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Broadway and Off Broadway Theatres – A to L










Your help with the listings would very much be appreciated, as I live in Toronto, Canada and do not have access to places like the New York Public Library or The Lincoln Centre Library for the Performing Arts.

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Updated July 18, 2014

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BROADWAY, OFF BROADWAY AND OFF-OFF BROADWAY THEATRES – A to L
(An Alphabetical Listing)

My only hope is that you enjoy this site, and if you have further information, or see inaccuracies, I would be most appreciative of new information. This site has been a labour of great love, albeit very labour-intensive. Broadway musicals, in particular, were formulated in the period 1866 to 1927; the Golden Age was considered from 1927 to 1966; the Fall or Decline of musicals, 1967 to present. In this period the casts became smaller, the orchestra smaller, and the sets and costumes more minimal. Gone was the heyday of large casts, full orchestra and elaborate sets. I am so glad that I got to see many of these productions in person, not just hearsay!

If you see errors, additions, duplications or anything pertinent to these listings, please drop me a line:

Check out this great new Broadway site:

Spotlight on Broadway

Quick Listing of New York Theatre and Concert Hall Addresses

QUICK GUIDE – A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L;

New York ranked highest for number of theatres, with 420, compared to 353 in Paris, 230 in Tokyo and 214 in London. London’s theatre admissions total is the second highest at 14.2 million – but New York is reported at drawing 28.1 million attendances.
On the museums front, London leads the way with 173, against 158 in Berlin, 137 in Paris and 131 in New York; while Paris has the most art galleries (1,046), with 857 in London, 721 in New York and 688 in Tokyo.
London also leads for comedy performances, with 11,388 against 11,076 in New York and 10,348 in Paris.
Paris leads for live music venues, with 423, against 385 in Tokyo, 349 in London, 294 in Sao Paulo and 277 in New York.

Manhattan has 20 film theaters, Queens 13 and Brooklyn 11. Even Staten Island, which has about one-third the population of the Bronx, has three multiplexes with 33 screens.

A

Aaron Davis Hall – Convent Ave and West 135th Street

Abbey’s New Park Theatre – 932 Broadway between 21st and 22nd
Sts – 1874 – burned to ground 1882 – never rebuilt – see Park Theatre

Abbey’s Theater -1893 – 1500 seats – next door to Casino Theater
at 1394 Broadway and 39th St. – opened with Sir Henry Irving’s Repertory
Company- 1896 it was renamed Knickerbocker – Red Mill 1906 (40 weeks); L’Aiglon
(Maude Adams); Quality Street (Maude Adams); Shrlock Holmes (William Gillette);
Mr. Bluebeard (Eddie Foy); Rome and Juliet 1904 (E.H. Southern and Julia
Marlowe); Yankee Prince 1908 (George M. Cohan); Chantecler 1911 (Maude Adams);
New Henrietta 1913 (Douglas Fairbanks); Disraeli (George Arliss_; Listen Lester
1918 (Clifton Webb) (34 weeks); Dearest Enemy 1925 (286 perf); Honeymoon Lane
1926 (Kate Smith) (317) – demolished 1930

Aberle’s Theatre – Broadway below Randall Place – abandoned St. Anne’s
Catholic Church – 8th St. between Broadway & Fourth – 1879 – leased to various
companies – known for a time as Germania Theatre – closed 1902 – demolished 1903

*Abington
- 432 West 42nd Street – 4th Floor

Abingdon Theatre Arts
- 312 West 36th Street – 1st floor – two theatres – new June Havoc Theatre
opening Fall 2003, and other Stage II – 98 and 56 seats – home to Abington
Theatre Company and Titans Theatre Company

Aborn Opera Company – U.S. touring company – 1902 – Brooklyn and
Baltimore – toured for 20 years

*Abrons Art Center
- 466 Grand St. @ Pitt Street – see Henry Street Settlement

Academy Hall – see Old Stuyvesant Hall

Academy Motion Picture Theatre – closed & demolished

Academy of Music – 1926 – 3,517 seats – Razed, 1998

Academy of Music – 14th Street between 3rd Avenue and Irving
Place – (1279 seats) – 1854 – 14th St & Broadway – originally Peter Stuyvesant’s
farm – succeeded Astor Place Opera House – over 30 years city’s leading opera
house – opera performances ceased early 1900s after establishment of the Met -
predates Brooklyn Academy of Music – In Old Kentucky 1893 (160) – burned to the
ground in 1866 – restored – In 1870, the literary Lotos Club was founded here.
After fashion moved uptown to the Metropolitan Opera House, the Academy
presented vaudeville and later silent movies. It had another incarnation across
the street that later became the Palladium – building demolished 1925

Academy Theatre at Lighthouse International – 111 E 59th Street at Lexington – major renovations – reopening Nov 15/10 with film “Funny Girl” -

Access Theatre – 380 Broadway (at White Street) – see Upright
Citizens Brigade

Acme Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre

Acting Company – founed 1972 by John Houseman – offshoot of Julliard –
originally known as City Centre Acting Company – Robber Bridegroom (1975)

Actors Collective – Perfect Crime 1987 (still running at another
theatre) – demolished

Actor’s Equity Association – commonly referred to as Actors’ Equity or simply Equity, is an American labor union representing the world of live theatrical performance, as opposed to film and television performance. However, performers appearing on live stage productions without a book or through-storyline (vaudeville, cabarets, circuses) may be represented by the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA). As of 2010, Equity represented over 49,000 theatre artists and stage managers – following dissolution of the Actor’s Society of America at a meeting held at Pabst Grand Circle Hotel, New York City, May 26, 1913, Actors’ Equity was founded by 112 professional theater actors, who established the association’s constitution and elected Francis Wilson as president – Leading up to the establishment of the association, a handful of influential actors—known as The Players—held secret organizational meetings at Edwin Booth’s old mansion on Gramercy Square – Players included Frank Gillmore, who from 1918 to 1929 was the Executive Secretary of Actors’ Equity and its eventual President, a position he held from 1929 to 1937 – Marie Dressler, Ethel Barrymore & others during the 1919 strike
Actors’ Equity joined the American Federation of Labor in 1919, and called a strike seeking recognition of the association as a labor union – strike ended the dominance of the Theatrical Syndicate, including theater owners and producers – strike increased membership from under 3,000 to approximately 14,000 – Chorus Equity Association, which merged with Actors’ Equity in 1955, was founded during the strike – Equity represented directors and choreographers until 1959, when they broke away and formed their own union – Actors’ Equity Association (“AEA” or “Equity”), the labor union representing more than 49,000 professional stage actors and stage managers in the US, will commemorate its 100th anniversary on Sunday, May 26/13. Founded in 1913 by 112 actors, AEA is the oldest performing arts union and has stood for excellence and diversity in the American theater, and for fairness, dignity and respect for its members.

Actors’ Institute(NYC)

Actors Outlet – Olympus on My Mind 1986

*Actors Playhouse(NYC)
- 100 7th Avenue S. – reopens Feb 20/09 – between Bleecker St. & 4th St -
off Broadway theatre for more than 40 years – 170 seats – to close as
performance space 2007 – Saturday’s Children 1927 (310); I Am A Camera (1956),
He Who Gets Slapped (1956), Wedding (1958), 1962; Pocket Watch 1966 (725);
Fortune and Men’s Eyes 1967 (382) and 1987; Boy Meets Boy 1975; Crimes Against
Nature 1978 (10 weeks); Last Summer at Bluefish Cove (1980), Marry Me a Little
1981; Torch Song Trilogy (1982), Evening with Quentin Crisp (1983), What’s a
Nice Country Like You…Doing in a State Like This 1985 (252); Ten Percent Revue
(1988), in Rage and Rehab (1989), Sex (1991), Crabtree’s Whoop-Dee-Doo 1993; The
Only Worse Thing You Could Have Told Me (1995), Porn (Rex Chandler) 1996 (395);
Naked Boys Singing 1999 (5 years July 22/04), among many others – theatre closed
- reopens with Blood Type: Ragu – Feb 20/09 – opening March 5/09;

Actor’s Society of America – formed 1895 – dissolved 1912

Actors’
Studio Drama School
(NYC)
- Three Sisters 1964


Actors’ Studio Theatre (NYC)
- 432 West 44th St. (9th & 10th) -
founded by Lee Strasburg in 1947 – Best Little Whorehouse in Texas 1977

Actors’ Temple – 339 W
47th St – newest off-Broadway house late 2006 – (est. 1923) – theater district landmark has fallen on hard times in recent years – Legendary members of the congregation included: Joey Adams, Jack Benny, Milton Berle, Red Buttons, Eddie Cantor, George Jessel, Al Jolson, Sandy Koufax, Jack E. Leonard, Danny Lewis (Jerry’s father), Joe E. Lewis, Tony Martin, Ritz Brothers, Edward G. Robinson, Sophie Tucker,William B. Williams, Shelly Winters, Henny Youngman.

Actor’s Theatre (NYC) – 1922 – housed in Greenwich Village Theatre and
Provincetown Playhouse – Beyond the Horizon (Judith Lowry,Aline MacMahon) 1926

Adelphi Theatre (NYC) – 54th Street East of Broadway – On The Town
1944 (463); Around the World (Cole Porter) 1946; Street Scene 1947; Look Ma I’m
Dancin’ 1948 – see George Abbott Theatre – demolished

Adelphi Theatre (NYC) – see Craig Theatre, 54th Street, George Abbott

Adolph Phillipps Theatre (NYC) – 1912 – see Bandbox Theatre

Adonis Theatre – 839 8th Avenue – started as Tivoli in 1921 – in 1970s
it became porn house – closed & demolished in 1990

Aerial Gardens (NYC) – see New Amsterdam Theatre

African Grove Theater (NYC) – 1821-1823 – Thomas Street, – West side
of Broadway between Duane & Anthony Sts -was a theater where black actors and
producers put on shows. Henry Brown was the artistic director who directed
Shakespearean plays including Othello and Hamlet – later moved to Bleecker and
Mercer Streets – pleasure garden theatre for black population – rear of City
Hospital

African Theatres – 1. near Anthony, below Canal St; 2. near Mercer
below Houston; 3. near Mercer above Houston

Al Hirschfield Theatre - see Martin Beck – Curtains 2008;

Alice Tully Hall – Lincoln Center – Broadway and 66th Street -
see Philharmonic Hall

Algonquin Hotel - see
Oak Room, Round Table, Algonquin Room – nightspot – Peccadillo Theater Company’s
world premiere of the original musical The Talk of the Town will feel very much
at home on May 23/05 when they move into their new quarters: Algonquin Hotel’s
Oak Room – Algonquin Round Table arose late in the second decade of the 20th
century when a press agent turned powerful drama critic Woollcott onto the
charms of the Algonquin Hotel’s Rose Room. Woollcott began inviting his friends
to dining hall including Vanity Fair writers Parker and Benchley, New York Times
drama editor and playwright Kaufman, novelist Edna Ferber, New York World
columnist Heywood Broun, playwright Robert Sherwood and popular columnist
Franklin P. Adams. Occasional joiners included actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn
Fontanne, Tallulah Bankhead, Ring Lardner, Harpo Marx and Broun’s wife Ruth Hale

Algonquin Room – see Algonquin Hotel

Algonquin Theater -
see Blue Heron Theater

Alhambra Theatre – vaudeville house -closed

Al Hirschfeld Theatre – 302 West 45th St – 1,437 seats – built as Martin Beck
Theatre 1924 – Madame Pompadour 1924 – housed Theatre Guild, Group Theatre,
Abbey Players and D’Oyly Cart Co – 2003 renamed Al Hirschfeld Theatre – Curtains
2008; How to Succeed in Business (revival) – 2011;

All Cartoon Movie Theatre(NYC) -see Bijou Theatre

Allen Room – see Frederick P. Rose Hall and Lincoln Center

Allerton (Bronx) – 1927 – 1,232 seats – Triplex; Closed

Alice Tully Hall – see
Lincoln Centre – reopened February 2009 – refurbished – interior now called
Starr Theatre and Allen Room
Allen Room – see Appel Room

Alpine Theatre – closed & demolished

*Altered Stages(NYC)
- 212 West 29th St. between 7th and 8th Avenues

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater – company formed 1958 – see Joan
Weill Center for Dance – moved into a new home on West 55th Street November 2004

