 1974; A Chorus Line 1975 (10/75 to
    4/90 – 6,137 performances) ran for 11 years, Evening of Music and Song, Tony
    Awards; Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story 1990 (225); Crazy For You 1992; Big 1996
    (192);Gypsy (Bernadette Peters)2003 (347);Chicago 1996; Spamalot 2005; Memphis 2010;

    Signature Centre – 480 W
    42nd Street near 10th Ave – not-for-profit company committed to one playwright
    per season will move into the base of a 58-story (still-under-construction) high
    rise on 42nd Street, aiming for a 2011 residency – hotel and residential
    building will house the company, which will operate three theatres in what will
    be called The Signature Center (including a 199-seat flexible space, a 199-seat
    fixed space and a 299-seat fixed space). A café, bookstore, lobby, office and
    rehearsal space are all part of the plan – see also Signature Theatre – The center, is opening on Jan 31/12 with a production of Athol Fugard’s “Blood Knot,” includes three theaters,
    an expansive cafe and bookstore space, with sofas, open to the public (and free WiFi), and a gleaming glass marquee that
    newly lights a stretch of West 42nd Street near 10th Avenue. (Signature’s former home, a single theater located a block
    farther west, away from Times Square, is seeking new tenants.)

    Signature Theatre Company/Peter
    Norton Space
    – 555 West 42nd St.(between 10th & 11th Aves) – (160
    seats) – see Peter Norton Space – home of Signature Theatre Company – lease to
    expire – winner of 2014 Tony Award for best regional theatre

    Silver Slipper – 1920s nightspot

    Silver Star Playhouse – closed

    68th Street Playhouse – closed

    62nd & Broadway Theatre – 1871 Broadway

    63rd Street Music Hall – 22 West 63rd Street – 1909 – 1024 seats –
    built for presentation of biblical movies and lectures – 1919 began showing
    movies for children – not successful – renamed Cort’s 63rd Street, but changed
    back very shortly – Mixed Marriage 1921; Shuffle Along (Eubie Blake, Josephine
    Baker)1921 (504); Dolly Jordan; Liza (21 weeks); Keep Shuffling (Fats Waller)
    1928; Yellow Jacket 1928; name changed 10 times in 30 years – became many
    different names during the 1930s alone – Lady Windemere’s Fan 1932; Chalk Dust
    1936; On the Rocks (George Bernard Shaw); Ghost for Sale 1941- then became
    Daly’s 63rd Street – then became the Coburn – Recital, Park Lane, Gilmore’s 63rd
    Street, the Experimental – by 1938 the theatre was once again Daly’s 63rd Street
    – 1957 the theatre was demolished

    Skirball Center – 850
    seats – opened Oct 2003

    >a href=”http://www.americanrepertorytheater.org/events/show/sleep-no-more”>Sleep No More – 530 W 27th St – mixes experimental theatre with classic Shakespeare – 100,000 square foot space – whole theatrical evening – space was once Twilo

    Small’s Paradise
    135th Street and 7th Avenue – popular Harlem nightspot with beautiful showgirls
    and dancing waiters –1920s – long vanished Harlem jazz club;

    Snapple Theater Center – 1627 Broadway at 50th Street – Perfect Crime 2005
    – Snapple Theater Center will officially open as the refreshing home for two
    Off-Broadway shows: Perfect Crime, the longest-running play in New York City
    history with 7,764 performances to date, now playing in the 4th floor theater,
    and The Fantasticks, the world’s longest-running musical, beginning previews
    Friday, July 28/06. Together, the two theaters provide seating for up to 398
    people

    Snookie’s – 1950s nightspot

    Socialist’s Press Club

    Society of American Dramatists and Composers – founded 1890

    Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers – founded 1959

    Sofia’s Downstairs Theatre

    *Soho Playhouse
    – 15 Vandam Street (198 seats) (between 6th and Varick) – Killer Joe
    (Scott Glenn,Amanda Plummer) 1998 – newly renovated and refurbished theatre
    reopens Oct/04

    *Soho Repertory
    Company/Walkerspace
    – 46 Walker St. (Between Church St. and Broadway)-
    one of N.Y. oldest non-profit theatres (100)

    *Solo Arts Group – 36 West 17th St., 5th Floor

    Song of Singapore Theatre – Song of Singapore 1991

    Sophia’s – 221 W 46th Street – Located beneath a popular Theater District eatery, this cabaret-style venue was the former home of the campy Tony and Tina’s Wedding – rents out to a variety of tourist-friendly theater events – Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating(10);

    Sophies – 318 West 53rd, between 8th and 9th

    Southpaw – rock club

    South Street Theatre – One Man Band 1985; People Who Could Fly 1989
    (41)

    Southwark Theatre – Much Ado About Nothing 1789

    Sparrow’s Chinese Pagoda – mid 1800s – Five Points (Park,Worth & Orange
    (Baxter later) Streets – nightclub, opium den, and theater – Chinese opera,
    acrobats (depicted in film Gangs of New York)

    Spindeltop Cabaret - Frances Faye

    Spirit of the Times – theatrical newspaper founded 1831

    Spivy’s Roof – intimate cabaret – Paul Lynde (1951)

    Splash Bar – 50 West 17th St
    – between 5th & 6th (Chelsea) – gay bar and dance club – Music Theatre Mondays program

    Spotlight Club – 52nd Street – 1940s nightclub

    Square East Theatre – Decline and Fall of the Entire World as Seen
    Through the Eyes of Cole Porter Revisited 1965

    Stadium Theatre – closed; demolished

    Stadt Theatre – see Bowery Theatre

    Stage Door Canteen – Broadway and 44th – opened 1942 at 216 W 44th St – cabaret and dining
    room designed in WWII to entertain soldiers in uniform – originally basement of 44th Street
    Theatre – plaque on West 44th Street – see Weber and Fields Music Hall – formerly occupied by the Little Club. The Little Club was opened in 1917 as a members-only after-theatre hangout and dance club. It was the scene of many raids and arrests during Prohibition, not all of them having to do with liquor violations.

    Stage I and II @ City Centre – 131 West 55th St.
    Stage 72 – Gilbert Gottfried, Susie Essman

    Stage 73 – Best Foot Forward (Liza Minelli) 1963 (224); Tom Paine –
    demolished

    Stage Women’s War Relief – founded during WWI – disbanded at end of war

    Stair and Havlin – large chain of theatres extending from East Coast to
    Kansas City
    Stage 72 – 158 W 72nd Street – formerly Triad Theater – becomes Stage 72 in November 2013
    Stand

    *Stand Upstairs
    Theatre
    – 236 West 78th St. (78th St. Theatre Lab)

    Standard Theatre – West side of Broadway between 32nd & 33rd at
    Harold Square (1,126 seats) – opened as the Eagle in 1875 – renamed Standard
    1879 – H.M.S. Pinafore (175 nights) – 1883 destroyed by fire – rebuilt 1884 and
    in 1896 renamed the Manhattan – Robin Hood 1891 (40) – demolished 1909 to make
    way for Gimbel’s Department Store
    Stanhope Park Hyatt – 995 Fifth Avenue – opened a new cabaret room late
    2002
    Stanley Theatre – closed; demolished

    *Stardust
    – 1650 Broadway @ 51st – located in basement of Ellen’s Stardust Diner, next
    door to the Winter Garden – has housed Forbidden Broadway Cleans Up Its Act 1998

    Star Theatre – NE corner of Broadway & 13th St (1,448 seats) –
    opened 1861 as Wallack’s – became the Star in 1882 – Shenandoah 1889 (250)
    demolished 1901

    Starr Theatre – see Lincoln Centre, Alice Tully Hall

    Starwwood Aloft Hotel – new hotel in Harlem, first since famed Theresa Hotel closed in 1967

    State Theatre – Times Square – 1921-1987 – 1540 Broadway –
    demolished for office bldg; Virgin megastore – Loew’s State Theatre 4 in
    basement

    Steinway Hall – 14th Street on Union Square (1,256 seats) –
    demolished

    Stella Adler Theatre – 419 Lafayette St. (4th & Astor Place)

    http://sondheimtheater.com/”>Stephen Sondheim Theatre – 124 W 43rd St – former Henry Miller’s Theatre – Roundabout has a long term lease for this 1,055 seat theatre – Pee Wee Herman Show Sept 2010; Anything Goes 2011;

    Steve McGraw’s Supper Club – renamed Triad Theatre – Forever Plaid
    1990(over 1700 performances)

    Stock Companies – organized groups of players who performed single play
    for limited run before proceeding to next work – 1840s – began to fade in 1890s

    Stoddard Theatre – closed; demolished

    Stonewall Bistro – 113 Seventh Avenue South – cabaret

    Stoppani’s Arcade Baths – see Palmos’s Opera House

    Storefront Blitz Theatre – 506 West 42nd St – Omelettes and Champagne 1981

    *Stork Club
    – 3 East 53rd Street – speakeasy with entertainment – literary and theatre crowd
    – 1930s – The Stork Club, Copacabana, Latin Quarter, Persian Room–meccas where songwriters, singers and starry society mingled and fueled American popular music. Deborah Grace Winer conjures the brassy spots and smoky boîtes that were the musical playpens for artists from the Gershwins and Ethel Merman to Sammy Cahn and the Rat Pack.