Alvin Theatre (NYC) -250 West 52nd Street – (1344 seats) – opened 1927
with Funny Face (Fred and Adele Astaire) – see Neil Simon (renamed in 1983 in
honour of the playwright)- Girl Crazy 1930; Music in the Air 1932; Anything Goes
(Ethel Merman,Victor Moore) 1934 (over a year); Porgy and Bess 1935 (124); Red
Hot and Blue 1936; I’d Rather Be Right (George M. Cohan) 1937 (9 mos); Boys From
Syracuse 1938; Very Warm For May 1939; Lady in the Dark 1941; Something For The
Boys (Ethel Merman) 1943 (422); Billion Dollar Baby 1945; Tree Grows in Brooklyn
(Shirley Booth) 1951 (267); Darkness at Noon (Claude Rains) 1951; Two’s Company
1952; House of Flowers 1954; No Time For Sergeants 1955 (796); Oh Captain (Tony
Randall) 1958 (192); First Impressions 1959; Greenwillow (Anthony Perkins,Pert
Kelton,Cecil Kellaway) 1960 (97); Wildcat (Lucille Ball) 1960 (171); Funny Thing
Happened on the Way to the Forum 1962; High Spirits 1964; Flora the Red Menace
1965; Yearling 1965; Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Brian Murray,John
Wood)1967 (421); It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane…It’s Superman 1966; Great White Hope
1968 (556); Company 1970 (690); Shenandoah 1975; Annie 1977; Merrily We Roll
Along 1981(Jason Alexander,Liz Callaway)(16); Do Black Patent Leather Shoes
Really Reflect Up? 1982;

AMAS Repertory (NYC) – 4 Guys Named Jose; Beowulf 1977

Amateur Theatre – see Lyceum (3rd)

Amato Opera Space – closed May 31/09 – Bleecker Street and Amore Operas were then formed by its split company – 2010 – its first and basement floors as a 100-seat theatre space, adding a second floor restaurant with space for 70

*
Ambassador
- 215 West 49th St. opened 1921(Shubert-seats 1124)-
First of six theatres the Shuberts will build on 48th and 49th Streets – opening
show was Rose Girl 1921; followed by Blossom Time 1921 (576); Queen High 1921;
Great Gatsby (Florence Eldridge) 1926 (14 weeks); Racket 1927 (119); Night of
January 16 (Walter Pidgeon) 1935 (232); Straw Hat Revue 1939 (Danny Kaye,Alfred
Drake,Imogene Coca,Jerome Robbins); showed films in the 1940s – 1956 became
legitimate again – Eugenia (Tallulah Bankhead) 1957 (12); You Know I Can’t Hear
You When the Water’s Running 1967 (755);Celebration 1969; dark 1973-74; Me and
Bessie 1974 (453); Godspell (1976) appeared at 3 theatres after leaving
off-Broadway (Ambassador, Broadhurst and Plymouth to log up 2,124 performances);
Eubie (Gregory Hines,Maurice Hines) 1978 (439); Division Street (John
Lithgow,Christine Lahti) 1980 (21); Lion in Winter, Miss Margarida’s Way, Leader
of the Pack 1985; Ain’t Misbehavin – revival 1988 (176); Bring in da Noise,
Bring in Da Funk 1996; You’re a Good Man Charlie brown (revival B.D. Wong) 1999;
Ride Down Mount Morgan 2000; Class Act 2001; Chicago (revival) moved here 2003;

AMC Empire 25 – 234 W 42nd Streets newest theatre complex which has
incorporated other theatres – Harris Theatre will be joined with the Empire
(built 1912 as Eltinge became Empire 1954 after original Empire demolished at
B’Way & 40th St) and Liberty Theatres to form part of the AMC movie complex and
Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum – The Harris in1933 turned to films for 55 years -
theatre will be gutted and be part of Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum

American Airlines Theatre – formerly Selwyn 1918 – six theaters known as the Apollo, Liberty, Lyric, Selwyn, Times Square and Victory – (The Empire theater came under The New 42nd Street’s master lease once it was fully restored in April 2000) – renamed American Airlines Theatre July 2000 – Importance of Being Earnest 2011;

American Academy of Dramatic Arts
- founded 1884 at the Lyceum Theatre School for Acting – for a time used the
name New York School of Acting – 1974 opened a West Coast branch in Pasadena

*American Airlines
Theatre
- 229 West 42nd Street – built as Selwyn Theatre – 1918 -
740 seats – Prodigal Daughter 1893 – From 1934 to the 1990s was a movie house –
in 2000 theatre was restored by Roundabout Theatre Company and renamed American
Airlines – Royal Family 1927 (343), Information Please, Crowded Hour, Buddies -
reopened as American Airlines Theatre (750 seats)- Man Who Came to Dinner
(Nathan Lane) 2000;The Women (Cynthia Nixon,Jennifer Tilly,Kristen Johnston,Rue
McClanahan)2001; Caretaker 2003;39 Steps 2008; Importance of Being Earnest 2011;

American Comedy Institute

American Company – mid 1700s most famous and long-lived troupe of
travelling professional actors – eventually based at the John Street Theatre –
moved to new Park Theatre

American Dramatic Fund Association – founded 1848 – abandoned with
founding of Actors; Fund of America

American Globe Theatre

*American Jewish
Theatre
(NYC)
- see Maverick Theatre – 307 West 26th St.- Bertha The
Sewing Machine Girl 1906 (9)

American Laboratory Theatre (NYC) –1920s – training school and
producing company

American Museum – opened 1810 – moved several times and was
housed at Broadway and Ann Street – 1841 when P.T. Barnum took charge in 1842
became accepted as Barnum’s Museum – remodelled 1949 into full-fledged theatre
seating 3,000 – enlarged 1850 – 1865 building burnt down – reopened but
destroyed by fire again 1868

American Music Hall- 141 E 55th Street 1930 – originally a
church – see American Theatre

American National Theatre and Academy – 1935 – 1950 purchases the
Guild Theatre and renamed it the ANTA

American National Theatre and Academy – proposed for site of the World
Trade Center (Ground Zero)ANT to build a complex housing three-theatres (of
1,000, 700, and 400 seats) with 15-play season – ANT would not produce new work,
instead an advisory board would select the 15 best regional productions and
transfer them to the WTC site, in essence becoming a showcase for the best of
American theatre

American Negro Theatre(NYC) – founded in Harlem – 1940 by playwright
Abram Hill and actors Frederick O’Neal and Austin Briggs-Hall – presented
original scripts at 135th Street Branch of New York Public Library – first
production was Natural Man 1941 – company abandoned early 1950s

American Opera Company – 1885 – Academy of Music

American Opera Society – 1951 – Carnegie Hall

American Opera House – see Chatham Theatre

*American Place
Theatre
- 111 West 46th St.(between 6th Ave & Broadway)- 300 seats
- founded in 1964 – 2 smaller spaces of 299 and 74 seats – (currently under
renovation by Roundabout Theatre) original group founded in 1963 at St.
Clement’s Church and moved to present location in 1971 – opened with Fingernails
Blue as Flowers and Lake of the Woods – Hogan’s Goat 1965 (607); Karl Marx Play
1973; Cold Storage (Martin Balsam) 1977 (6 weeks); A…My Name Will Always Be
Alice 1984; I’m Not Rappaport (Judd Hirsch,Cleavon Little) 1985 (181 -
transferred to Booth Theatre); Night and Her Stars 1995; Runt 2001 (100 perf.
Aug 19/01)- see also information at Studio 54 as being taken over by Roundabout,
and Harold and Miriam Steinberg
Center for Theatre
, and Laura Pels, and Black Box Theatre

American Repertory Theatre – 1946 – housed in old theatre on Columbus
Circle – disbanded at end of 1st season

American Roof Garden – above American Music Hall – earlier
called American Theatre 1893

American Show Shop – see Edyth Totten Theatre

American Theatre
- 1893 – 260 West 42nd Street and 8th Avenue – 1893 – with entrances on
41st, 42nd and 8th Avenues – 2100 seats – opened with Prodigal Daughter 1893 –
featured 10 horses running across stage – Voyage of Suzette with Maxine Elliott
and Harry Davenport; 1908 renamed American Music Hall, had American Roof Garden
– above American Music Hall – atmospheric – 1911 became Loew’s American Theatre
– then burlesque house 1929 – burned 1930 and never reopened as a theatre –
demolished 1932 – now a parking lot; 2nd American Music Hall opened 1934 in
converted church at 139-41 East 55th Street; American (Bronx) – 1939 -1,400
seats Movies, 7-plex

American Theatre Critics Association – founded 1974

* American Theater for
Actors
- 314 West 54th St – houses 3 theatres – Chernuchin – 140 seats,
Beckmann – 45 seats , Sargeant – 65 seats – see ATA – Urinetown 2001

American Theatre Wing – established 1939 – established the Stage Door Canteen

<strong)American Yiddish Theatre

Amusement Park (NYC) – Freedomland U.S.A. 1960

Anco Theatre (NYC) – see Lew M. Fields Theatre, Hackett, Harris,
Frazee, Wallack’s

Anderson Theatre – was located at 66 2nd Ave. in the lower east side
of NYC – 5,000 seats – theater entrance structure is still there but it is now a
pharmacy – theater wrapped around a corner building and part of the theater was
also on the south side of 4th Street. The 4th St. side of the theater long gone
- began as Yiddish Playhouse circa late 1800s or early 1900s, then used as a
music venue in the late 1960s – Rock n’Roll Hall of Fame Group, the Yardbirds
(1968); Cockettes – early 1970s

Angelika 57 – closed & demolished

Angelika Film Center – open

Anne G. Wilder Theater (NYC) – 416 West 42nd Street see Playwrights
Horizon

Ansbacher Theatre – see Public Theatre – Hair 1967

Ansonia Baths – (see Continental Baths – became known as “The
Tubs,” west 70s – performances by Bette Midler, Barry Manilow

Anspacher Theatre – see Public Theatre

ANT – see American Negro Theatre

ANTA (American National Theatre and Academy) – 245 West 52nd St.
– (see Virginia) – built by Theatre Guild 1925 – opened as Guild Theatre with
Caesar and Cleopatra 1925 – changed 1950 to Anta Playhouse and Anta Theatre in
1954 – in 1981 became Virginia – theatre sold in 1981 – renovated 1995 – Second
Man 1927 (178), Porgy 1927 (217), Marco Millions 1928 (92), Mourning Becomes
Electra 1931 (157), Ah Wilderness 1933 (289), End of Summer 1936 (152),
Biography 1932 (267);Seventh Heaven 1955; Great Sebastians (Alfred Lunt and Lynn
Fontanne) 1956; Say Darling 1958; J.B. 1958 (364);Middle of the Night (Edward G.
Robinson,Gena Rowlands) 1956 (477),Thurber Carnival (Paul Ford,Peggy Cass,John
McGiver,Alice Ghostley,Tom Ewell) 1960 (16 weeks and additional 12 weeks later);
Man for All Seasons 1961 (637); Blues For Mr. Charlie (Rip Torn,Al Freeman Jr)
1964 (148); Owl and the Pussycat(Alan Alda,Diana Sands) 1964 (421); Royal Hunt
of the Sun (Christopher Plummer,David Carradine) 1965 (261); Maggie Flynn 1968;
Different Times 1972; Cat on a Hot Tin Roof – revival-(Elizabeth Ashley,Keir
Dullea,Fred Gwynne,Kate Reid) 1974 (160);Bubbling Brown Sugar 1976 (766); Summer
Brave (Alexis Smith)1975, Heartaches of a Pussycat 1980; Oh, Brother 1981;

A.N.T.A Washington Square Theatre – opened 1964 with After the
Fall (208); But For Whom Charlie (Ralph Meeker)(47); Man of La Mancha (Richard
Kiley,Joan Denier) 1965 (2328)- moved to Martin Beck, then the Eden and Mark
Hellinger, – torn down

Anthony Street Theatre – 79-85 Worth Street – 1812 opened as
Olympic Theatre – theatre was built by the Circus of Pepin and Breschard which
was a French/Spanich circus which toured the US from 1807 until 1815. They also
built The Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia and intoduced at least one
Shakespeare’s play to America – 1813 became present name – later became
Commonwealth and the Pavillion – demolished 1821

Apartment 929 – new theatre company – MOTEL BLUES – 2004

Apollo Hall (Fifth Avenue Theatre) 1873 – lower Broadway (5
points Park,Worth & Orange later Baxter) – several name changes and burned in
1891 and was rebuilt as vaudeville/film and burlesque theatre operated by Minsky
- torn down in 1938 (depicted in film Gangs of New York)

*Apollo Theatre -
253 West 125th Street (between Adam Clayton Powell Blvd & Frederick Douglass
Blvd) – 1,463 seats – (2009 75th Anniversary) – opened in 1914, blacks were not
allowed in the audience – originally known as Hurtig & Seamon’s (New) Burlesque
Theater – 1928 the building was taken over William Minsky – renamed the theater,
125th Street Apollo Theater, and changed from burlesque to variety shows geared
to growing black population – 1934, its first black patrons were allowed in -
amateur nights began – comedians from Milton Berle, Pigmeat Markham and Moms Mabley to Bill Cosby, Richard
Pryor, Chris Rock and Dave Chappelle; and dazzlingly dressed singing groups and bands like Louis Armstrong, Peal Bailey 1965, Count Basie, James Brown 2006 (body lay in state on the stage), Cab Calloway, Ray Charles,
Chantels, Sammy Davis Jr., Miles Davis, Fats Domino 1958, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Four Tops, Aretha Franklin, Lionel Hampton, Jimi Hendrix, Billie Holiday, Isley Brothers, Jackson Five, Gladys Knight and the Pips, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebells, Dizzy Gillespie, Harlem Song 2002, Lena Horne, Jewel Box Revue 1968, Johnny Mathis, Stephanie Mills, Thelonius Monk, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Bobby Short, Supremes, Temptations, Leslie Uggams, Sarah Vaughan, Dionne Warwick – -closed
from 1976 to 1978 – refurbished – $6 million renovation, the theater is planning
to install a production with an open-ended run – theater is to start its
renovation in June 2001- Dance Theater of Harlem will perform its season at the
Apollo; Dreamgirls (revival) Nov 2009 – Apollo Music Cafe; 2nd Apollo – Apollo Theatre (NYC)
-223 West 42nd Street – built 1920 (1194 seats) opened as Bryant in 1910 for
vaudeville and films – rebuilt as the Apollo – opened with Jimmie (Oscar
Hammerstein II) (71); Macbeth 1921 (Lionel Barrymore); Poppy 1921 (W.C.Fields);
George White’s Scandals 1924; and 1926 (424); Manhattan Mary (Ed Wynn) 1927
(264); Flying High (Bert Lahr,Kate Smith) 1930 (347); Take a Chance 1932 (Ethel
Merman); Blackbirds of 1933 – closed 1933 to show movies, became burlesque house
from 1934 to 1937 but in 1938 returned to foreign films and in 1968 action films
- 1978 renovated and entrance moved to 43rd Street – back to live theatre as the
New Apollo – On Golden Pond 1979, Bent (Richard Gere) (240), Fifth of July 1980
(511) – Guys in the Truck 1983 and in 1983 returned to showing films – name
changed to the Academy – featuring rock concerts – gutted in 1996 along with the
Lyric to build Ford Centre for the Performing Arts engulfing the Apollo and
Lyric theatres; 3 other theatres were Apollo for short time – Third Avenue
Variety Theatre 1885; Playhouse on Chuter Street 1926 and a burlesque house on
125th Street – West 43rd façade still standing

Apollo (Bryant) – 1910 -1,197 seats – Razed, parts salvaged

Apollo (lower east side) – 1925 – 1,712 seats – Razed

Appel Room – formerly Allen Room at Jazz at Lincoln Center

Applause Books – 211 West 71st Street – opened 1980 – closing June
30/05 after 25 years in business

Archstone Clinton Building – 53rd and 10th Avenue – 2 new 99 seat theatres 2013

*Arci’s Place - 450
Park Avenue South (between 30th and 31st Streets) – opened 1998 as an intimate
cabaret venue – closing March 15/02 – to open a new space in theatre district
July/August 2002 – Arci’s Place opened its doors in 1998, and its first
headliner was current Mamma Mia! star Karen Mason, Donna McKechnie, Christine
Ebersole, Sam Harris, Tom Wopat, Marilyn Sokol, Baby Jane Dexter, John
Barrowman, Carol Woods, Margaret Whiting, Priscilla Lopez, Paige Price

*ArcLight
Theater
- 152 West 71st St (between 6th Ave & Broadway) – 99 seat
theatre in basement of a church

Arden Theatre – closed & demolished
Area – nightclub and art gallery 1983-1987 – Warhol/Kruger/Haring – 157 Hudson St – building built 1866 to house stabes of American Express Company

Arena Theatre – closed & demolished

Armondo’s – 54 East 55th – 1940s nightclub

Armory – see Bowery Amphitheatre

*Arno
Ristorante
- 141 West 38th Street (between Broadway and 7th
Avenue) – Murdered By The Mob – in its 5th year

Ars Nova Theatre – 511 West
54th Street (between 10th & 11th Aves)- space to develop and perform new works
in an intimate setting – ARS NOVA PGM is a film, television, and theatre
production company that owns and operates The Ars Nova Theater, a 99-seat
theatre space

A.R.T.

Artef Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre, Mercury, President,
Midget, American Show Shop, Gilmore’s, 48th Street, Erwin, Piscator’s Dramatic
Workshop and Comedy Theatre

Art Greenwich (Twin) – Greenwich Avenue and West 12th Street – closed
February 2001

Arthur – opened 1965 by Sybil Burton at site of the defunct El Morocco

Artists Crossing – new theatre company and school

Art Party – see Zipper Theatre – new company formed 2002 by Alan
Cumming and associates

Arts Connection – 120 West 46th Street

Arts Theater – 299 seats – Dirty Linen/New-Found-Land 1976 (1667);

Assembly Theatre – see Princess Theatre

Association for the Promotion and Protection of an Independent Stage in
the United States
– founded 1897-8

Association of Producing Artists (APA) – 1960 – later became resident
company at University of Michigan at Ann Arbor – 1964 joined Phoenix Theatre

Astor Hotel – 44th Street – 1930s had a nightclub Astor Cocktail
Lounge -Fly With Me 1920

Astor House – Broadway & Vesey St – 1836 – catered to specialized
clientele

Astor Library – Hair opened here in 1967 before transferring to
Broadway in 1968, stopping off first at a discotheque on the Upper West Side

* Astor Place Opera House
– Broadway at E 8th St & Astor Place – built for Italian Opera in 1847 –
Macbeth 1849 – anti-English mobs set fire to the theatre 1849 – minstrel shows -
theatre repaired and reopened – closed 1850 – 1854 building was renamed Clinton
Hall – a library and lecture room – demolished 1860s

*Astor Place
Theatre
- 434 Layfayette St. (7th & 8th)- residential building
converted to theatre in 1969 (298 seats) – Paid in Full 1908 (167), Man From
Home 1908 (496), Seven Days 1909 (397), Why Marry 1917 (120), Seven Keys to
Baldpate 1913 (320), Hit-The-Trail Holliday 1915 (336), East is West 1918 (680),
Boss 1911 (88), Indian Wants the Bronx (Al Pacino,John Cazale)/It’s Called the
Sugar Plum (Marsha Mason) 1968 – converted to a theatre in 1969 (298) – Peace
1969 (192); Gertrude Stein’s First Reader 1969; Dirtiest Show in Town 1970
(509); Blue Man Group in recent years – Cockeyed Tiger, Family Business,
Dirtiest Show in Town 1970(509), My Astonishing Self (Donal Donnelly) 1978;
Dining Room 1982 (583), Foreigner 1984 (686), Tubes 1991 (over 900 performances); Blue Man Group;

Astor Plaza – 44th and Broadway – 1,440-seats – opened in 1974 – to be
converted into live rock concert hall. Leaving only two multiplexes (Loews
E-Walk and AMC Empire 25) in the area, on West 42nd Street near 8th Avenue – no
single-screen motion picture theaters left in the area

Astor Theatre -built 1906 – 1537 Broadway at 45th Street – 1,300
seats – opened with A Midsummer Night’s Dream 1906 with Annie Russell and John
Bunny; 1925 became a film house for 50 years – closed in 1972 – with adjoining
Victoria, Helen Hayes, Morosco and Bijou Theatres became a new hotel tower -
plans were delayed due to the glut of office space – in 1982 the five theatres
were demolished – Tom Jones 1908; Hawthorne of the U.S.A. (Douglas Fairbanks Sr)
1912; Seven Keys to Baldpate; Hello Broadway; Hit-the-Trail Holliday; Why Marry;
Rock-A-Bye Baby; Artists and Models; Sweet Little Devil (Gershwin); 1913 film
Quo Vadis (22 weeks); Her Soldier Boy 1916 (198); Why Marry? 1917; East is West
1918 (680); Artists and Models 1924; June Days 1925 (11 weeks) – 1925 converted
to films – 1959 renovated – 1982 along with 4 other theatres razed for Marquis
Hotel which houses The Minskoff

Astoria Performing Arts Center (APAC) – young Equity company that has
operated as guests of The Presbyterian Church of Astoria for four years, is
experiencing growing pains – growing troupe left the church in recent weeks and
is seeking a new home in Astoria, the Queens community across the East River
from Manhattan

Astoria Performing Arts Center -
31-30 33rd Street, Astoria

Astoria Theatre – opened 1920, as a vaudeville house – acquired by Loew’s in 1923 – In 1977, UA divided the theater into four screens, and then, in 1981, converted the remaining dressing areas in the back of the building into two additional theaters, bringing the theater up to sixplex status – named the UA Astoria Sixplex when it closed on Dec. 26, 2001 – now used for office space and retail

*ATA
(American Theatre of Actors)
– 314 West 54th Street – 3 theatres Chernuchin
(140 seats); Sargent (65) and Beckmann (35)

Athenaeum – see Globe Theatre, A.T. Stewart’s Athenaeum

Atlantic Garden – beside Thalia Theatre – demolished 1916

* Atlantic Theater
- 336 West 20th St. (182)- founded 1985 by David Mamet among others – housed in 100 yr old former church – Atlantic Company
moved here in 1991 – Santaland Diaries 1996 (63); Hothouse 1999; Brave 1999 -
the company will relocate its second stage to 111 Eighth Avenue, between 15th
and 16th Streets – new space will house 99-seat black box theatre at 330 W 16th
St – expected to be fully operable in January 2006 as Linda Gross Theatre
- 165 seats – mainstage home remains on West 20th Street

Atlas Theatre – closed
Atmospheric Theatres

A.T. Stewart’s Athenaeum – see Globe Theatre

Audubon Theatre – 1912 – 2,368 seats – Razed, 1996 (c) & demolished

Audrey Wood Theatre 0 Kuni-Leml 1984; Love 1984

August Wilson Theatre – new name of Virginia Theatre as of Oct 17/05 – 1,257 seats -
in honour of playwright – Jersey Boys 2005 (longest running show at this theatre);

Automatic Vaudeville Company – 14th Street – 1903

Aux Puces – one of the first gay discos

Avalon(Bronx) – 1927 – 1,440 seats – Razed, 1951 (c.); 2nd – Avalon
Theatre
– 1927 – Brooklyn

Avenue Playhouse – closed

*Avery
Fisher Hall
- see Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center)- home to New
York Philharmonic – but moving back to Carnegie Hall in the upcoming future – being renovated so closed for next two seasons starting 2013;

Avon 42 – closed

Avon Hudson – see Hudson

Avon-at-the-Hudson -see Henry Miller’s Theatre

Avon Theatre -see Klaw Theatre – 251 West 45th St – opened as
Klaw Theatre 1921 – Nive People 1921; Strictly Dishonorable 1929 (557) – 1934
leased to CBS for studio – few years later bought outright – theatre demolished
1954

B

Babalu
Restaurant/Theatre/Night Club
– 323 West 44th Street (between 8th & 9th
Aves)
Baby Grand – long vanished Harlem jazz venue

Backdrop – 52nd Street – hot spot where Frank Loesser began practicing
his craft

Backstage (Ted Hook’s Backstage) – 318 West 45th Street -
intimate cabaret/restaurant – Ethel Merman, Debbie Reynolds, Chita Rivera, Anne
Miller, Liza Minnelli

Backstage Club – 56th Street – nightclub owned by Billy Rose

Ballets Grandiva – 1996

Ballet Trockadero de Monte Carlo – 1974 – small Greenwich Village
venues i.e. Westside Discussion group on W. 14th St; Joyce Theatre and tour
extensively