    Storm Theatre

    Strand Music Hall – later became The Gaiety Theatre – 1860s; 2nd – Strand
    Theatre (NYC) – 47th & B’Way -Times Square – designed by Thomas Lamb 1914-1986 –
    2,756 seats – O’Connor Sisters- demolished

    *Studio
    – 145 West 46th St. (6th & 7th) (American Globe; Next Stage; Turnip -all
    resident companies)

    Studio B - rock club – Greenpoint

    Studio Cinemas – closed; demolished

    Studio Dante – 257 West
    29th St – a converted storefront store of an old four-story brick building on
    fringe of Midtown’s Fur District – 65-seat theater of surprising jewelbox-style
    luxury – Baptism by Fire 2004 opening production

    *Studio 54/Upstairs at Studio 54
    – see also New Yorker Theatre; – 254 West 54th St. – opened as Gallo Opera
    House 1927 with San Carlo Opera – La Boheme 1927 – theatre renamed New Yorker,
    then Casino de Paree by Billy Rose, then Federal Music Hall, although theatre
    continued to be known as the New Yorker – Swing Mikado – 1942 became studio –
    1976 became Studio 54 – bought by Roundabout 1998, known as Kit Kat Club for run
    of Cabaret (revival opened at Kit Kat Klub (Henry Miller) moved here –closed
    Jan/04 – 1,004 seats)- former discotheque of the 1970s – will become Roundabout’s
    third house in Manhattan’s theatre district, holding a long-term lease on the
    American Airlines Theatre – the Broadway house at 227 West 42nd Street formerly
    known as the Selwyn and currently renovating the space at 111 West 46th Street –
    known as the American Place Theatre – Assassins 2004 Tony Award Best Revival
    2004; Sondheim on Sondheim 2010; People in the Picture 2011;

    Studio No. 52 – see Gallo Opera House

    Studio L – see Raw Space

    Studio No. 62 – see Biltmore Theatre

    Studio Theatre – see also Where
    Eagles Dare Theatre – 347 West 36th Street – both theatres hold 40-50

    Stuyvesant Theatre – built 1906 and opened with Grand Army Man
    (David Belasco) and in 1910 renamed the Belasco Theatre

    Sugar Cane Club – famous speakeasy at 2212 135th Street – 1920s

    Sugar Ray’s – Harlem nightclub of the 1950s

    Sullivan-Considine Circuit – vaudeville chain founded 1902

    Sullivan, Harris and Woods – founded 1899 as producers of cheap, touring
    melodramas

    Sullivan Street Lounge – 189 Sullivan St. (Bleecker & Houston)

    *Sullivan Street Playhouse
    – 181 Sullivan St. (between Houston & Bleeker Sts) – 144 seats – 39 of its 40 year
    history has been running The Fantasticks (opened May 3, 1960 – closed January
    2002)- to become 5 storey condo 2006

    Summer Stock – first half of 19th Century – summer playhouses began to
    attract playgoers – ie. Chatham Garden had popular theatre in 1820s; Niblo’s
    Garden 1830s

    Summer Theatre – Greenwich Street

    Sunset Theatre – 125th Street – between Morningside and Manhattan
    Avenues – now L Gree Baptist Church

    Sun Sing Theatre – closed; demolished

    Sunshine Cinema – open


    Supper Club
    240 West 47th Street – inviting nightclub venue earlier
    known as the Edison Theatre – see also King Kong Room

    Surf Reality
    – 172 Allen St.,2nd Floor (used for comedy showcases for HBO) (50)

    Surfside Theatre – Rockaway Beach, Queens

    Susan Bloch Theatre – Ten Percent Revue 1988

    Susan Stein Shivz Theatre – see Vasser College

    Sutton Theatre – closed; demolished

    Swan’s Paradise – Harlem – demolished

    Swing Club – 35 West 52nd Street – 1930s nightclub

    *Sylvia
    and Danny Kaye Playhouse
    – 695 Park Avenue (Hunter College)

    *Symphony Space – 2537
    Broadway at 95th Street – built 1915 as 95th Street Market – Symphony Space for
    22 years, also houses New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players – (800 seats) –
    plans to incorporate the Thalia Theatre (175 seats) and will reopen as the Peter
    Norton Symphony Space

    Synchronicity Theatre Group
    - 55 Mercer St. (between Broome & Grand Streets) – 7 resident theatre
    companies

    T

    Tab Shows – name given to travelling shows, often cut-down versions of
    Broadway shows

    TADA! Theater – 120 West 28th Street

    Taft Hotel – famous nightclub

    Talking Band – off broadway theatre group – 2010 – one of first off broadway houses to form subscription series with 3 other theatre groups, Civilians, Exchange, and Rude Mechs

    Tammany Hall – 44 Union Square East – founded 1789 at corner of Frankfurt and Nassau – mid 1800s – Five Points (Park,Worth & Orange
    (Baxter later) Streets – sometimes used for theatricals (depicted in film Gangs
    of New York); Tony Pastor moved his theatre operations here before opening on
    14th Street (see Tony Pastor’s New Fourteenth Street Theatre) – may undergo a major renovation including the removal of its theatre and the addition of a large glass dome, according to DNA Info – In the 1960s the New York County Democratic Committee dropped the name Tammany; and the Tammany Society, which had been forced for financial reasons to sell the last Tammany Hall on Union Square – 231 Broadway – Built in 1929 to house the Democratic Party machine, the former Tammany Hall headquarters is currently home to the New York Film Academy, a liquor store, a smokeshop and a deli – building’s theatre, which is rented out for various productions, will be replaced with retail and offices, a spokeswoman for BKSK Architects told DNA Info

    Tams-Witmark – leading source for rental of musicals – founded 1920s

    Tank Theatre – Theatre Row – as
    of 2005 Douglas Fairbanks Theatre, Tank and John Houseman Theatre are being
    vacated in preparation for demolition
    Tappan Zee Playhouse – see Nyack NY

    Tattersall’s Stables – razed 1850 – see Fellows Opera House

    Tavaru - 192 Third Avenue (between 17th and 18th Streets) – new bar venue
    – becoming theatre venue as well
    TBG Theatre – 312 W 36th St – home of Barrow Group Theatre Co – same building as Abingdon Theatre Co and Workshop Theater

    Ted Hook’s Backstage – see Backstage

    Television Studio No 50
    – see Hammerstein’s Theatre

    Temple Theatre - see Proctor’s 23rd St Theatre – 7th Ave & W 23rd St

    Tenement Theatre – 97 Orchard St. 1870s was a saloon – opened in
    1998

    Tent Shows – early 19th Centrury offering mistrel shows, vaudeville,
    drama, comedy and musicals – as many as 400 tent companies touring by 1920

    Ten-Twent’-Thirt’ – name given to popular priced theatres and touring
    companies in late 19th and early 20th Century

    Terrace Theatre – closed & demolished

    Texas Pavillion – World’s Fair New York 1964 – To Broadway With Love
    1964

    Thalia Spanish Theatre

    Thalia Spanish Theatre – 41-17 Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside

    Thalia Theatre – 1877 – see Bowery Theatre – see Symphony Space –
    Mlle Francoise Hotin was featured – see Bowery Theatre
    Theater Center – 601 8th Avenue – new off Broadway theatre center to open in 2014, with 3 theatres, 99 seats, 199 seats, and 249 seats – to include a box office, small restaurant or bar on the ground floor – the theatres will be located on the second floor

    Theatre – Beekman (Chapel) St – 1761 – damaged beyond repair; 2nd –
    Theatre – Cruger’s Wharf – 1758; 3rd – Theatre – John Street – 1767 – American
    Company of Comedians – abandoned 1799 – renamed Theatre Royal; 4th – Theatre –
    Nassau Street – Company of Comedians 1750; 5th – Theatre – Pearl Street and
    Maiden Lane – in Van Dam building – demolished and new theatre built 1753 – sole
    1758 to Calvinist congregation – razed 1765 – another church erected on site;
    6th – Theatre – 242 Water Street, between Beekman St & Peck Slip

    Theatre at Noon – What’s a Nice Country Like You Doing in a State
    Like This? 1972

    *Theatre at St.
    Clements
    – see St. Clements Church

    *Theatre at
    St. Peter’s Church
    – Citicorp Center (Lexington Ave & 54th St.)- 147
    seats – Show Goes On 1997; Jello is Always Red 1998

    Theatre at West Park Church (Frog and Peach Theatre Co) – 165 West
    86th St. (Amsterdam)

    Theatre Buildings – Greek theatres were open air cut out of hillsides,
    usually facing the sea (5th Century B.C.); Roman theatres were built on the flat
    and amphitheatres were built for chariot races and gladiator combats, but the
    destruction of the Roman Empire saw collapse of organized theatre – it was
    reborn in liturgical dramas given in churches, and later open air either in
    front of churches, or the marketplace on raised platforms; Renaissance brought
    great change to theatre design, now indoors on temporary stages of halls or
    palaces through the 16th Century. Proscenium arch innovation 16th Century Italy
    and opera and ballet evolved horseshoe shaped auditoriums (Teatro Olympico at
    Vincenza 1585; Sabionetta 1589; Teatro Farnese at Parma 1619); Early French
    theatres were long and narrow (1540s); unroofed playhouses of Elizabethan
    England i.e. Theatre, Fortune, Rose and The Globe; Italian architects dominated
    building all over the continent during 17th Century; In London after the
    Restoration, theatres were modelled on European pattern like Dorset Garden
    (1671); Drury Lane (1674); Lincoln’s Inn Fields (1714); Covent Garden (1732));
    Grand staircases, foyers and porticos began with opera houses of Germany and
    later Italy, to be taken up by legitimate theatres only in 19th Century; a boom
    in theatre building worldwide after 1800; Germany led world in theatre design up
    until World War I, but the boom in cinema architecture led to theatres like the
    Duchess (London 1929); Cambridge (1930); and Saville (1931); In United States
    Pasadena Playhouse (1925); Ziegfeld (New York 1927); and Radio City Music Hall
    (1932) – later experimental-like theatres-in-the-round and flexible staging e.g.
    Circle in the Square (New York 1960 and 1972); Arena Stage (Washington 1961);
    more dominant theme was the thrust stage like Stratford Festival (Ontario 1953,
    rebuilt 1957); Guthrie Theatre (1963) – 1970s developed the small workshop
    theatre i.e. National Theatre (London 1976)