Ballroom – Chelsea cabaret of 1970s – Charles Pierce 1988;
Eartha Kitt, Martha Raye, Yma Sumac, Margaret Whiting

*BAM (Brooklyn
Academy of Music)
– (Harvey Theatre – 875 seats) – 651 Fulton Street, Fort
Greene, Brooklyn; Howard Gilman Opera House – 2000 seats – 30 Lafayette St -
winner of Regional Theatre Tony Award 1988 – Long Day’s Journey into Night
(Jason Robards Jr.,Zoe Caldwell) 1976 (11); Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour
Dreamcoat; American Premiere of Hamlet 2001 – 3rd theatre space (Samuel Scripps
Stage, interior dubbed Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman Space) – 263 seat black box
to open 2013 behind Gilman Opera House

BAM Rose Cinemas – 30 Lafayette, Brooklyn – 1998, previously Helen
Carey Playhouse – built as Majestic 1903 – turned into Harvey Theatre, former
2110 seat historic Opera House – now all part of BAM

Bamboo Club – 7th Avenue, Harlem nightclub 1930s

Bandbox Theatre – opened 1912 as Adolph Phillip Theatre – 1914
changed to present name– 205 East 57th Street – (299 seats)- closed 1917 and
cinema was built on site; 2nd – Bandbox – nightclub across from Connie’s – 131st Street – 1930s; 3rd – Bandbox Theatre – 57th Street and 3rd Avenue

*Bank Street Theatre
- 155 Bank Street (between Washington & West St)

Banvard’s Museum – see Daly’s Theatre

Barbarann Theatre Restaurant – Starting Here Starting Now 1977 –
Demolished

Barbe’s – rock club

Barbizon Plaza – Shoestring ’57 1956

Barney’s – 86 University Place – nightclub 1930s

Barnum’s American Museum – (see Chinese Rooms, Buckley’s Minstel
Hall) – lower Broadway (5 Points Park, Worth & Orange (later Baxter) – Tony
Pastor 1846; Drunkard or the Fallen Saved 1850 (100)– (depicted in film Gangs of
New York) – corner Ann St & Broadway – joining Park Theatre, City Hall Park,
City Hall and Astor House – originally Scudder’s Museum – 3,000 seats – 1865
burned down – became New York Herald’s offices

Barnum’s New Museum – opened in 1865

Baron Wilkens – 7th Avenue and 134th Street – 1920s – Wilkens murdered
1926

Baronet Theatre – 1920s to 2001 – 993 3rd Avenue – opened as Arcadia -
demolished

Barrow Street Theatre – 27 Barrow Street – formerly Greenwich House
Theatre -new rental space – up to 199 seats – Bug 2004

Barrymore’s Restaurant - 267 West 45th Street – theatrical restaurant -
closing its doors end of January 2006

Barrymore Theatre – see Ethel Barrymore Theatre

Barry’s Theater – 5 points – Park, Worth & Orange (later Baxter) – Uncle
Tom’s Cabin (depicted in film Gangs of New York)

Bar-Tini- gay bar in Hell’s Kitchen featuring cabaret – Ultra Lounge – Paige Turner, Russell Fischer

Baruch College – Bernie West Theater at 17 Lexington Avenue

Baryshnikov Center for Dance – housed in new building—along with three
off-Broadway theaters—in complex at 450 W. 37th Street (between 9th and 10th).
Scheduled to open in the summer of 2003/4

Basement Brownies – West 133rd St – nightclub 1930s

Basin Street – 51st Street – nightclub 1950s

Basin Street East – nightclub 1940s – Duke Ellington (1963-1964);
Peggy Lee (1960)

Bay Cinema – closed & demolished

B.B. King Blues Club and Grill – 550-seat club that presents blues,
rock and jazz music in the E Walk entertainment complex on the north side of
42nd Street, near Eighth Avenue.

Beacon -
2124 Broadway at 74th St. – built in 1929 as Warner’s Beacon (2,894 seats) as film house – has housed vaudeville, rock, ballet, opera – still used for
performances – Michael Jackson, Earth, Wind and Fire, Grateful Dead, Hall and Oates, James Taylor, Queen, Aerosmith, Liza Minelli, Allman Brothers, Young Man,Older Woman 1995 – renovated – reopens Feb 13/14,2009 with Paul Simon; home to 2011 Tony Awards;

Beast of
Belgium

Beckmann Theatre – see American Theatre for Actors

Beekman Street Theatre – 1952 – 597 seats -Razed, 2005 – see Chapel
Street Theatre

*Belasco
– West 42nd Street – (see New Victory) – originally known as Republic
Theatre; 2nd Theatre – opened as Stuyvesant Theatre 1907 – 111 West 44th St.
(Shubert-1,016 seats) – opened with A Grand Army Man 1907 – renamed Belasco 1910
– 1935-1941 was headquarters of Group Theatre –1910 changed to the Belasco -
later returned to Republic Theatre – Darling of the Gods 1902 (182), Music
Master 1904 (627); Girl of the Golden West 1905 (224), Music Master 1904 (627),
Polly With a Past 1917 (315), Return of Peter Grimm 1911 (231), Rose of the
Rancho 1906 (327), Easiest Way 1909 (157), Secret 1913 (143); Boomerang 1915
(522), Kiki 1921 (600); Hit the Deck 1927 (352), Lulu Belle 1926 (461), Dead End
1935 (687), Awake and Sing 1935 (184), Gentle People 1939 (141), Golden Boy 1937
(250), Gentle People Sam Jaffe,Franchot Tone) 1939; Kiki (600), Mr. & Mrs. North
1941; Clash by Night (Lee J. Cobb,Tallulah Bankhead) 1941; Mrs. January and Mr X
(Billie Burke,Barbara Bel Geddes) 1944; used for broadcasting 1949-1953 when it
was once again a theatre -Solid Gold Cadillac 1953 (526) – became NBC studio –
1953 back to legitimate Belasco – apartment residence of David Belasco 11 rooms, supposedly haunted by
his ghost – All The Way Home 1960 (334), Killing of Sister George
(Beryl Reed,Eileen Atkins) 1966 (205); Oh Calcutta (over 1300 performances total
- 704 Off Broadway); Almost Perfect Person, American Buffalo 1977 (135); Rocky
Horror Show (Tim Curry) 1980; Crucible (Michael York,Martin Sheen,Martha Scott)
1991 (32); A Little More Magic 1994 (Famous People);James Joyce’s The Dead
(Christopher Walken,Blair Brown,Emily Skinner,Alice Ripley) 2000 (transferred
from Playwrights’ Horizon); If You Ever Leave Me…I’m Going With You (Joseph
Bologna,Renee Taylor) 2001;Follies (Blythe Danner,Treat Williams,Gregory
Harrison,Marge Champion,Joan Roberts) 2001;Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de
Lune (Edie Falco,Stanley Tucci)2002; Enchanted April; Passing Strange 2008; End of the Rainbow (Tracie Bennett) 2012;

Belmont – You and I 1923 (174), Hero 1921 (80), Miss Lulu Bett 1920
(201) – demolished

Belmont Playhouse – 2385 Arthur Avenue, Bronx

Belmont Plaza – Glass Hat room – famous nightspot

Belmont Theatre – see JackNorworth Theatre – 125 West 48th St –
originally Norworth built 1918 – Odds and Ends 1917 1918 (moved from Bijou) -
name changed 3 months later to Belmont Theatre – no success until Miss Lulu Bett
1920; Kempy 1922 Crops and Croppers; You and I 1923; Young Woodley 1925 (260+
perf); – vacant 1933-36 became cinema 1936 – ret’d to legitimate – 1937
converted to films – demolished 1951


Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre
– name changed from Royale as of May 9/05 – see
Royale Theatre – 1,078 seats – That Championship Season (revival) – 2011;Once 9Steve Kazee/Cristin Milloti)2012;

Bernie West Theatre – Baruch College’s Bernie West Theater – 17 Lexington
Avenue

Bert Wheeler Theatre – 250 West 43rd Street between Broadway and 8th
Avenue – named after actor comedian/actor Bert Wheeler (1895-1968) – Autumn’s
Here 1966; Curley McDimple with Bernadette Peters 1967 (931), Christy 1975 –
demolished

Beverley Theatre – closed & demolished

Big Apple – famous Harlem nightclub – 7th Avenue – Billie Holiday
1936 – now a pharmacy

Big Top Cinema – 1604 Broadway at 49th St – became male porn house in mid
1970s –open 24 hours – closed & demolished

Bijou Cinema – closed

Bijou Opera House – (see Brighton Theatre) – opened 1880 at Broadway
between 30th and 31st St as the Brighton Theatre in 1878 – Sparks 1882; Adonis
1884 (603), Climbers 1901 (163), Gentleman From Mississippi 1908 (407)

Bijou Theatre – 1239 Broadway – started as saloon – opened as the
Brighton 1878 – also known as Wood’s Broadway Theatre and Broadway Opera House –
Lillian Russell 1882 – Adonis 1884 (603); Nancy Brown 1903; Mr. Wix of Wickham
(Julian Eltinge) 1904; Skidding (448); 1883 demolished and a larger theatre
built, the Bijou – demolished 1915; 2nd Bijou Theatre – 209 West 45th St – built
1917 – 603 seats – adjacent to Morosco Theatre – opened with The Knife (11
weeks) 1917; His Honor, Abe Potash 1919 (215); Dover Road 1921; What Every Woman
Knows 1926 (Helen Hayes); Springtime for Henry 1931 (199)- 1931 became a cinema
the Toho, showing Japanese films – in 1935 was all-cartoon movie theatre – Sap
Runs High 1936; dark from 1936 to 1943 – reopened as theatre 1945 – Life With
Father moved from Empire; Cave Dwellers; movies from 1947 to 1953 and another 6
years of stage shows – Moon For the Misbegotten 1957 (68); 1959 Bijou closed
while Astor Theatre was expanded and reopened in 1962 as the D.W. Griffith – a
300 seat cinema – 1962-1972 became Toho Cinema and back to the Bijou in 1965
until 1970 when Foreplay 1970 did a brief stint; Enemy is Dead 1973; and
Mummenshantz 1977 (1326), Moon For The Misbegotten 1957 (68); Potting Shed
(Sybil Thorndyke) 1957; Play’s The Thing (David Dukes) 1973 (11 weeks) – 1981
became film theatre – demolished 1982 for the Marriott Marquis Hotel along with
the Morosco, Astor, Victoria and Helen Hayes; 3rd Bijou – 200 seats in off
Broadway Playhouse Theatre at 359 West 48th St – opened 1970

Billie Holiday Theatre
– Restoration Plaza, 1368 Fulton St, Brooklyn – 200 seats

Billy Munk – Love Death Plays of William Inge – demolished

Billy Rose – see Nederlander – 208 West 41st St – opened 1921 as
National (1162 seats) – opened with Swords 1921; Cat and the Canary 1922 -
alterations 1941 and in 1959 bought by Billy Rose and given his name – chnaged
to Trafalgar in 1979 – Family Affair 1962; Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (Uta
Hagen,Arthur Hill,Melinda Dillon,George Grizzard) 1962 (664); Earl of Ruston
1971; Heathen 1972; Who’s Life is it Anyway – then theatre renamed Nederlander
in 1980
Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe – elaborate supper club – Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe was quite the thing — “the most zestful, gorgeous and lovable pleasure palace in town,” opened in December 1938. Buried deep in the basement of what is now the Paramount Hotel on West 46th Street in Manhattan, the theater transported audiences back to New York in the Gay Nineties, the era of Diamond Jim Brady and Lillian Russell, in a revue stacked with old vaudeville troupers and glamorous showgirls – 1938 to closing in 1951 – newly renovated 2013 – opening with Queen of the Night, New Year’s Eve for 6 weeks only – see also Paramount Hotel

Billy Rose’s Music Hall – 1697 Broadway at 53rd St – see
Hammerstein’s Theatre

Biltmore Hotel – 44th Street – famous nightspot

*Biltmore
Theatre
– see Samuel J. Friedman Theatre (renamed as of Sept 4/08) -
261-5 West 47th St. (Nederlander) – reopening 2003 as home to Manhattan Theatre
Club (after being closed 16 years) – originally opened 1925 with Easy Come Easy
Go (Victor Moore) (transferred from George M. Cohan Theatre) – 948 seats – first
hit 1928 Pleasure Man with Mae West (closed by police) – Manhattan Theater Club
has agreed to renovate and take over operation of Biltmore Theater – Kongo
(Walter Huston) 1926; Loose Ankles (Osgood Perkins); The Barker (Walter
Huston,Claudette Colbert) 1927; Tin Pan Alley Claudette Colbert); Pleasure Man
(Mae West) 1928; Children of Darkness, Philip Goes Forth, Carry Nation (James
Stewart,Mildred Natwick,Joshua Logan), Big Hearted Herbert, Brother Rat 1936
(577), What a Life (Butterfly McQueen,Eddie Bracken) 1938 (538), My Sister
Eileen (Shirley Booth) 1940 (864); Kiss and Tell (Richard Widmark) 1943 (957);
Heiress (Wendy Hiller,Basil Rathbone) 1947 (410), from 1952-1962 used for
broadcasting and then back to theatre – Take Her She’s Mine (Art
Carney,Elizabeth Ashley) 1961; Man in the Moon 1963; Barefoot in the Park Robert
(Redford,Elizabeth Ashley) 1963 (1532), Hair 1968 (1742); Find Your Way Home
(Michael Moriarty); Robber Bridegroom (Barry Bostwick) 1976, Appearing Nightly
(Lily Tomlin)1977 (84), Kingfisher (Claudette Colbert,Rex Harrison), Cheaters,
Knock Knock, Murder Among Friends, Staircase, Up in One, Butterflies Are Free,
Honky Tonk Nights, Boys of Winter, A Woman of Independent Means, Whodunnit,
Deathtrap (transferred from Music Box), A Talent for Murder (Claudette Colbert),
To Grandmother’s House We Go, American Clock, Nuts, Doonesbury 1983 – leased to
CBS in 1951 for 10 years as Studio No 62 – then back to legitimate theatre –
last show was Stardust 1987 and in Dec. 1987 arsonists set fire on stage and in
auditorium and vandals left theatre in unsafe condition; Following a fire in
1987, building suffered damage from rain coming through the ceiling and abuse
from vandals; Federal Theatre Project presented works there in the 1930 and the
theatre was later run by Warner Bros. as home for theatre director George
Abbott’s productions. From 1952-61, the theatre was leased to CBS – refurbished
and reopened 2003 with The Violet Hour (Mario Cantone,Scott Foley,Jasmine
Guy,Robert Sean Leonard) 2003;

Birdland – name of three venues
– the first opened 1949 at 1678 Broadway west of 52nd St – Charlie Parker, Dizzy
Gillespie, Count Basie, Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Bud Powell,
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Erroll Garner, and many, many others – attracted its
share of celebrities. Regulars to the nightly festivities included such
household names as Gary Cooper, Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Joe Louis,
Marlene Dietrich, Ava Gardner, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Sugar Ray Robinson – closed
1965 – became Flash Dancers, was originally Ubangi, Ebony and Clicque; 2nd at
2745 Broadway 1980s; 3rd at 315 West 44th Street;

Bitter End – 147 Bleecker Street (between Thompson and LaGuardia)- famous
cabaret/nightclub since 1961 (2011 50th year) – has been home to such talents as Woody Allen,
Peter Allen, Joan Baez, George Carlin, Judy Collins, John Denver, Neil Diamond,
Bob Dylan 1975, Cass Elliot, Everly Brothers, Jose Feliciano, Janis Ian, Billy
Joel, Patti La Belle, Les Paul, Rod McKuen, Bette Midler, Anne Murray, Johnny
Nash, Rick Nelson, Odetta, Peter Paul and Mary, Richard Pryor, Helen Reddy, Joan Rivers, Kenny
Rogers, Linda Ronstadt, Pete Seeger, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Lily Tomlin,
Flip Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young and many famous comics – now The Other
End – metalplaque indicates “Manhattan’s Oldest Surviving Rock Club”

Black Angus – 148 E 50th Street – famous nightclub

Black Bottom Club – Harlem 1930s – Duke Ellington

Black Box Theatre – see Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre

Black Cat – 557 Broadway nightclub – 1930s

Black Horse Tavern – itinerant entertainers

Black Theatre – 3rd – One-Mile Stone on Broadway – Prince & Mercer Sts

Blanchard’s Amphitheatre – see Chatham Theatre

Bleecker Street Cinemas – closed

*Bleeker 45
- 45 Bleeker Street between Broadway & Lafayette St. – one of the
newer off Broadway theatres in the area – doors closed abruptly Oct 12/10 – see also 45 Bleecker Street Theater
Bleecker Street Theater – now known as Culture Project

Blenheim (Bronx) – 1940s – 1,800 seats -Closed, 1940s

*Blue Angel- 152 East 55th
Street – (1943-1964) – cabaret famous in the 1960s – Barbra Streisand
(1961-1963); Charles Pierce; Pearl Bailey; Bobby Short; Eartha Kitt; Yul Brynner;
Carol Burnett; Dorothy Loudon; Mike Nichols and Elaine May; Mildred Bailey (1944
to 1947) 2nd – Blue
Angel Theatre (NYC)
– 323 West 44th St (between 8th & 9th Aves) – Barbara
Cook – early 1980s; Pageant 1991; Swingtime Canteen 1995;

*Blue Heron Arts Centre
- 121 East 24th St. (between Park & Lexington)- see Algonquin Theater
- new arts complex dedicated to theatre – two theatres, 99 seat Kaufman and the
45 seat Parker which will be made available for rental – Blue Heron Theatre will
be new artistic sounding board for the not-for-profit Algonquin Theater
Productions – Founded in 2004, Algonquin Theater Productions presents reading
and showcases of “production ready” works with aim of successful transfers to
Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional production, film and television – company has
acquired the lease of what was formerly the Blue Heron Theatre and renamed it
the Algonquin Theater; they will provide company with a home base for its
endeavors, complete with rehearsal studios and two performances spaces – the
99-seat Kaufman and the 45-seat Parker;

Blue Hill Troupe

Bon Soir – (1949-1967) – 40 West 8th Street between 5th and 6th
Avenues – intimate cabaret of 1960s and 1970s – Barbra Streisand (@18 years)
(1960-1962)was the opening act for Phyllis Diller; Charles Pierce; Kaye Ballard;
Ethel Waters; James Lipton;

Bon Ton Theatre – see Koster and Bial’s Music Hall

Booth’s Theater – 1869 – 23rd and SW corner of 6th Avenue – razed
few years later 1883 and large department store built – Romeo and Juliet with
Edwin Booth 1869; Zip or Point Lynne Light 1874 (21) – demolished 1965; 2nd – >*Booth
– 222 West 45th St. (Shubert-780 seats) – turns 100 Oct 16/13 – opened in 1913 to honour of
great actor Edwin Booth –Great Adventure 1913; Children of Earth 1914;
Experience 1914 (255), Seventh Heaven 1922 (704), Saturday’s Children 1927
(310), Bird in Hand 1929 (500), Grand Street Follies (James Cagney) 1929 (93);
Kind Lady (Grace George) 1935 (102); You Can’t Take It With You (Henry
Travers,Josephine Hull) 1936 (837), Time of Your Life (Pulitzer & NY Drama
Critics Awards – Gene Kelly,Celeste Holm) 1939 (185); Claudia 1941 (722), Two
Mrs. Carrolls 1943 (585), You Touched Me (Tennessee Williams, playwright, with
Montgomery Clift,Edmund Gwenn) 1945 (109); Playboy of the Western World (Maureen
Stapleton,Julie Harris,Burgess Meredith) 1946 (10 weeks); Come Back Little Sheba
1950 (190); Magic and the Loss (Uta Hagen) 1954 (27); Visit to a Small Planet
1957 (388), Two For the Seesaw (Henry Fonda,Anne Bancroft) 1958 (750); Tenth Man
1959 (623), Spoon River Anthology; Butterflies Are Free 1969 (1128), Luv (Alan
Arkin,Eli Wallach,Anne Jackson) 1964 (901), Birthday Party (Henderson
Forsythe,Ruth White) 1967 (4 months); New Faces of 1968, That Championship
Season 1972 (700); Bad Habits 1974 (after run at Astor Theatre); For Coloured
Girls…. (after run at Public Theatre) 1976 (742), Sunday in the Park With
George (Mandy Patinkin,Bernadette Peters) 1984 (540); Tru (Robert Morse) 1989
(295); Shirley Valentine 1989; Old Neighborhood 1997 (197); Elephant Man Philip
Anglim,Carole Shelley,Kevin Conway) 1979 (916), Sunday in the Park With George
(Mandy Patinkin,Bernadette Peters) 1984; I’m Not Rappaport (Judd Hirsch,Cleavon
Little) 1985 (890), All Over Town, Very Good Eddie; Tru 1989 (295); Once on This
Island 1990 (469) – transferred from off-Broadway; Old Neighbourhood (Patti
LuPone) 1997 (197); Evening with Jerry Herman (Lee Roy Reams) 1998; Via Dolorosa
1999; Dame Edna – The Royal Tour 1999 (260); Bea Arthur on Broadway: Just
Between Friends 2002; Retreat From Moscow (John Lithgow,Eileen Atkins)2003
(147); Good Body 2004 (40); Sunday in the Park With George; High 2011;

Bop City – 52nd Street nightclub – 1940s

Boston Museum Theatre – Silver Spoon 1852

Boston Road, Bronx 1,500 seats – Retail

Bottom Line – 15 West 4th
Street – formlery Red Garter – has been presenting live music since 1974 – With the economic downturn
in the NYC area, attendance to shows (i.e. Bruce Springsteen, Miles Davis, Billy Joel, Mick Jagger, Carly Simon, Stevie Wonder, Dolly Parton, Joan Baez, Dizzy Gillespie, Lou Reed, Ramones, Janis Ian et al) has declined
- closed 2004 after almost 30 years as a landmark 400 seat club – now NYU lecture hall

Boulevard, Bronx – 1913 – 1,975 seats – Retail

*Bouwerie Lane
Theatre
- 330 Bowery (Bond & 2nd Sts) – converted bank building – home
to Jean Cocteau Repertory (140)- Dames at Sea (Bernadette Peters) 1968 (575);
DeSade Illustrated 1969 – see also Jean Cocteau Repertory as company disbanded
March 2007 – building sold 2007 and converted into condo residences

Bowery Amphitheatre – 1821 – Zoological Institute at 37-9 Broadway
was adapted as theatre in 1835 – (used for Minstrel shows from 1840s to 1880s) –
remodelled to house equestrian and circus acts – later became Minstrel Hall – in
1844 became Knickerbocker, by 1854 was the Stadt Theatre – Witchcraft or the
Martyrs of Salem 1847 (5), Broker of Bogota 1834 – became Armory 1866 after many
more names – 1879 became Thalia Theatre for its remainder – demolished

Bowery Ballroom – built before Stock Market Crash of 1929 – stood vacant until end of World War II – became high end retail – 1997 converted to music venue – 6 Delancey St – 575 capacity – Joan Baez; Kanye West (10);

Bowery Theatres
– first Bowery Theatre opened 1826 – 46-8 Bowery – opened as New York
Theatre, Bowery with Road to Ruin 1826 – burned down 5 times over 7 years – 1828
theatre burnt down, the second in 1828 and burnt down 1836; the third 1837 and
again destroyed by fire 1838 – reopened 1839 – presented dog dramas (Planter and
His Dogs; Dogs of the Wreck– later act moved to National Theatre and continued
until early 1870s) – burned down 1845 and rebuilt again and closed 1878 –
reopening as the Thalia – destroyed by fire 1923 and again in 1929 but not
rebuilt – for a time was American Theatre, Bowery; 4th – the New Bowery opened
1859 – 1866 destroyed by fire and never rebuilt

Brandy’s Piano
Bar

Bowery Volks Garden

Box – rock club – Christie St

Brandon Fradd Theatre – 161 seats – in
new Whyte Hall at Fire Island Pines Community Center – opening Barbara Cook June
2007

Breakfast Club – West Erie Street, Harlem nightclub – 1920s – was
originally Liberty Inn

Brighton Theatre – (see Bijou Opera House) – 1239 Broadway – between
30th & 31st Sts – later became Bijou – razed 1915 – replaced by office bldg