    Theatre Comique – 514 Broadway (1,164 seats) – see Wood’s Minstrel
    Hall, Henry Wood’s Minstrel Hall – Mulligan Guard’s Ball 1879 (138), Cordelia’s
    Aspirations 1883 (176) – demolished; 2nd Theatre Comique – 728 Broadway – was
    Unitarian Church of the Messiahp – took over as theatre 1881 – bldg burned down
    1884 – not rebuilt

    Theatre Communications Group – founded 1961 to serve needs of regional
    theatre movement

    Theatre De Lys – 121 Christopher Street – formerly a cinema – opened
    1952 – later changed to Lucille Lortel – Threepenny Opera 1954 (2611), Brecht on
    Brecht (Lotte Lenya,Viveca Linfors, Dane Clark,Anne Jackson) 1962 (424); Now is
    the Time for All Good Men 1967; Deer Park (Rip Torn,Marsha Mason) 1967 (128);
    Whispers on the Wind 1970; Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill 1972; Life in the
    Theatre (Ellis Rabb) 1977 (288); Buried Child 1978 (152), Cloud 9 1981 (971);
    Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me 1992 (175)

    Theatre Development Fund – founded 1967 – see TKTS

    Theatre East – Forbidden Broadway 1990; Forbidden Broadway 1991½
    1991

    Theatre 80 St. Marks – You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 1967 (1597)

    Theatre for a New Audience/Polonsky Shakespeare Center – opening its first permanent home in Oct 2013 – 262 Ashland Place, between Lafayette and Fulton Streets – Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg on Feb. 3/05
    unveiled architects Frank Gehry and Hugh Hardy’s collaborative design for
    Theatre for a New Audience’s new home in the emerging BAM Cultural District in
    Downtown Brooklyn – will be the first theatre to be constructed in the new
    district – 299-seat flexible theatre, a 50-seat rehearsal/performance space, a
    café, offices, and a roof garden – starts Oct 19/13 with A Midsummer Night’s Dream – opens Nov 2/13

    *Theatre for the
    New City
    - 155 First Avenue, between 9th and 10th – currently 4 theatres (Seward and Joyce Johnson, Cino, Cabaret and Community Space (240
    seats & 60 seats); home to Bread and Puppet Theatre, Mabou Mines, Thunderbird American Indian Dancers, Lesser America and other groups

    Theatre Four – 424 West 55th Street – Negro Ensemble Co – Zooman and the
    Sign 1981

    Theatre Francais – known as French Theatre – N side of 14th St between 6th
    and 7th Aves – 1866 – later Haverly’s Minstrels – known as 14th Street Theatre –
    dark from 1911-26 – 1926 became Civic Repertory Theatre (Eva Le Gallienne) –
    demolished 1938
    Theatre Genesis – see also Living Theatre

    Theatre Hall of Fame – see Uris/George Gershwin Theatre

    *Theatre 4(WPP)
    – Two Can Play (Negro Ensemble Co) 1985; – Boys From Syracuse 1963
    (500)- see also Actor’s Playhouse – 424 West 55th St. (between 9th & 10th Aves)
    (254 seats) – Soldier’s Play (NEC) 1981 (468), Boys in the Band 1968 (1000),
    Picnic on the Battlefield, Boys From Syracuse (500), All Night Strut 1979;
    Housewives’ Cantata 1980; Rhinoceros (revival) 1996; Perfect Crime – transferred
    to Duffy Theatre – demolished

    Theatre Francaise – 105 West 14th St – see Civic Repertory Theatre
    and 14th Street Theatre

    Theatre Guild – see Harrigan’s Theatre, Virginia Theatre – founded
    1919 – used various venues i.e. Garrick before opening its own theatre, Guild
    Theatre in 1925 – but still used other theatres – Lucky One (Dennis King) 1922;
    Merchant of Glory 1925 (42); Game of Love and Death (Claude Rains,Otto
    Krueger,Henry Fonda) 1929 (6 weeks); Biography (Ina Claire,Laurence Olivier)
    1932 (283);

    Theatre in Mount Vernon Gardens

    Theatre in Nassau Street

    Theatre League

    Theatre Library Association – founded 1937

    Theatre Marquee – La Ronde – She Shall Have Music 1959 – demolished

    Theatre Masque – 252 West 45th St – 1927 – changed to John Golden
    Theatre – Puppets of Passion

    Theatre of Action – 1930s

    Theater Off Park – Most Men Are 1995

    Theatre of Young America - see Majestic Theatre

    Theatre of the Riverside Church – 120th Street & Riverside Drive

    Theatre on Cruger’s Wharf

    Theatre on the Park

    Theatre on 3 – 10 West 18th Street

    Theatre Parisien – see Norworth Theatre

    Theatre Republic – 1900 – also Hammerstein’s Theatre Republic – 207
    West 42nd Street – (973 seats) – opened with Sag Harbor (Lionel Barrymore) 1900;
    In the Palace of the King 1900 (6 mos); see Republic – renamed Belasco in 1902 –
    Leah Kleschna 1904 (131); Warrens of Virginia (Cecil B. DeMille and Mary
    Pickford) 1907; 1910 back to Theatre Republic – A Good Little Devil (Mary
    Pickford) 1913; Common Clay (Jane Cowl) 1915 (316); Lilac Time; Parlor, Bedroom,
    and Bath; Sign on the Door; Abie’s Irish Rose transferred here from Fulton
    Theatre in 1922 (2,327 performances); My Girl Friday; Billy Minsky took over as
    burlesque house 1931 to 1942 – Gentle People (Sam Jaffe,Franchot Tone) 1939 –
    changed to Victory Theatre and showed films – Kiss Them For Me (Judy
    Holliday,Richard Widmark,Paul Ford) 1945 (111); closed for restoration in early
    1990s costing 11.4 million-reopened as New Victory in 1995

    Theatre Row – group of small theatres on South side of 42nd Street between
    9th and 10th Avenues – established in mid-1970s – 410-412 West 42nd Street – 5
    theatres under one roof – Lion (88 seats); Kirk (99 seats); Beckett (99 seats);
    Clurman (99 seats) and the Acorn (199 seats)- featuring groups like New Group,
    Labyrinth Theatre Company, and MCC Theatre which lost home on West 28th Street

    *Theatre Row Theatre
    – 424 West 42nd St. (9th & 10th)-

    Theatre-Studio – 750 Eighth Avenue, 2nd Floor

    *Theatre Ten Ten
    – 1010 Park Avenue (84th & 85th)- in the basement of a church

    *Theatre
    3/Melting Pot
    – 311 West 43rd St (between 8th & 9th Aves)- 96 seats

    *Theatre 22
    – 54 West 22nd Street (between 5th & 6th)- 40 seats

    Theatre Union – formed 1932 to mount plays of social significance –
    disbanded 1937

    Theatre Unique – 1908 – sideshows

    Therapy – gay bar in Hell’s Kitchen – cabaret some evenings


    Thirteenth Street Repertory Company
    – see also Thirteenth Street
    Theatre


    Thirteenth Street Theater
    – 50 West 13th Street – bottom floor of a
    townhouse

    *13th Street
    Repertory Company
    - 50 West 13th St. (between 5th and 6th) – been
    performing Israel Horovitz’s “Line” for 25 years

    34th Sreet East Theatre – closed

    39th Street Theatre – 119 West 39th St – 1910 –Nazimova opened in
    Little Eyolf (6 weeks) – named Nazimova’s 39th Street – see Nazimova Theatre –
    Little Eyolf 1910 – became 39th Street in 1911 – Unchastened Woman 1915 (193),
    Is Zat So 1925 (618), Caught – Welded (Doris Keane,Jacob Ben-Ami) 1924 (3
    weeks); Is Zat So 1925 (618) – demolished 1925

    37 Arts Theatre – 450 West 37th Street – 399 seats – inaugural production
    2004 – Immigrant

    Three Deuces – 77 West 52nd St – 1930s nightclub

    Tilles
    Center for the Performing Arts

    Times Square – Turns 100 Years Old April, 2004 – one hundred years ago, on
    April 8, 1904, New York City bid adieu to Longacre Square, which had no
    particular reputation, and said hello to Times Square, which soon developed
    quite a reputation indeed – The Times also, in 1904, inaugurated the tradition
    of an open-air welcoming of New Year’s Eve – – the area eventually became best
    known for, of course, was theatre. The stage got a jump on the New York Times,
    as far laying a claim to the neighborhood’s booming future. The Casino, the very
    first theatre in what would become the city’s latest and most lasting theatre
    district, opened in 1882. It was followed by the Broadway, Empire, American,
    Abbey’s, Olympia, Victoria, Republic, Circle, Majestic, Lyric, Lyceum, Hudson,
    and New Amsterdam-all of which opened before the name Times Square was coined –
    Republic, Lyceum, Hudson and New Amsterdam still stand. (Parts of the Lyric were
    incorporated into the Ford Center for the Performing Arts.) The Republic reborn
    as the New Victory, and New Amsterdam was reclaimed by Disney. Hudson hasn’t
    been used as legitimate stage since 1968. Among Broadway theatres who knew both
    Longacre and Times Squares, only the Lyceum has seen constant use as a theatre –
    nostalgically named Longacre Theatre was built in 1913