*Broadhurst
– 235 West 44th (Shubert-1,186 seats) Opened 1917 for playwright
George Broadhurst with Misalliance 1917 – Hold Everything 1928 (413), June Moon
1929 (273), Green Hat (Katharine Cornell) 1925; Beggar on Horseback 1924 (224),
Broadway 1926 (603); Animal Kingdom (Leslie Howard) 1932 (183), High Kickers
1931; Twentieth Century 1932 (152), Men in White 1933 (351), Petrified Forest
(Leslie Howard,Humphrey Bogart,Peggy Conklin) 1935 (197), Victoria Regina (Helen
Hayes) 1935 (517), Happy Birthday 1946 (564); Flahooley (Barbara Cook,Yma Sumac)
1951 (5 weeks); Seventeen (Kenneth Nelson) 1951 (23 weeks); Pal Joey 1952 (540),
Prescott Proposals (Katharine Cornell) 1953 (15 weeks); Anniversary Waltz 1954
(615), Auntie Mame 1956 (639), World of Suzie Wong 1958 (508), Fiorello 1959
(796), Sail Away 1961, Bravo Giovanni 1962; 110 In The Shade 1963; Kelly 1965;
Half a Sixpence 1965 (512), Cabaret (Joel Grey,Lotte Lenya,Jack Gilford,Jill
Haworth) 1966 (original 1165), Little Murders (Barbara Cook,Elliot Gould,Ruth
White) 1967 (7), More Stately Mansions (Colleen Dewhurst,Ingrid Bergman,Arthur
Hill) 1967 (142); Fig Leaves Are Falling 1969; Play It Again Sam 1969 (453), Cry
For Us All 1970; 70 Girls 70 1971; Godspell 1971 (2124 – moved from Cherry
Lane), Sunshine Boys 1972 (538), Sunshine Boys 1972 (538), Godspell 1976 (527);
Dancin’ 1978 (1774), Tribute 1978 (212); Amadeus (Iam McKellen,Tim Curry 1980
(1181), Tap Dance Kid (Savion Glover) 1983 (669), Odd Couple (female version
Rita Moreno,Sally Struthers) 1985 (295); Broadway Bound (Linda Lavin,Phyllis
Newman,Jason Alexander) 1986 (756), Rumors 1988 (531), Texas Trilogy, Only Game
in Town, Sherlock Holmes, Sly Fox, Death and the Maiden (Glenn Close,Richard
Dreyfuss,Gene Hackman) 1992; Kiss of the Spider Woman (Chita Rivera,Brent
Carver,Anthony Crivello) 1993 (906);Once Upon a Mattress (Heath Lamberts,Sarah
Jessica Parker,Jane Krakowski 1996 (187); Judas Kiss (Liam Neeson) 1998 (102);
I’m Telling You for the Last Time (Jerry Seinfeld) 1998; Fosse 1999; Dance of
Death (Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren)2001; Never Gonna Dance 2003 (84); Merchant of Venice (Al Pacino) – 2010; Baby It’s You 2011;

Broadway at Sea

Broadway Boudoir - see Fellows Opera House

Broadway Circus – 1812-14 – then became New Theatre 1813 season
Broadway Comedy Club

Broadway Dance Center - 221 West 57th St – Extell acquired the property,
once home to the Hard Rock Cafe, and an adjacent building in June/05. The
Broadway Dance Center’s lease does not expire until 2012 – studio moved into its
present location in 1998; the site of its old home on Broadway and 55th Street
has been transformed into Random House’s headquarters and luxury condominiums

Broadway Jones Supper Club – 65 W 129th Street – 1920s nightclub

Broadway Music Hall – see Wallack’s Lyceum

Broadway Opera House – see Bijou Theatre

Broadway Theatre
– (7 theatres have used this name ) – 1445 Broadway – Southwest corner at
41st St – originally site of concert hall and Cosmopolitan Skating Rink – opened
as Metropolitan Casino in 1880 and then Broadway – rebuilt 1888, seating 1,781 –
opening show La Tosca 1888; Little Lord Fauntleroy 1888 (4 mos); Edwin Booth &
Helene Modjeska in repertory 1889; Ben Hur (cast of 261with real horses) (nearly
6 months); Utopia Limited;Ugly Duckling (Mrs. Leslie Carter) 1890; Edwin Booth
in Hamlet 1891; El Capitan 1896 (112),Midnight Sons (Vernon Castle) 1909 (8
mos);American Maid (Sousa) 1913; 1913 became a cinema – Broadway Fever 1929
demolished 1929 after trials of film and vaudeville; 2nd Broadway Theatre -
Broadway Theatre (NYC) – see Metropolitan Concert Hall – 326 Broadway – 1847 –
between Pearl & Anthony (Worth) – 3rd – structure to bear this name – 4,500
seats – modelled after London’s Haymarket Theatre opened with School for Scandal
1847 – 1855 theatre collapsed – rebuilt – Francesca da Rimini 1855 (8), Danites,
or the Heart of the Sierras 1877 (30),– closed 1859 – demolished – warehouse
erected on site; 4th Broadway Theatre – 410 Broadway – originally the Euterpean
Hall – renamed Broadway for brief period in 1837; 5th – Broadway Theatre –
Wallack’s Lyceum in last years was called the Broadway; 6th -
Broadway Theatre -
built as the B.F. Moss’s Colony Theatre, a cinema at 1681 Broadway @ 53rd – 1924
- (Shubert-1,765 seats) – became legitimate house in 1930 and name changed to
Broadway 1930 when the old Broadway Theatre on Broadway at 41st was torn down –
opened with New Yorkers (Cole Porter) (Jimmy Durante)(20 weeks) 1930Troilus and
Cressida;Green Pastures 1930; briefly called Earl Carroll’s Broadway for Earl
Carroll’s Vanities (Milton Berle) 1932 (87);O’Flynn 1934 – back to Broadway and
films in 1934 and became legitimate again in 1940 – Too Many Girls 1940 (moved
from Imperial); This is the Army 1942; My Sister Eileen 1942 – moved from
Biltmore; showed films in the 1940s Disney’s Fantasia and Steamboat Willie were
introduced here – Student Prince 1943; Little Johnny Jones 1943 (502), Carmen
Jones 1943 (502); Lady in the Dark (Gertrude Lawrence) 1943 (3 mos); Up in
Central Park 1945 (9 mos) – moved from Century Theatre; Beggars Holiday 1946;
Song of Norway 1946 – moved from Imperial; Flag is Born 1946 – moved from Music
Box; Beggar’s Holiday (Alfred Drake,Avon Long,Zero Mostel) 1946; Cradle Will
Rock (Alfred Drake) 1948 – moved from Mansfield; Pardon Our French (Olsen and
Johnson) 1950 (100); Where’s Charley (moved from St. James); Green Pastures 1951
(44)- for brief time showed Cinerama films 1952 – Diamond Lil 1951; Four Saints
in Three Acts 1952; Shuffle Along 1952; South Pacific – moved from Majestic;
Saint of Bleecker Street 1954 (92); Mr. Wonderful (Sammy Davis Jr.,Chita Rivera)
1956 (383); Shinbone Alley (Eartha Kitt,Eddie Bracken) 1957 (49); Most Happy
Fella – transferred from Imperial (3 mos); Body Beautiful 1958; Gypsy (Ethel
Merman) 1959 (702); Kean (Alfred Drake) 1961 (92); Tovarich (Vivian Leigh,Jean-Pierre
Aumont) 1963 (264); Girl Who Came to Supper (Florence Henderson,Jose
Ferrer,Tessie O’Shea) 1963;Baker Street (Fritz Weaver,Martin Gabel,Inga Swenson)
1965 (9 mos); Devils (Jason Robards Jr.,Anne Bancroft) 1966; Time For Singing
1966; Annie Get Your Gun (Ethel Merman) – from Lincoln Center 1966; Funny Girl -
transferred from Winter Garden; Happy Time (Robert Goulet,David Wayne) 1968
(286), Cabaret and Mame moved to finish their runs 1968/69; Purlie (Cleavon
Little,Melba Moore) 1970 (690); Fiddler on the Roof – 1972 – moved here; Dude
1972; house was gutted and renovated for Harold Prince’s revival of Candide -
moved from Chelsea Theatre (1974) (740); Guys and Dolls 1976-77; Wiz -
transferred from Majestic; Sarava 1979 – transferred from Mark Hellinger; Evita
(Patti LuPone,Mandy Patinkin) 1979 (1,567), Zorba (Anthony Quinn,Lila Kedrova);
King and I (revival Yul Brynner) 1984; Three Musketeers 1984; Big Deal (Fosse)
1986 (62); Les Miserables 1987 – moved to Imperial; Miss Saigon (Jonathan
Pryce,Lea Salonga,Hinton Battle)1991; Guys and Dolls 1992 (revival 1144 -
original 1200); La Boheme (Baz Luhrmann) 2002 (228); Bombay Dreams 2004 (284); Sister Act 2011;
7th – Broadway – Daly’s Theatre at 1221 Broadway in 1877-8 was called the
Broadway Broadway 1888 -1,700 seats – Razed, 1930
Bronx Opera House – built mid 1913 – to reopen as Bronx Opera House Hotel mid 2013 – beaux arts building has undergone many transformations – now owned by Empire Hotel Group – 436 East 149th street – one of several theaters to come into the area that became known as the Hub – seated 1,900 on three levels and in box seats – Performers included Will Rogers in 1914, the Marx Brothers, George Burns, Gracie Allen, Julia Marlowe, Ethel Barrymore and Lionel Barrymore, David Warfield, George M. Cohan, Eddie Cantor, John Bunny, Harry Houdini, and Peggy Wood – Post-Broadway shows were often performed and the theater hosted the Aborn Opera Company – in 1940s converted to a late-run movie house, shuttering of the upper balcony reduced seating to 1,400, and it became known simply as Bronx Theatre – theatre lost its license 1943 after the rape of a 17-year-old worker – theatre flourished during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s as a Latin music dance club operating as Bronx Casino, Club Caravana and El Cerromar – In the 1980s it was purchased by a pentecostal church

Brooklyn Academy of Music – see BAM

*Brooklyn Center for the
Performing Arts
– Walt Whitman Theatre – campus of Brooklyn College -
2900 Campus Road & Hillel Place

Brooklyn Lyceum/Gowanus.com – 227 4th
Avenue at President St – Park Slope – used to be old bathhouse – 1909 -
converted into two theatres

Brooklyn Paramount – Flatbush Avenue Extension and DeKalb Avenue -
4,100 – opened in 1928 – used for rock and roll concerts in the 1950s – has been
converted to a gym in 1963

Brooklyn Theatre – Brooklyn – 1871 – burnt down in fire 1876 – – 300
lives lost
Polonsky Shakespeare Center – new home for Theatre for New Audience opening Fall, 2013 – 27,500-sqaure-foot theater is the first major house for classical work built in New York since Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater opened in 1965, according to theater and city officials. Mr. Horowitz founded Theater for a New Audience in 1979 to presents the work of Shakespeare and other classic and contemporary playwrights – Polonsky Center is its first permanent home.

*Brooks
Atkinson
– 256 West 47th St. (Nederlander-seats 1.069) – opened as
Mansfield in 1926 – renamed in 1960 in honour of the N.Y. Times drama critic –
Night Duel 1926; Ladder 1926 (794), Dybbuk 1927; Green Pastures 1930 (640), Anna
Lucasta 1944 (957), 1946 used for radio and tv until 1960 reopened as Brooks
Atkinson – Come Blow Your Horn 1961 (677), Lenny (Cliff Gorman) 1972; Lolita;
River Niger (NEC) 1973 (280), Same Time Next Year 1975 (1453), Same Time Next
Year 1975 (1453), Tribute (Jack Lemmon) 1978 (212); Talley’s Folly 1980 (277),
Noises Off (Dorothy Loudon,Brian Murray,Victor Garber) 1983 (553), Edmund Kean
(Ben Kingsley) 1983; Day in the Death of Joe Egg, Night Life, Wally’s Café;
Buried Child 1996; Play On (Andre DeShields)1997; Wait Until Dark (Quentin
Tarantino,Marisa Tomei) 1998 (97); Fool Moon 1998; Iceman Cometh (Kevin Spacey)
1999 (91); Uncle Vanya (Derek Jacobi,Laura Linney) 1999; Noises Off (Patti
LuPone,Peter Gallagher) 2001;Grease (revival)2007; Rain 2011;

Brothers and Sisters – West 46th Street – intimate club of the 1970s
in the theatre district i.e. first saw the legendary Barbara Cook 1974 in her
new cabaret career, Julie Wilson, Sylvia Syms, Marcia Lewis – torn down late
seventies

Brougham’s Lyceum Theatre – (see Wallack’s) – 1850 – Broadway and
Broome Streets – see Fifth Avenue Theatre/Opera House
Bruno Walter Auditorium – see Lincoln Center and New York Pubic Library for the Performing Arts

Bryant’s Opera House – see Tony Pastor’s, Koster and Bial’s Music
Hall – 1870 – N side of 23rd St – W of 6th Ave

Bryant Theatre – see Apollo Theatre

B.S. Moss’s Colony – see Broadway Theatre

Buckley’s Hall - Broadway below Houston St – 1856 – 585 Broadway –
opposite Niblo’s Garden and Metropolitan Hotel – minstels then variety; then
German & French language house – became Tony Pastor’s (1875 to 1881)

Buckley’s Minstrel Hall – later became Barnum’s New American Museum, known
as Chinese Rooms before Buckley – burned 1868

Buckley’s Olympic Theatre/Opera House – see Olympic Theatre and
Chinese Rooms

Bullet Space – 292 East 3rd Street

Bull’s Head Inn – see New York Theatre

Burnside, Bronx 2,178 seats – now Pharmacy

Burton’s Chambers Street Theatre – see Palmo’s Opera House – Toodles
1848

Burton’s New Theatre – see Tripler Hall – Broadway opposite Bond
Street – Uncle Tom’s Cabin 1858; Richard III (Barry Sullivan)

Burton’s Theatre – 1848 – formerly Palmo’s Opera House built in 1844

Bushes – intimate club on the west side of Central Park (in 70s) -
Joe Masiell 1980s

Butler’s American Theatre – see Mechanics Hall

C

Cabaret 1050

Cabaret Rheinland

(Cadillac) Winter Garden Theatre – see the 91 year old (2002) Winter
Garden Theatre – reverted to Winter Garden as of Jan 1/07

*Café Carlyle
(Bemelmans Bar)(Carlysle Hotel)- Madison Avenue at 76th Street – 100 seat
dining/cabaret room – Bobby Short debut in 1968 (ending 37 year run as of New
Year’s Eve 2005) – This fall the landmark Cafe Carlyle, which has played host to
such legendary talents as Bobby Short, Woody Allen, Elaine Stritch, Eartha Kitt
and Judy Collins will unveil a new look for its grand reopening on September
18/07 with the legendary Eartha Kitt, who opens the fall season with an
engagement through October 27 (celebrating her 80th birthday year)

Cafe Cino – see Caffe Cino

Café de Paree – nightclub managed by Billy Rose

Café des Beaux Arts – 6th and West 46th St – 1895

Café Esplanade – 1930s nightclub

Café La Mama – see La Mama Experimental Theatre Club

Café Martin – 1890s

Cafe Pierre

Café Review – early 1900s

Cafe Royal - see Yiddish Theatre

Cafe Society Club – intimate cabaret – Sheridan Square – Billie
Holliday – 1940s

Café Wha? – 115 MacDougal St – Bob Dylan 1961

Caffe Cino
– New York’s first “Off-Broadway” theatre in 1958 – 31 Cornelia Street –
1958 – regarded as the beginning of off-off Broadway – gay playwright Doric Wilson (1939-2011) and Living Theatre;

Cain’s Warehouse – late 1880s – specialized in storing theatrical scenery
for closed Broadway shows – closed 1938

Cake Shop – rock club – Ludlow St

Camelot Twin Cinemas - closed

Cameo Theatre – art house – open

Camera Theatre

Campus – 104th Street 1930s nightclub

Canal Room – 285 West Broadway at Canal Street – 2013 is 10th anniversary

Canal Theatre – 1927 – closed

Candler Theatre – 226 West 42nd St – see Sam H. Harris Theatre,
Harris – 1914 – opened as a movie house with Anthony and Cleopatra, but soon
became legitimate house – (1,200 seats) – On Trial 1914 (365); in 1916 name
changed to Cohan and Harris – A Tailor Made Man 1917 (300+); Three Faces East
(300+); Tavern 1920 (252); Welcome Stranger 1920 (300+) and in 1921 changed to
Sam. H. Harris Theatre – Hamlet (John Barrymore) 1922 (101); Love ‘Em and Leave
‘Em; We Americans (Paul Muni); Mendel, Inc; Last Mile (Spencer Tracy); Rhapsody
in Black (Ethel Waters); Pigeons and People (George M. Cohan) 1933 (2 mos) – by
1933 became a movie house for 55 years – redevelopment Harris will be joined
with the Empire and Liberty Theatres to form part of the AMC movie complex and
Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum

Capitol Theatre – 1645 Broadway at 51st – Times Square – built in
1919 by Thomas W. Lamb (5,230 seats) – world’s largest theatre when it opened –
4,820 seats – Aimee Semple McPherson – converted to Cinerama 1962 and renamed
Loew’s Cinerama – 1972 two theatres added – Uris – 2000 seats – Circle in the
Square 1983 – Uris renamed George Gershwin

Capri Cinema - closed & demolished

*Cap 21 -
15 West 28th St (between 5th & 6th Aves)

Caribe Theatre - closed & demolished

Carlton Theatre (Riverview) – 1913 – 1,042 seats – Razed, 200? &
demolished

Carmine Theatre – closed

*Carnegie Hall -
154 West 57th St at 7th Avenue – 1881 – 2,835 seats 1882 – Remodelled in 1986 -
Barbara Cook 1975; Bette Midler; Chavela Vargas 1981; Lights On 1986 (benefit
concert)- Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall opening in Sept 2003 (644 seats), formerly
the site of the Carnegie Cinema, making 3 halls, main Isaac Stern Auditorium
(2,804 seats), Weill Recital Hall (268 seats) – in the future to be once again
the home of the New York Philharmonic

Carnegie Hall Cinema – closed

Carnival Club – 1940s nightclub

Caroline’s Comedy Club – 1626 Broadway

Carousel – 52nd Street – 1940s

Carrere and Hastings – noted architectural firm – New York Public Library;
Frick Mansion; Abbey Theatre (later Knickerbocker); New (later Century); Globe
(later Lunt-Fontanne)

Carter Theatre– Ka-boom! 1980

Caruso Cinema – see Edyth Totten Theatre

Casa Cugat – 1940s nightclub

Casa Manana – 50th & 7th Ave – 1930s – Billy Rose managed – see Earl
Carroll Theatre

Casanova Roof – 134 West 52nd St – 1920s nightclub

Casino de Paris – see Earl Carroll Theatre – Billy Rose, Fanny Brice; 2nd
Casino de Paris – see New Theatre; 3rd – see Gallo Opera House, Studio 54

Casino Theatre
-(1882-1930)– Southeast corner of Broadway and 39th Streets (1300 seats)-
best example of Moorish architecture in the country – atmospheric style – opened
with Queen’s Lace Handkerchief (Strauss operetta) 1882 – first to be entirely
lit by electricity, and the first to feature a chorus line–the Floradora Girls,
who included Evelyn Nesbit, over whom Harry K. Thaw murdered Stanford White -
first theatre to have shows on its roof –stood until 1930 when it and
Knickerbocker gave way to expanding garment district – next door to Henry
Abbey’s Theatre (804seats) – in 1882 the first roof garden opened atop the
theatre – old Metropolitan Opera House later erected on Northwest corner)first
legitimate theatre designed exclusively for the performance of musicals – Ermine
(571); Passing Show 1894; In Gay New York 1898 – see Earl Carroll Theatre -
Belle of New York 1897 (56), Passing Show of 1894; Origin of the Cake Walk or
Clorindy 1898; Floradora 1900 (553); Runaways 1903 (21 weeks) – after fire in
1903 reopened in 1905 with 1,300 seats – The Earl and the Girl (Eddie Foy) 1905;
Sally, Irene and Mary; Faust (American Opera Company); Chinese Honeymoon 1923;
I’ll Say She Is (Marx Brothers) 1924; Vagabond King 1925 (511); Desert Song 1926
(465), razed 1930; 2nd – was Continental before becoming Earl Carroll Theatre
was renamed Casino from 1932-1934



*Castillo Theatre – 500
Greenwich St., 2nd Floor (between Spring and Canal Streets) – multicultural arts
centre (72)

Castle Garden/Castle
Garden Theatre
– Between 1808 and 1811 a fort was constructed on the
rocks off tip of Manhattan Island named “The Southwest Battery,” it was renamed
Castle Clinton in 1817 – army vacated the fort in 1821 and structure was deeded
to New York City in 1823. In 1824, a new restaurant and entertainment center
opened at the site, now called Castle Garden – roof was added in 1847 and Castle
Garden served as an opera house and theater until 1854 (Sept. 11,1850 – lst
appearance of Jenny Lind 1850 – organized by P.T. Barnum); 1855 to 1891, Castle
Garden, leased to New York State, opened as an immigrant landing depot. – closed
on April 18, 1890. On April 19, 1890 a temporary center was set up in the old
Barge Office near the Customhouse on the southeast foot of Manhattan and used
until January 1, 1892 when Ellis Island opened – altered once again and reopened
as the New York City Aquarium on December 10, 1896 – one of the city’s most
popular attractions until it closed in 1941. It was reopened later as Castle
Clinton National Monument

Catagonia Club – Harlem nightspot – Bill Bojangles Robinson; Ethel
Waters
Catch – leading NY club of the 1970s – closed
Catch a Rising Star

Caterinas - 316 E 53rd Street – cabaret piano lounge venue opening July
2004

CBGB’s – Punk Venue – opened 1973 – Closing After 33 Years – Oct/06 -
Ramones, Blondie, the Talking Heads, Patti Smith – capacity of barely 300 people

CB’s - rock club – 1970s

CBS Radio Playhouse No 2 – see Klaw Theatre

CBS Radio Theatre – see Royale Theatre

CBS Studio 52 – see Studio 54

Cedar Street Tavern – 24 University Place at 8th Street – Bob Dylan, Allen
Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac – now women’s clothing store

Celebrity Club – 1940s nightclub

Centerfold Theatre – 263 West 86th St. (75)

*Center Stage NY
– 48 West 21st, 4th floor (5th & 6th)- 74 seats – In Arabia We’d All
Be Kings 1999 (Labyrinth Theatre Co); Jesus Hopped the A Train 2000

Center Theatre – 6th Avenue and 48th St – also named RKO Roxy –
opened 1932 as motion picture house RKO Roxy – spectacles on stage, later became
Center Theatre – 1934 became legitimate house, 3000+ seats – Great Waltz (300+
perf); 1934-40 mostly dark – American Way (200 perf); Swingin’ the Dream (Louis
Armstrong,Moms Mabley,Louis Armstrong) 1939; 1940 began ice shows – Stars on Ice
1942 (830), Hats Off to Ice 1944 (889); San Carlo Opera – 1950 converted to NBC
studios – demolished 1955 2nd -
Center Theatre

Central Theatre – 1918 – 1567 Broadway at 47th Street – across from
the legendary Palace Theatre – 1,100 seats – opened with Forever After (Conrad
Nagel and Alice Brady) 1918 (312); Always You 1918 (66); Poor Little Ritz Girl
1920 (119) (Rodgers & Hart); – leased to Universal in 1921 – Melody Man 1924
(Rodgers & Hart); As You Were; Solid Ivory; Connie’s Inn Revue 1932; Minsky’s
Burlesque 1932; in 1934 renamed Columbia for burlesque but went back to old name
quickly – in 1944 name was changed to Gotham and remained movie theatre for 7
years – 1951 theatre renovated and reopened as Holiday – A Night in Havana 1952;
Deadfall 1955 (Joanne Dru and John Ireland) – but by 1957 it was back to
striptease and then to movie house under names Odeon, the Forum, the Forum 47th
Street, and Movieland – it was sold in 1989 and became a disco, Club USA1992 and
the lobby a Roxy Deli – vacant since 1997 – demolished 1999

Central Park – see Delacorte Theatre, Jolson’s 59th
*Century Center
for the Performing Arts
– 111 East 15th Street (Union Square) – opened
March 1997 (299 seats)- White Chocolate 2004 – closed

Century Theatre
- 46th Street in Century Paramount Hotel – (299 seats) – Follow the Girls
1944 (882); High Button Shoes 1947 (727); American Dance Machine, Boccaccio;
Exact Center of the Universe (Frances Sternhagen,Reed Birney) 1999 (142)