    Times Square Brewery - 210
    West 42nd Street (between 7th and 8th) – 350 seats – new live music venue

    Times Square Paramount – built in 1926 by Rapp & Rapp (3,664 seats )-
    demolished

    Times Square Theatre – 217 W. 42nd St. built 1920 (1057 seats)- between 7th & 8th – (500
    seats) – opened with The Mirage 1920 (6 mos); Fata Morgana 1920 (6 months); Demi-Virgin
    (8mos); original productions Andre Charlot’s Revue of 1921 (Jack
    Buchanan,Gertrude Lawrence,Beatrice Lillie) 1924; Dear Sir (Jerome Kern) 1924; Battling Butler 1924;
    Enemy 1925 (203); Mirage 1920; Demi-Virgin, Private Lives (256), Fool 1922
    (360), Andre Charlot’s Revue of 1924 (Gertrude Lawrence,Beatrice Lillie); Front
    Page 1928 (276), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes 1926 (199), Front Page 1928 (281);
    Strike Up The Band (Gershwin) 1930 (191), Private Lives (Noel Coward,Gertrude
    Lawrence,Laurence Olivier) 1931 (256); Forsaking All Others (Tallulah Bankhead)
    1933 (13 weeks) – reopened 1934 as a movie house – 1940 a retail store was
    constructed on the stage area – was also entrance to Apollo Theatre – 1980s Kung Fu films – closed early 1990s – the last of the dormant legit theatres to be renovated to house a starry, “immersive” film experience that celebrates the history of Broadway musicals – 100-foot façade of the Times Square, next door to the 42nd Street entrance of Foxwoods Theater, boasts a handsome colonnade, which is often obscured by billboard-style advertising – renovated for new multimedia show — Broadway Sensation — A 4D Musical Spectacular- theatre stopped offering plays and musicals by the 1930s. Movies and retail were part of its life over the following decades; the stage was torn out years ago to accommodate retail stores. The auditorium’s last regular audiences appeared in the mid-1990s, when slasher movies were shown 10 AM-midnight – full and classic restoration to return the theatre to its historic glory – theatre to open in late Spring or early summer of 2013 – film experience will feature “the greatest songs from the greatest Broadway musicals, penned by the most famous songwriters, including Rodgers and Hammerstein, Kander and Ebb, Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin as well as many others” and “will be performed by Broadway and Hollywood stars.” It’s billed as “a spectacular immersive experience.”
    website cinematreasures.org has a collection of photos of the Times Square Theater – plans for the highly anticipated Broadway 4D have been scratched, as those behind the project were unable to raise the $80 million necessary to complete major renovations to 42nd Street’s historic Times Square Theater where the film was to play

    Times Square Theatre and Entertainment Center – new center for Off
    and Off-Off Broadway productions will open its doors on New Year’s Day, 2002,
    after previews running throughout December – new complex will house rehearsal
    halls, screening rooms, an art gallery, gift shop, bar, restaurant as well as a
    late night club cabaret for events and private parties – located on 8th Ave.
    between 42nd and 43rd Streets – closed 1997

    Times Theatre – closed; demolished

    Tisch School of the Arts

    Tivoli Gardens Theatre – see Richmond Hill Theatre

    TKTS – ONE HALF PRICE THEATRE TICKETS
    – – opened June 25, 1973 – celebrating 31 years June 25, 2004 – With
    construction of its new home about to begin, the TKTS discount ticket booth will
    move out of Duffy Square April 30/06 and into the New York Marriott Marquis
    Hotel — one block south — May 1/06 – grand reopening of new TKTS on Duffy Square
    as of Oct 16/08 – new opening hours as of Oct 23/12 – It will now open at 10 a.m. Monday through Saturday, and 11 a.m. on Sunday, to sell full-price tickets only. Discount tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays; 11 a.m. on Sundays; 2 p.m. on Tuesdays; and 3 p.m. on Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays; The TKTS booth in Times Square, which sells discount tickets for Broadway and Off Broadway shows, will now offer a new incentive, the TKTS 7-Day Fast Pass, designed to allow patrons to skip the regular lines at the booth if they have made a TKTS purchase in the last seven days.

    Theatergoers who bring their TKTS stub to the booth within seven days of that ticket’s date can walk up to Window No. 1 for their next purchase of either same-day discounts or future-performance full-price tickets and avoid the other lines.

    It was also announced that the TKTS booth located at South Street Seaport is scheduled to reopen in July/13. It has been closed since October after sustaining damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.


    Toho Cinema – see Bijou Theatre

    Tondeklayo’s Melody Room – 52nd Street – 1930s nightclub

    Tony Awards – (Antoinette Perry Awards) – established by American Theatre
    Wing in 1947

    Tony Pastor’s Music Hall – Union Square 1889-1890; 2nd – Tony Pastor’s
    Opera House (NYC) – see Buckley’s Hall – 1865 – 585 Broadway and Prince Street –
    opened larger theatre in 1875 and in 1881 opened theatre on 14th Street – Parlor
    Match 1884 (16) – 2nd Tony Pastor’s New Fourteenth Street Theatre – moved his
    operation from Bowery to a theatre in Tammany Hall, near Union Square (see Tony
    Pastor’s Music Hall) – former Bryant’s Minstrel House in Tammany Society Bldg –
    143 E 14th Street – 1881 presented first vaudeville programme – turned to
    burlesque as Olympic Theatre – closed 1928 – now site of the Con Edison building

    Tony’s – small cabaret – Mabel Mercer

    Toots Shor’s – 27-39 West 52nd Street – originally on West 51st Street

    Top of the Gate – Charles Pierce 1954; Tuscaloosa’s Calling Me…But
    I’m Not Going 1975; Nightclub Cantata 1977 (145); Rap Master Ronnie 1984;
    Beehive 1986 – see Village Gate

    Touring Companies – after demise in Britain of local stock and repertory
    companies, touring groups appeared because of cheap rail travel, but today
    companies throughout the world travel mainly by road, but these companies are
    becoming rarer because of escalating costs

    TOSOS

    Tower (Carver), Bronx – 1914 -1,693 seats -Church

    *Town Hall – opened 1921 (2011 is their 90th Anniversary) – 123 West
    43rd St. between 6th & 7th – now a National historic site in the heart of the
    theatre district – serving the community since 1921 – Canadian Portia White
    debut 1944; Young Tom Edison 1997

    Town Theatre – closed; demolished

    Toybox Theatre

    Trafalgar – see Nederlander, and Billy Rose – Who’s Life Is It
    Anyway

    Trafalgar Hotel – Gramercy Park – 1890s nightspot

    Trans-Lux 85th Street Theatre – closed; demolished; 2nd – Trans-Lux 52nd
    Street Theatre – closed; 3rd – Trans-Lux Modern Theatre – closed and demolished;
    4th – Trans-Lux Southstreet Seaport Cinema – closed; 5th – Trans-Lux Theatre –
    58th and Madison – 1931 – 161 and 210 seat auditoriums; 6th – Trans-Lux 49th
    Street Theatre – closed; demolished; 7th – Trans-Lux 60th Street – closed;
    demolished
    Triad – comedy club

    *Triad Theatre
    – 158 West 72nd St. (Broadway & Columbus Circle)- 130 seats on 2nd
    floor of upper West Side Club -cabaret style space – see Steve McGraw’s Supper
    Club – Big City Rhythm 1995; Forbidden Broadway Strikes Back 1996; Secrets Every
    Smart Traveller Should Know 1997; American Rhapsody 2001 – to become Stage 72 in November, 2013 relaunch
    Triad

    Tribeca Performing Arts Center – 199 Chambers Street (between
    Greenwich and West Streets)

    *Tribeca
    Playhouse
    – 111 Reade St (just East of W. Broadway)

    Tribune Theatre – closed

    *Trilogy
    – 341 West 44th St.(between 8th & 9th Aves) (2 blackbox theatres on 2nd floor of
    office building (38 seats/70 seats) – resident companies include
    Feed the Herd – (formed 1997);
    Freestyle Repertory Theatre; Neo Pack; Odyssey Theatre Ensemble; Tupu Kweli;
    Mouth Productions ) – 70 seats and 30 seats)- closing May 15/04 due to dispute
    with landlord

    Triplet Hall – see Winter Garden – Broadway above Bleecker

    Truck and Warehouse Theatre – Steambath 1970 (127); House of Blue
    Leaves 1971 (337), Women Behind Bars – demolished

    Tripler Hall – see Winter Garden Theatre and New York Theatre –
    built for Jenny Lind’s debut 1850 but was not completed in time – known as
    Metropolitan Theatre – burned down 1854 – rebuilt – leased to Laura Keene’s
    Varieties; then Burton’s New Theatre, then became Winter Garden 1864 – all 3
    Booth brothers in Julius Caesar – burned to ground 1867 – became Grand Central
    (now Broadway Central0 Hotel – West side of Broadway opposite Bond St

    Trocadero Cabaret Theatre – One Foot Out of the Door 1993

    Trocadero Gloxinia Ballet Co – 1972 – Greenwich Village lofts and small
    theatres

    Truck and Warehouse Theatre – Steambath (Anthony Perkins,Hector
    Elizondo) 1970 (127); Billy Noname 1970; Faggot 1973

    *T. Schreiber Studio – 151 West 26th St. (7th)

    Tudor Theatre – closed; demolished

    Tuxedo, Bronx – 1927 -1,726 seats – Post office

    TV and Radio Studios – many theatres were used for a time as radio and TV
    studios – Ambassador, Avon, Belasco, Bijou, Center, Century, Colonial, Concert,
    Cort, Ed Sullivan, George Abbott, Helen Hayes, Hudson, International, Longacre,
    Majestic, Maxine Elliott’s, Royale, Studio 54, Vanderbilt, Virginia, Walter
    Kerr, Ziegfeld

    28th Street Theatre – 120 West 28th St. (home to MCC Theatre
    Company)

    *29th Street Rep
    – 212 West 29th Street, between 7th & 8th – Off-Off Broadway company
    where “brutal theatre lives,” has lost its Manhattan theatre space, August 2008

    22 Steps Theatre – see Latin Quarter – Dogg’s Hamlet/Cahoot’s
    Macbeth 1979 (direct from London’s Collegiate Theatre)

    Twilo – 530 West 27th St – former New York Club – now Sleep No More

    Two Boots Pioneer Theatre – open

    Two Guitars – Russian nightspot – 244 E 14th Street – late 1940s

    U

    Ubangi Club – became Birdland – 1678 Broadway – 1930s nightspot; 2nd –
    Ubangi Club – 133rd Street – gay club with chorus of female impersonators –
    Gladys Bentley

    Ubu Repertory Theater – 15 West 28th Street
    Underground – 955 West End Ave @ 107th St & Broadway – Let My People Come – starts Feb 7/13 Fridays at 8 and 10 for 8 weeks

    Underwood Theatre – not for profit theatre company – using various venues

    Union Hall – rock club – Park Slope

    *Union Square
    Theatre
    – 100 East 17th St.(between Union Square & Irving Place) (499)
    – opened 1871 with Belles of the Kitchen – was once Tammany Hall – opened as
    variety hall – burnt down 1888 – rebuilt under various names – became burlesque
    house, then cinema – was one of the largest off-Broadway houses – demolished
    1936 – rebuilt and was home of the Roundabout Theatre Company for 7 years –
    Eating Raoul 1992; Vita and Virginia (Eileen Atkins,Vanessa Redgrave) 1994 (29);
    London Suite (Carole Shelly,Kate Burton,Paxton Whitehead) 1995; Visiting Mr.
    Green (Eli Wallach-replaced by Hal Linden) 1998; Wit 1998 transferred from MCC
    Theatre (545); Laramie Project 2000 (126); Jitney 2000 – transferred here from
    Second Stage; Bat Boy 2001 (278)- play closed after effects of 9/11

    Union Theatre – see Chatham Theatre

    United Artsists East – open

    United Artists 64th and 2nd – open

    United Booking Office – founded turn of century

    United Palace Theatre – 4140 Broadway, between 175th and 176th St – opened 1930 as Loew’s 175th Street Theatre – 3400 seats

    United Scenic Artists of America – organized 1885 – New York local founded
    1912 – in 1918 became affiliated with Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and
    Paperhangers of America (now Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades)

    Upright Citizen’s Brigade
    - see Harmony Theater

    Upstairs at Jimmy’s – What’s a Nice Country Like You Doing in a
    State Like This 1973 (543)

    Upstairs at O’Neals – crowded cabaret space on top of that 43rd Street eatery – O’Neals’ Cabaret (1982) – 308 perf

    *Upstairs at Rose’s
    Turn
    - see Rose’s Turn

    Upstairs at Studio 54 – see Studio 54

    Upstairs at the Downstairs/Downstairs at the Upstairs – intimate
    uptown club of 1950s and 1960s with revues by Julius Monk – Weigh-In (Way Out) (1970); Freefall; (728 perf)(1969);Bette Midler (1967);Mixed Doubles (1966)(320 perf); Below the
    Belt (1966);Just For Openers (1965)(375 perf);The Game is Up (1964);…And in This Corner (1964); Graham Crackers (1963); Ben Bagley (1962);No Shoestrings (1962);Seven Come Eleven (1961);One Over the Eight
    (1961);Seven Comes Eleven (1961); Dressed to the Nines (1960);4 Below Strikes Back (1959); Pieces of Eight (1959); Demi-Dozen (1958)(728 perf);Take 5 (1957); Son of 4 Below (1956); 4 Below (1956);

    Uptown Theatre – closed; demolished

    *Urban Stages
    – 259 West 30th Street – housed in a storefront – between 7th and 8th

    Urban’s Ziegfeld – 1927

    Uris Theatre – see Capitol Theatre – 51st Street – 1900 seats –
    Circle in the Square housed in basement – opened 1972 with Via Galactica (7) –
    see George Gershwin Theatre – Seesaw 1973; Gigi (Agnes Moorehead,Alfred
    Drake,Daniel Massey) 1973; King and I 1977 (696); Porgy and Bess 1979; Sweeney
    Todd (Angela Lansbury,Len Cariou) 1979 (558); Pirates of Penzance 1981 (772);

    V

    Valencia Theatre – opened in 1929 at Jamaica Avenue and Merrick
    Boulevard in Jamaica, Queens – used as a church – was a Loews theatre designed
    by John Eberson, 3500 seats

    Valentine, Bronx – 1920 – 1,224 seats -Retail

    Van Dam Theatre – Sing Muse! 1961

    Vanderbilt – Park Avenue and 34th Street – 1930s nightclub

    Vanderbilt Theatre – 148 West 48th Street – 1918 – 780 seats –
    opened with Oh, Look 1918; Irene 1919 (670), Anna Christie (Pauline Lord) 1921
    (177); Girl Friend (Rodgers & Hart) 1926 (301); Peggy-Ann 1926 (333);
    Connecticut Yankee 1927 (418); Plutocrat 1930 (101); Mulatto 1935 (373); New
    Faces of 1936 (Van Johnson) – From 1939 NBC did network broadcasts as did ABC
    and it returned to stage shows in 1952 – Ruth Draper 1954 – demolished in 1954
    and became a parking garage

    *Variety Arts
    – 110 – 3rd Avenue below 14th St. (498) – built 1911 as a nickelodeon
    – refurbished and renovated in 1991 as legitimate theatre – 498 seats – Return
    to the Forbidden Planet 1991; Annie Warbucks 1993; Zombie Prom 1996;
    Always…Patsy Cline 1997; Savion Glover/Downtown 1998; Dinner With Friends
    celebrated 1 year (Nov. 19, 2000); Adult Entertainment (Elaine May)(Danny
    Aiello,Jeannie Berlin) 2002 – possibly the oldest existing theatre in Manhattan
    – closing October 2004 – space is being sold and will no longer be a theatre –
    to be demolished 2005 – closed

    Variety Theatre (Variety Photoplays) – built 1900

    Vasser College – Powerhouse Theatre, Mainstage and Susan Stein Shivz
    Theatre – Mr. Goldwyn (Alan King) 2001;

    Vaudeville Managers Protective Association – founded 1900

    Vauxhall Garden Theatre – opened 1806 on Fourth Avenue and Astor
    Place – replacing original which was on Greenwich Street – new Saloon Theatre
    opened 1838; 2nd Vauxhall – 1846 – Vauxhall Garden Theatre Upright Citizens
    Brigade Theatre – 161 West 22nd St. (7th Avenue) – demolished 1855

    Venice Theatre – see Jolson’s 59th St. Theatre and Century Theatre – Africana 1934; Cradle Will Rock 1937;

    Versailles Club – 151 East 50th St – 1930s nightclub

    Victoria Theatre – see Gaiety Theatre; 2nd – Victoria (NYC) – built
    1899 – 1200 seats – 42nd Street and 7th Avenue – 1,060 seats – see Gaiety –
    built on site of Gilley Moore’s Market Stables (Longacre Square) – opening show
    A Reign of Error (Rogers brothers) 1899; Miss Print (Marie Dressler); Sweet
    Music; Office Boy; Lew Dockstader’s Minstrel Show – Paradise Roof Garden –
    became Hammersteins – 1904 turned to vaudeville – W.C.Fields, the Keatons,
    Charlie Chaplin, Houdini, Bert Williams, Four Cohans, Seven Little Foys, Evelyn
    Nesbitt in her red velvet swing and Flossie Crane – demolished 1935; 3rd
    Victoria Theatre – 125th Street (near Apollo in Harlem) – 1917 burlesque theatre designed by Thomas W. Lamb – 2,400 seats
    – in danger of demolition, or hopefully revival – no shows in 10 years – housed
    last NY performance of Josephine Baker, fights of Cassius Clay – has been home to vaudeville shows, Off Broadway productions and Hollywood movies. But its terra cotta facade has been mostly dark since 1989 when, after failing as a five-screen multiplex, it shut its doors – two towers to rise above the theater: a 140-unit rental building and a separate 175-room hotel. The base will consist of the historic building – will become the new home of Classical Theater of Harlem, Jazzmobile, the Harlem Arts Alliance and the Apollo Theater Foundation – 199-seat theater and a 99-seat theater in which seats can be removed to create a multitude of configurations – four-story theater building will house scenery shop, costume shop, administrative offices, dressing rooms and a gallery

    Victoria Five Theatre – 310 West 125th St. (8th Avenue)

    Victory – see New Victory – 207 West 42nd St – see Republic – see
    Belasco – built 1899 (500 seats) originally 1,100 seats – located west of
    Hammerstein’as Victoria – built as legitimate house but showed films most of its
    life – Sag Harbor, Abie’s irish Rose – became New Victory Theatre 1995

    Vieux-Colombier Theatre – see Garrick Theatre

    Village Arena Theatre – Touch 1970

    Village Barn - 8th Street – in basement of newly built 8th Street
    Playhouse, an innovative movie theatre for the time, circa 1927 (information on
    Village Gate/Top of the Gate and Village Barn supplied by Scott C. Parker NYC –
    the space where the Village Barn was is now the Electric Lady Recording Studios.
    Founded by Jimi Hendrix – movie theater upstairs is now a video store

    Village East Cinemas – open

    Village Gate/Top of the Gate – see also Top of the Gate and Village
    Theatre – 158 Bleeker and Thompson Streets – Nina Simone 1961; Bob Dylan 1963;
    Byrds 1966; MacBird (Stacy Keach,Rue McClanahan) 1967 (386); Jacques Brel is
    Alive and Well and Living in Paris (Elly Stone) 1968 (1847), National Lampoon’s
    Lemmings (Chevy Chase,John Belushi)+ 1973; Let My People Come 1974 (1327)(moved
    after 2 years at Village Gate to Morosco Theatre); Tuscaloosa’s Calling Me But
    I’m Not Going 1975 (Top); Lovesong 1976; Tony Williams 1976; Scrambled Feet 1979
    (831), One Mo’ Time 1979 (1372); Lies and Legends: Musical Stories of Harry
    Chapin 1985; Mayor 1985; Beehive 1986 (600); Rap Master Ronnie 1984; Lies and
    Legends: Musical Stories of Harry Chapin 1985; Mayor 1985; Beehive 1986 (600);
    Mama’s Boys, 2 by 5; Prom Queens Unchained 1991; Nell Carter – now a drug store

    Village Gate – a new endeavour opened a few doors from the original
    and being used as a night club

    Village Light Opera Group

    Village South Theatre – Vandam Street (Greenwich Village) – opened 1962 with Coach With the Six Insides 1962 (114 perf) – was an Off-Broadway theatre in New York City that was active during the 1960s – 1963 Edward Albee used profits from Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? to establish the Playwrights’ Unit at this theatre; an organization which provided a platform for untested new playwrights to premiere their works – theatre closed in 1970, with its last production being Who’s Happy Now?

    Village Theatre – 158 Bleecker Street – originally The Village Gate – now
    completely remodelled – Love,Janis 2002 (713)

    Village Vanguard – 178 8th Avenue South, Greenwich Village – jazz
    cabaret – Judy Holliday, Eartha Kitt, Lenny Bruce, Nina Simone, Woody Guthrie,
    Peter Paul and Mary, Harry Belafonte, Betty Comden and Adolph Green – 1940s

    *Vineyard
    Theater/Dimson
    – 108 East 15th St. at Union Square East(120)- housed in
    a modern apartment/office tower – Clues to a Life 1982; Goblin Market 1985;
    Hannah….39 1990; Bed and Sofa 1996; How I Learned to Drive (Mary-Louise
    Parker,David Morse) – transferred to Century – Pulitizer Prize 1997; Dying Gaul
    1998; Avenue Q 2003 – transferred to Broadway

    Vinnies – 147 Waverly Place

    *Virginia
    – being renamed August Wilson Theatre as of oct 17/05 – (see also
    Guild, ANTA, August Wilson) – 245 West 52nd St. (Jujamcyn-1,264 seats) – Home of
    the Theatre Guild – built in 1925 as the Guild Theatre – Caesar and Cleopatra
    1925; 1943 became radio studios – then was extensively renovated in 1950 and
    became the Anta – Tower Beyond Tragedy 1950 – in 1981 became The Virginia after
    daughter of the founder – On Your Toes 1983 (505), Carrie (Betty Buckley) 1988;
    City of Angels (James Naughton) 1989 (878), Jelly’s Last Jam (Gregory
    Hines,Savion Glover) 1992(569), Smokey Joe’s Café 1995; A Man For All Seasons,
    Wild Party (Mandy Patinkin,Toni Collette,Eartha Kitt) 2000, Best Man (Charles
    Durning,Spalding Gray,Chris Noth,Elizabeth Ashley,Christine Ebersole) 2000
    (121); King Hedley II (Brian Stokes Mitchell,Leslie Uggams) 2001; Little Shop of
    Horrors (Hunter Foster,Kerry Butler,Rob Bartlett) 2003

    Vitagraph Theatre – see Olympia

    *Vital (Theatre on
    Three)
    – 432 West 42nd Street – 3rdfloor (39 seats)- new home at the
    McGinn Cazale Theatre above Promenade as of November 2004

    *Vivian Beaumont
    Theatre
    – 150 West 65th St. at Broadway (see Lincoln Centre) (1,080
    seats) – built 1965 in Lincoln Centre for the Performing Arts – opened with
    Danton’s Death 1965 – houses two theatres, the Vivian Beaumont and the Mitzi E.
    Newhouse (299 seats)-originally called the Forum (opened 1966) until 1973 – in
    1996 both theatres underwent 8 million dollar renovation – several dark seasons
    – reopened in 1986 – Boom Boom Room (Madeleine Kahn,Charles Durning,Robert
    Loggia) 1973 (37); Black Picture Show 1975 (41); Steamers 1976, Threepenny Opera
    (Raul Julia) 1976 (307), Cherry Orchard 1977,Floating Light Bulb 1981); Anything
    Goes (Patti LuPone) 1987 (804), Six Degrees of Separation (Stockard Channing)
    1990 (485), Au Pair Man, My Favorite Year 1992; Carousel (Audra McDonald) 1994;
    Parade (Brent Carver) 1998 (85); Marie Christine (Audra McDonald) 1999 (44);
    Contact (Karen Ziemba) 2000 transferred from Newhouse; Matters of the Heart 2000
    (Patti LuPone);QED (Alan Alda) 2001; Light in the Piazza – 2005; South Pacific 2009; War Horse 2011;

    W

    Wakefield, Bronx – 1927 – 1330 seats – church

    Waldorf Astoria – (Starlight Roof, Empire Room) – 301 Park Avenue –
    built 1929 – Guy Lombardo New Year’s Eves – famous nightclub

    Waldorf Theatre – 116 West 50th St at 6th Ave – 1926 – 1048 seats –
    opened with Sure Thing 1926 (37); Take the Air (204), revival of That’s
    Gratitude 1932 (204); Whistling in the Dark (122) – 1933 became a movie house –
    1941 became retail space and was demolished in the late 1960s for Rockefeller
    Center’s Exxon Building

    Walker Street Theatre – 46 Walker St. (Church & Broadway)

    Walker Theatre – 6401 18th Avenue, Brooklyn – 1927 – 2276 seats – closed –
    now retail stores

    Wallack’s Lyceum Theatre – see Star Theatre – 485 Broadway & Broome
    – opened as Brougham’s Lyceum 1850 and opened 1852 with present name – 1861
    became Broadway Music Hall, then Olympic and later Broadway Theatre – demolished
    1869; 2nd – Wallack’s Theatre (NYC) – Broadway and 30th Street – SW corner –
    1882 – (name also used by Lew M. Fields Theatre (1924-1940) – School for Scandal
    1882 – became Palmer 1888 – reverted to Wallack’s 1896 – Sapho 1900 (29 –
    reopened for 55 more performances) – closed 1915 – see also Lyceum Broadway –
    demolished; 2nd Wallack’s Theatre – was at 254 West 42nd Street – 1924 –
    originally opened as Lew Fields – Crisis 1902; It Happened in Nordland 1904 –
    1906 became Hackett – 1911 Harris and Frazee respectively – became cinema 1931 –
    1997 demolished ; 3rd Wallack’s Theatre – Star Theatre was known as Wallack’s
    from 1861 to 1882 – demolished 1901; 4th Wallack’s Theatre – Broadway & 13th Sts
    (922 seats) – built on Astor family property – Poor of New York 1857 (42); New
    Wallack’s Theatre opened in 1861 – Rosedale or Rifle Ball 1863 (125), Shaughraun
    1874 (143); name changed to Star Theatre in 1881; New Park Theatre opened in
    1882 – Fortune Teller 1898 (40), Fritz, Disraeli (George Arliss) 1911 (280); Our
    Cousin German 1928 (63), Squaw Man 1905 (222), Sultan of Sulu 1902 (192), Time
    The Place and the Girl 1907 (32), County Chairman 1903 (222), Alias Jimmy
    Valentine 1910 (155) – see also Palmer’s Theatre, Germania, Star – demolished

    *Walter Kerr
    – 219 West 48th St. (Jujamcyn-956 seats) Opened in 1921 as the Ritz –
    Drinkwater’s Mary Stuart 1921; 1920s Bluebeard’s Eighth Wife (Ina Claire);
    Madame Pierre; Love with Love (Lynn Fontanne); Outward Bound (Alfred Lunt,
    Leslie Howard); Old English (George Arliss); A Kiss in a Taxi (Claudette
    Colbert); Young Blood (Helen Hayes); A Weak Woman (Frank Morgan,Estelle Winwood);
    Excess Baggage (Miriam Hopkins); Courage; Broken Dishes (Donald Meek,Bette
    Davis) 1929; In the 1930s Ruth Draper; Double Door; The Wind and the Rain
    (Mildred Natwick); Petticoat Fever; Correspondent Unknown; As You Like It; Time
    and the Conways (Jessica Tandy,Dame Sybil Thorndike); Outward Bound 1939; leased
    to CBS as studio – ret’d to legit with New Faces of 1943 (Alice Pearce); Tobacco
    Road (moved from Forrest); reconditioned in 1972 and for a time was Robert F.
    Kennedy Children’s Theatre – vacant 1965-69 – then became porno theatre –
    renovated 1971 – Soon (Richard Gere); Dance of Death (Rip Torn,Viveca Linfors);
    Children Children (Gwen Verdon) 1972; restored and renamed in 1990 for the
    renowned drama critic Walter Kerr – Piano Lesson 1990 (320); Angels in America:
    Millennium Aproaches (Ron Leibman) 1993; Angels in America, Part II: Perestroika
    1993 (216); Patti LuPone on Broadway 1995 (46); Love,Valor,Compassion 1995;
    Forever Tango 1997; Beauty Queen of Leenane 1998 (374); Weir 1999 (276); Moon
    for the Misbegotten(Cherry Jones,Gabriel Byrne,Ray Dotrice)2000; Waiting in the
    Wings; Seven Guitars; Flying Karamazov Brothers; Dancing in the End Zone; Penn
    and Teller; I Hate Hamlet; Two Trains Running; Present Laughter; Proof (Mary
    Louise Parker) 2000 (917); Take Me Out (Denis O’Hare) 2003 (356); Grey Gardens
    (after Playwrights Horizon) 2006; A Catered Affair 2008; House of Blue Leaves (revival) 2011;

    Walter Reed Theatre
    – West 65th Street, plaza level, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues – 268 seats

    Ward, Bronx – 1,831 seats – Retail; Vacant

    Warner Hollywood – 51st Street and Broadway – 1,600 seats opened as
    a cinema in 1930 but became the Mark Hellinger Theatre (see); 2nd – Warner’s
    Beacon – see Beacon; 3rd – Warner’s Beacon – see Beacon

    Washington Hall – see Charley White’s Opera House – Broadway below Houston
    St

    Washington Square Church – Tony and Tina’s Wedding 1988 (over 2000
    performances)

    Washington Square Players – 1914 – used various venues – 1916 moved
    to Comedy Theatre – disbanded 1918

    Washington Square Theatre – 40 West 4th Street – 1964 – After the
    Fall 1964; Incident at Vichy (Hal Holbrook,David Wayne) 1964; Man of La Mancha
    1965 – demolished 1968

    Washington Theatre – closed

    *Waterloo Bridge Theatre – 203 West 38th St. (7th)

    Waverley Theatre – 720 Broadway (opposite New York Hotel); 2nd –
    Waverley Theatre – 7th Avenue above Bank St – Rocky Horror Show most weekends
    in its hayday – now closed – reopening June 2005

    Way Off Broadway Theatre School – 95 Christopher Street

    Weber and Fields Music Hall – 29th Street – opened 1895 – next to
    Daly’s Theatre – main entrance diverted to Broadway when Weber and Fields leased –
    Weber and Fields’ Broadway Music Hall – later became Weber’s Theatre – closed 1904
    – 1912 showed motion pictures – razed 1917; office bldg erected; 2nd – Weber
    and Fields’ Music Hall (NYC) – 216 West 44th St – 1902 – formerly the Imperial
    Theatre – 1463 seats – opened 1912 with double bill of Roly-Poly and Without the
    Law with Weber and Fields 1912 – Geisha 1913 when name changed to 44th Street
    Theatre when comedy team broke up – Katrinka 1915 (7 mos); Big Boy (Al Jolson);
    Song of the Flame; A Night in Spain; Five O’Clock Girl; Animal Crackers 1928
    (Marx brothers) (6 mos); Johnny Johnson 1936 (68), Four Saints in Three Acts
    1934; Rosalinda 1942 (521); My Golden Girl; Our Nell (Gershwin); Certin; The
    Wonder Bar (Al Jolson); – roof theatre Lew Fields’ 44th Street Roof Garden – the
    house changed names 9 times in 24 years i.e. Nora Bayes Theatre – basement
    housed a café known as the Little Club, and later became the legendary Stage
    Door Canteen – Lillian Russell, Fay Templeton, David Warfield, DeWolf Hopper,
    Weber & Fields – see also Nora Bayes Theatre, 44th Street Theatre – house
    changed names 9 times in 24 years – theatre was razed in 1945 and the Times
    building constructed on site; Weber’s Theatre – see Weber and Fields Music Hall
    – closed; demolished

    Webster Hall - rock club East Village – 1,400 capacity

    Weill Recital Hall – Widow’s Waltz 1992

    Westbank-Laurie
    Beechman

    *Westbeth
    Theatre Centre
    – 151 Bank Street – 2 theatres – Song Floating 1994

    West End Theatre – closed

    Westminster Cinema – see Punch & Judy Theatre, Charles Hopkins
    Theatre

    Westminster Theatre – see Punch and Judy’s

    * Westside Arts – 234 West 44th St – (upstairs 299 seats;
    downstairs 250 seats)- built 1889 as German Baptist church – became a theatre in
    1970s – renovated in 1991 with two theatres – Ashayna Maidel (501), Extremeties,
    Mystery of Irma Vep, Sea Horse, Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You,
    Pump Boys and Dinettes 1981, I Can’t Keep Running in Place 1981; Pump Boys and
    Dinettes 1981; Charlotte Sweet 1982; Tallulah 1983, Penn and Teller 1985 (666),
    Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune 1987 (533); A Shayna Maidel 1987 (501);
    And the World Goes Round 1991; Vagina Monologues 1999; Love, Loss and What I Wore 2010;

    *Westside Theatre
    – 407 West 43rd St (between 9th and 10th Aves)- Sea Horse (Conchata
    Ferrell) 1974 (4 months); Piano Bar 1978; And The World Goes Round 1991;
    Balancing Act 1992; Spic-O Rama (John Leguizamo)1992 (80); Cryptogram (Ed
    Begley) 1995; I Love You You’re Perfect Now Change 1996 (12 years as of Aug
    1/08);

    Weylin – 40 East 54th @Madison – 1930s nightclub

    Wharf Theatre – see Cruger’s Wharf Theatre

    Where Eagles Dare Theatre – 347
    West 36th St – both theatres hold 40-50

    William Brady’s Playhouse – see Playhouse Theatre

    William Street Theatre – 1790

    Willis (Casino), Bronx – 1923 – 2,166 seats – Retail

    Windsor, Bronx – 1920 -1,600 seats – Nightclub

    Windsor Theatre - see 48th Street Theatre – Maud of Arran; Cradle
    Will Rock 1938 (108) – demolished

    *Wings Theatre
    Company
    - 154 Christopher Street (74)(between Greenwich and Washington
    St)- in basement of an arts center

    Winter Garden – see Triplet Hall – opposite Bond Street – 624 Broadway – opened 1859 located in the
    remodeled Triplet Hall – Julius Caesar (Junius Brutus Booth and John Wilkes Booth) 1864; Hamlet (Edwin
    Booth) 1864 (140 perf); Octoroon 1859 (48) – burned down 1867; 2nd Winter Garden – 1514-16 Broadway – opened 1895 as Olympia – renamed several times – demolished
    1935; 3rd Winter Garden –

    Winter Garden Theatre
    – 1634 Broadway @ 51st St. (Shubert-1,526 seats)
    – a former cattle barn (Second American Horse Exchange 1896, converted building into theatre which
    opened on March 20, 1911, with La Belle Paree, starring
    Al Jolson – Jolson would star in many Winter Garden shows – (1600 seats)East
    side of Broadway – East Lynne 1863 (20) – 1911 became a cinema for year, then
    theatre home to many “Passing Shows” annually from 1912 to 1924;Queen of the
    Movies (Valli Valli) 1914 (13 weeks); Robinson Crusoe Jr (Al Jolson)1916 (139);
    Kissing Time 1919 (430); Artists and Models 1925; Tell Me More 1925; Great
    Temptations (Jack Benny,Billy Van) 1926 (6 months); cinema again in mid 20s to
    1933 – Ziegfeld Follies of 1934; At Home Abroad 1935; Ziegfeld Follies of 1936;
    You Never Know 1938; Sons o’ Fun 1941 (742), Ziegfeld Follies of 1943 (Milton
    Berle) (553), Mexican Hayride 1944; showed films in 1940s – Mike Todd’s Peep
    Show 1950; I Make a Wish 1951; Top Banana (Phil Silvers) 1951; Wonderful Town
    1953 (559), Peter Pan (Mary Martin) 1954 (149); Shangri-La 1956; West Side Story
    (Larry Kert,Carol Lawrence) 1957 (732), Juno 1959; Saratoga 1959; Unsinkable
    Molly Brown (Tammy Grimes) 1960 (532), All American (Ray Bolger,Anita Gillette)
    1962 (86); Sophie 1963; Funny Girl (Barbra Streisand)1964 (1348), Mame (Angela
    Lansbury) 1966 (1508), Jimmy 1969; Purlie; Peter Pan; Follies (Alexis Smith,Gene
    Nelson,Dorothy Collins,John McMartin,Yvonne DeCarlo) 1971 (522), Gypsy –
    revival-Angela Lansbury 1974 (120); Pacific Overtures 1976 (193); Fiddler on the
    Roof (revival Zero Mostel) 1976; Beatlemania 1977 (920), Forty Second Street
    1980; Cats (Betty Buckley,Hector Jaime Mercado,Ken Page) (opened 10/82 – 7485) ,
    42nd Street (8/80 to 1/89 – 3,485 performances); renovated 2001 – Mamma Mia 2001
    – 2002 became Cadillac Winter Garden; 4th – Metropolitan Theatre in 1858 renamed
    Winter Garden until burnt down in 1867; 5th –
    Winter Garden- see Tripler
    Hall – Battery Park City on the Hudson River – home to Arts and Events program
    and free programmes – Mary Cleere Haran, Liz Callaway 2003

    Winthrop Ames Theatre – 45th Street between Broadway and 8th – see
    Little Theatre – changed to Winthrop Ames in 1964

    WNET – Lincoln Center and WNET.org jointly announced the new street-level,
    glass-walled production facility and television studio that will open at the
    corner of Broadway – new production facility on the Lincoln Center campus in the
    spring of 2009 at 66th Street in the newly expanded building housing Alice Tully
    Hall and The Juilliard School

    Women’s Project Theatre
    and Productions
    – 424 West 55th Street

    Wonderland Theatre

    Wood’s Minstrel Hall – 514 Broadway – see Wood’s Theatre Hall, Theatre
    Comique – Broadway below Spring St; 2nd – Wood’s Theatre/Hall (NYC) – 514
    Broadway – between Spring and Broome Streets – 1865 – see Daly’s Theatre,
    Theatre Comique – 1869 renovated for 30,000 and opened with Ixion, ex-king of
    Thessaly or The Man at the Wheel – minstrel, burlesque – 1884 demolished by fire

    Wood’s Museum – Davy Crockett, or Be Sure You’re Right, Then Go
    Ahead 1873 (12), Across the Continent 1871 (42)

    Workshop Theater’s Jewel Box – 312 W. 36th St, 4th Floor

    Works Production


    World’s Fair Fountain Lake Amphitheatre – built 1939

    World’s Fair Music
    Hall
    – built 1939 – 2500 seats

    World Financial Center’s Winter Garden Theater – 220 Vesey St

    World Theatre – see Punch & Judy Theatre

    World Trade Center – see also Ground
    Zero – The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC) announced Oct. 12/04
    the selection of eminent architect Frank Gehry and Partners as architect for the
    performing arts complex on the World Trade Center site – The firms will
    immediately begin the schematic design process with the cultural institutions
    and the LMDC on the two buildings that will include dance, theatre, museum, and
    fine arts facilities. The resident performing arts group in the facility, as
    previously announced, will be The Joyce Theater (devoted to dance) and the
    Off-Broadway Signature Theatre Company – downtown homes for the troupes will
    be called the Joyce Theater International Dance Center and the Signature Theatre
    Center – Center’s current design, created by collaborators including Gehry Partners, includes a 1,000-seat theater and a secondary performance space, as well as rehearsal rooms, admin space, a plaza and a cafe

    Worldwide Plaza Theatres (see also Dodger Stages) – 50th and 51st
    Street between 8th and 9th Avenues – scheduled for 2003 – plans to create five
    Off-Broadway theatres in the underground space that once held the Worldwide
    Plaza cinemas – former Loews Cineplex Odeon Theater space is located underground
    at Worldwide Plaza, an office-retail complex with a popular outdoor promenade.
    Dodger is planning two 499-seat theatres, two 400 seat theatres and a fifth with
    299-seats. – Dodger Stage Holding has announced details of its theater complex
    at 340 W. 50th St. – the space at Worldwide Plaza will be shaped into five Off
    Broadway venues to be completed by fall 2004

    Worrell Sisters’ New York Theatre – 1865- demolished 1884 – see also New York Theatre – Department store owner A. T. Stewart fashioned a theatre from the Unitarian Chuch of the Messiah, for his protege, Lucy Rushton, and named it for her later that year. After she departed, it underwent many name and management changes. In 1881, Harrigan & Hart moved their Theatre Comique to this location, extensively refurbishing the interior. Sadly, it burned down three years later, in 1884.

    *Worth Street
    Theatre
    – 33 Worth St. (West Broadway)- Small Craft Warnings 1999

    WOW Café – 59 E. 4th St. (Women’s One World Café) – only women’s
    alternative theatre

    WPA Federal Theatre – see Federal Theatre

    *WPA
    Theater
    – 519 West 23rd St. (128); Steel Magnolias 1987 – opened and
    transferred to Lucille Lortel for 817 performances; Weird Romance 1992; New York
    Rock 1994; Songs for a New World 1995

    WPP – see Theatre 4

    X

    Xenon – see Henry Miller’s Theatre

    Y

    Yacht Club – 150 West 52nd Street – 1920s nightclub

    Yeah Man – 138th Street & 7th Avenue – 1920s nightclub

    Ye Olde Tripple Inn – 263 West 54th Street (NYC) has been reinstated –
    this was one of NY’s longest running showcases and remains one of the only
    variety formats, singers/comics – venue has served as training space for Rita
    Rudder, Angel Salarzar, Nathan lane, Freddy Prinze, Jeff McBride, Vanessa
    Vickers and many others

    Yiddish Art Players – see Jolson’s 59th St. Theatre

    Yiddish Art Theatre – founded 1918 at Irving Place Theatre – moved
    to new theatre built for it on 2nd Avenue – survived until 1950see Phoenix
    Theatre; 2nd – Yiddish Arts Theatre – see George Abbott Theatre

    Yiddish Theatre – thrived in New York City from the 1880s until shortly
    after World War II mostly on Second Avenue from Houston Street to 14th Street, a
    strip which once featured dozens of theatres, the powerful Hebrew Actors Union,
    the Cafe Royal, a mecca of Yiddish theatre royalty

    York Playhouse – Garden District 1958; American Dream 1961 (370);
    Young Abe Lincoln 1961; Colette Collage 1983

    Yorke (Park), Bronx – 1923 – 1,260 seats -Retail

    *York Theatre (Theatre at St.
    Peter’s)(York Theatre Company)
    – 619 Lexington Ave (147 seats) – Garden
    District 1958; Jello is Always Red 1998; Taking a Chance on Love 2000; Roadside
    (Tom Jones/Harvey Schmidt) 2001 – performance space in St. Peter’s Church,
    Lexington at 54th Street (Living Room)

    Yumins – Broadway and 52nd Street – 1930s nightclub

    YWCA of Brooklyn – 30 Third Avenue (at Atlantic Avenue)

    Z

    Zanzibar Café – 49th & Broadway – 1940s – Cab Calloway, Berry Brothers

    Zenon – late 1970s dance club – competitor to Studio 54

    Ziegfeld Theatre – Northwest corner of 6th Avenue and 54th Steet –
    1927 – opened with Rio Rita 1927 (494); Show Boat (Helen Morgan,Charles
    Winninger) 1927 (575); Smiles; Bittersweet 1929; Show Girl; Ziegfeld Follies
    (final instalment – Helen Morgan) 1931 (164); Hot Cha; – 1932 became a cinema
    after Ziegfeld’s death until bought by Billy Rose and reopened – restored and
    reopened in 1944 – Seven Lively Arts; Red Mill 1945 (531), Brigadoon 1947 (581),
    Magdalena 1948; Rape of Lucretia (Kitty Carlisle,Giorgio Tozzi) 1949; Gentlemen
    Prefer Blondes 1949 (740); Brigadoon; Kismet 1953 (583), Porgy and Bess –
    revival 1952 – Foxy; 1955 to 1963 leased to NBC for 7 years – Perry Como Show –
    returned to theatre in 1963- Foxy (Bert Lahr) 1964; Anya 1965 – demolished in
    1966 and now houses the Burlington building and behind it Loew’s built a new
    theatre, aptly named 2nd – The Ziegfeld, just west of the original site 1969 to
    present – 141 W 54th St

    *Zipper Theatre – 336 West
    37th Street – formerly Belt Theatre – 240 seats – closed Jan 2009 both theatre
    and tavernTony winner Alan Cumming has joined forces with Nick Philippou and
    Audrey Rosenberg to form a new theatre company, The Art Party – Jean Genet’s
    Elle;Margaret Cho’s The Sensuous Woman; Here Lies Jenny, starring Bebe Neuwirth;
    Elle, starring Alan Cumming; Lypsinka in The Passion of the Crawford; BETTY in
    BETTY Rules; Addicted, and Henry Rollins’ Caught in the Zipper. Comedians who
    have appeared on The Zipper stage include Sarah Silverman in Jesus is Magic, Joy
    Behar, Rosie O’Donnell, Barry Humphries, Judy Gold, Lewis Black, Mario Cantone
    and Murray Hill. Past music acts include Megan Mullally and Supreme Music
    Program, Nellie McKay, Martha Plimpton and Lucy Wainwright Roche, Our Lady J,
    Justin Bond, The Last Town Chorus, Jay Brannan, Antony and the Johnsons, Scott
    Matthew, Marshall Crenshaw, Old Spring Pike, GrooveLily, Ute Lemper, Audra
    McDonald, Idina Menzel, Sherie Rene Scott, Daphne Rubin-Vega, Euan Morton and
    Michael Cerveris, as well as the Scissor Sisters, who filmed their controversial
    Filthy/Gorgeous music video at The Zipper (directed by John Cameron Mitchell)

    Please help me with this listing as I live in Toronto, Canada and do not have access to places like the New York Public Library or The Lincoln Centre Library for the Performing Arts to help me along.

    If you see errors, additions, duplications or anything pertinent to this listing, please drop me a line:

    This site contains links to other
    Internet sites. These links are not endorsements of any products or services in
    such sites, and no information in such site has been endorsed or approved by
    this site. We have no liability for goods,services or information that may be
    offered on this site, or that of any linked sites.”




  • 5 Responses to “Broadway and Off Broadway Theatres – M to Z”

    1. Hey We’re so glad We noticed your blog page Broadway and Off Broadway Theatres – M to Z | world-theatres.com I truly found u simply by mistake, while We was researching upon Askjeeve to get something else, Anyhow We’re here now plus I would certainly love to say thanks a lot on a incredible write-up plus a all round interesting website Company Website Design

    2. Sully27 says:

      What a great, comprehensive listing! Enjoyed flicking through the famous shows that have been at each venue too.

    3. Alton Hynek says:

      Great website – I really like it!

    4. Wynell Palka says:

      I enjoyed reading the site and post, very much great info. As opposed to other blogs in which I have come across during my research, this one is full with a a variety of great information that I will be writing about by myself for my report. Thank You!As former governor of CA use to say “I’ll Be Back”

    5. p809 says:

      I am truly happy to glance at this web site posts which
      carries plenty of helpful information, thanks
      for providing such information.

    Leave a Reply