Century Grove Theatre – see Century Theatre

Century Roof – see New Theatre

Century Theatre – (see Jolson’s) – Central Park and 62nd Street –
1909 – opened as New Theatre with Antony and Cleopatra 1909 – reopened as
Century in 1911 – closed 1929 and demolished 1930 – on roof was small theatre,
Cocoanut Grive/Century; 2nd Century – 932 7th Avenue between 58th & 59th –
opened as Jolson Theatre in 1921 – from 1934-37 known as the Venice – renamed
Century in 1944 – Inside USA 1948 – demolished 1961

Chaloner (Town) – 1922 – 1,568 seats – Razed, 2002

Chambers Street Theatre – 39-41 Chambers St – opened 1844 as Palmo’s
Opera House on site of Steppani’s Arcade Baths – 1848 became Burton’s Chamber
Street Theatre – for season 1857 called the American Theatre – closed 1857

Chanfrau’s New National Theatre – see Chatham Theatre

Chanin’s 46th Street Theatre – see 46th Street Theatre, Richard
Rodgers Theatre – 226 W 46th St – 1924 – Greenwich Village Follies 1924 – 1,500
seats – 1926 became 46th Street Theatre, but back to original after French play
– 1990 renamed Richard Rodgers – On Your Toes 1954; Do I Hear a Waltz 1965;
Hellzapoppin; Guys and Dolls; How to Succeed in Business; 1776; Counsellor-at-Law;
Junior Miss; Dark of the Moon; Fences; Lost in Yonkers; Seussical (00)

Chapel Street Theatre – Chapel Street (later Beekman) (1761-1766) –
Hamlet 1761

Chapman’s Temple of the Muses – a floating theatre opened in 1845

Charles Hopkins Theatre – 153 West 49th St , E of 7th Ave – 1914 –
300 seats – Marriage of Columbine 1914 – opened as Punch & Judy Theatre – Devil
in the Cheese (Bela Lugosi) 1926; Clever Ones; Treasure Island (250 perf) – 1926
became Charles Hopkins – 1934 became film house as Westminster – 1960s & 1970s
showed porno – 1982 became Embassy World – 1987 demolished and became part of
Rockefeller Center

Charles Theatre – closed

Charley’s – intimate dining establishment – see Sam’s

Charley White’s Opera House – transformed from Washington Hall 1860

Chashama Theatre -
111 – 135 West 42nd Street – ceased operations March, 2004 in preparation for
demolition of the block – organization plans to move further east to 201 E. 42nd
Street – will operate a performance space at 217 on the same block

Chateau Madrid – 231 West 54 Street – 1920s nightclub

Chateau Moderne – 42 E 50th Street – featured all-girl band – 1930s
nightclub

Chatham Garden Theatre – 1823 – white canvas tent – N side of Chatham
St between Pearl and Duane – permanent theatre built 1824 – 1829 became American
Opera House – then Blanchard’s Amphi-theatre – 1932 concerted to Presbyterian
chapel – later a hotel

Chatham Theatre – see Purdy’s New National – referred to as the New
Chatham Theatre – between Duane and Pearl Streets – originally opened as the
Pavilion in 1823 – 1300 seats – 1829 renamed American Opera House – closed 1832
and became Presbyterian Chapel; 2nd Chatham Theatre – New Chatham – SE side of
Chatham Street between Roosevelt & James – 1839 – 2200 seats – 1848 renamed New
National Theatre, also known as Purdy’s National – Uncle Tom’s Cabin – 1852 -
damaged by fire 1860 but continued use as Union Theatre, the National Concert
Hall, and again as the Chatham – finally became National Music Hall and
demolished in 1862

Cheetah – 53rd and Broadway – opened 1966 and closed 1970s – birthplace of salsa music – Fania All-Star concert Aug 26,1971; Hair first presented here; 2nd Cheetah at 12 West St (between 5th and 6th)

Cheetah – Broadway & 53rd Street – widely regarded as the city’s first
super-sized, multi-media mega-club Cheetah held two thousand people – - Its
previous incarnation was as Arcadia Ballroom, a jazz and dancing establishment
which had played host to the likes of Ray Miller, Roy Eldridge, Larry Fotine,
Benny Carter, Sonny James, and Les Brown. (The Arcadia itself had been remodeled
in 1924 from a prior ballroom called the Blue Bird.) I’m not sure when the
Arcadia closed, but the Cheetah took its place in April, 1966 – held two
thousand people – The Squires played there in 1966, featuring Curtis Knight and
pre-fame Jimi Hendrix; Velvet Underground and Tiny Tim played the Cheetah on
April 11, 1967 – Between its Public Theater debut and its long Broadway run at
the Biltmore Theater, HAIR had an engagement at the Cheetah from December 22,
1967 through January 28, 1968 – I’m not absolutely sure when it closed down.
I’ve come across numerous references to a Cheetah in midtown Manhattan that
specialized in boogaloo and salsa music in the early ’70s–but I haven’t been
able to ascertain whether that was an evolution in the B’way & 53rd Cheetah or a
different club altogether – not sure which corner at 53rd the Cheetah was on,
nor what stands in its place today



Chelsea Cinemas - open

Chelsea Hotel – West 23rd Street – closed to guests as of July 31/11 and future is uncertain

*Chelsea
Playhouse
– 125 West 22nd St. (6th & 7th)- Lark Theatre Company &
Gilgamesh Theatre Co. (72)- Contractor (Reid Shelton) 1973 (72); Diamond Studs,
Tuscaloosa’s Calling Me, Vanities

Chelsea Theatre Centre – founded 1965 in Chelsea area but in 1968
moved to Brooklyn Academy of Music – Total Eclipse 1974 (4 weeks)

Chelsea West Cinemas – open

Chelsea Westside Theatre – Vanities (1785)

Chernuchin Theatre – see American Theatre of Actors

*Cherry Lane
Theatre
– 38 Commerce St. (Bedford & Hudson Street) (178 seats, 60 seat Studio Theatre) – extensive
renovation – reopening 2008 – Cherry Lane Theatre – at 80 years old New York’s
longest, continuously-running Off-Broadway theatre – street was once a rural
path lined by the cherry trees of the Gomez farm – early 19th century silo – building erected 1836 as brewery,
later tobacco warehouse, and then
box factory- convered to theatre in 1924 – opened with Saturday Night – productions by F.
Scott Fitzgerald and John Dos Passos in the 1920s – 1927 became New Playwright’s
Theatre – reverted to Cherry Lane in 1928 – did works by Gertrude Stein, Odets
and O’Casey in 1940s – was home to Living Theatre Company before opening their
theatre in 1951 – theatre renovated – Endgame 1957; Boyfriend 1958 (763);
Smiling the Boy Fell Dead 1961; Happy Days 1961; Albee’s The American Dream and
Richardson’s Gallow Humor; Duck Variations and Sexual Perversity in Chicago;
Pinter Plays 1962 (578); Jones’ Dutchman 1964; works by Lanford Wilson and Sam
Shepherd 1965; In Circles 1968; Godspell 1971 – moved to Promenade and on to
Broadway in 1976 (2124); Passion of Dracula 1977 (714); To Bury a Cousin 1980;
True West (Gary Sinese,John Malkovich) 1982 (762); Nunsense 1985 (3672); Closer
Than Ever 1989; Taffetas 1989; Sum of Us 1990 (355); Inside Out 1994; Beautiful
Thing 1998; 2009 90 seat black box venue the Cherry Pit becomes it’s 3rd stage -
opens with Jailbait March 25/09 – not being sold, to reopen 2012 – featured an equally illustrious group of actors and directors, including John Malkovich, Barbra Streisand, Geraldine Fitzgerald, James Earl Jones, Tony Curtis, Ruby Dee, Gene Hackman, Bea Arthur (making her stage debut), Fritz Weaver, Judith Malina, Burl Ives, Colleen Dewhurst, Harvey Keitel, Cicely Tyson, Jerry Stiller, James Coco, Dolores Sutton, Shami Chaikin, James Broderick, Lee Strasberg, Roger Bart, Francot Tone, Roscoe Lee Browne, Alan Schneider, Claudia Shear, Anne Revere, Theodore Bikel, Peter Falk, Estelle Parsons, Judd Hirsch, Judith Ivey, Robert Wilson, Maxwell Caulfield, Adolf Green and Betty Comden, Alvin Epstein, Rue McClanahan, Shirley Knight, John Tillinger, Lewis Black, Sudie Bond, Tom Bosley (who also worked in the theatre’s box office), Frances Sternhagen, Roy Scheider, James Noble, Geraldine Page, Mark Setlock, Gene Saks, Bob Dylan, F. Murray Abraham, Kiki & Herb, Jo Ann Worley, Joan Micklin Silver, John Rando, Gary Sinise, Vincent Gardenia, Micki Grant, Tony Musante, Rainn Wilson, Kevin Bacon, Kim Stanley, Frank Langella, Tyne Daly, John Epperson, Nancy Marchand, Robert Loggia, Dennis Quaid, Joan Cusack and Joseph Chaikin.”

Cherry Pit - see Cherry Lane Theatre

*Chez Suzette - 675 B
Ninth Avenue, NYC – Closing 2004 – this restaurant/jazz club at one time was
located in the space occupied by the recently closed FIREBIRD CAFE on West 46th
Street

Chicago City Limits Theatre
- new home 2004 at the New York Improv – 318 West 53rd Street – New York’s
longest-running comedy revue, had to close its doors Nov. 2/03, after 8,500
performances, the improvisational comedy troupe will end its 23-year run. The
company’s current show, America Idles, opened in June/04 – given repreive to at
least Dec 31/03

Chickering Hall - 5th Avenue and 18th St (1,247 seats) – demolished

Childs Spanish Theater/Garden – 1940s nightclub

Chinese Rooms – see Barnum’s New American Museum – 539 Broadway –
Buckley’s Serenaders 1853 – became Buckley’s Opera House – closed 1862 –
reopened 1865 when P.T. Barnum moved after American Museum destroyed by fire
Chocolat – Harlem jazz venue

Christian C. Yegan Theatre – Springtime for Henry (Roundabout)(Tovah
Feldshuh)1985;

Christy & Wood’s Music Hall – in City Assembly Rooms – also incorporated
Coliseum – NY’s most famous mistrel bldg

Christy’s Minstrels – Broadway & Grand St

Church of Saint Paul and Saint Andrew – 263 West 86th Street

Church of the Heavenly Rest– 2 East 90th Street

Cine 42 – closed

Cinema Dante – see Princess Theatre

Cinema 49 – see 49th Street Theatre

Cinema I & II – 1001 3rd Avenue – 1962 to present

Cinema Verdi – see Princess Theatre

Cinema Village – open

* Circle in the
Square – Uptown
- 650 seats – see Capitol Theatre, Henry Miller’s – 1633 Broadway @
50th St. – (founded 1951 under direction of Jose Quintero in association with
Theodore Mann – opened uptown in 1972 with Mourning Becomes Electra (Colleen
Dewhurst,Pamela Payton-Wright) (53)) – celebrated 45th anniversary under threat
of bankruptcy – Iceman Cometh 1956 revival (565), Uncle Vanya (Lillian
Gish,George C.Scott,Nicol Williamson,Julie Christie,Cathleen Nesbitt,Barnard
Hughes,Conrad Bain,Elizabeth Wilson) 1973; Loose Ends 1979 (284), Ah Wilderness,
Balcony, Club, Coastal Disturbances; Glass Menagerie, Hot L Baltimore 1973
(1166), Lady From the Sea, Loose Ends, Night of the Iguana, Once in a Lifetime,
Pal Joey; Death of a Salesman (George C.Scott,Teresa Wright,Harvey Keitel,James
Farentino) 1975;Marriage of Figaro (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio,Christopher
Reeve,Dana Ivey) 1986 (77); Caretaker 1986 (45); Oil City Symphony 1987; Getting
Married 1991 (70); Hughie 1996 (56) with Al Pacino; Not About Nightingales (1999
the theatre reopened with this play after bankruptcy); Getting Married 1991
(70); Hughie (Al Pacino) 1996 (65); Tartuffe:Born Again (John Glover) 1996;
Salome and Chinese Coffee (Al Pacino) 1999; Rocky Horror Show 2000 (437);
Metamorphoses 2002; Lombardi 2011; 2nd – Circle in the Square-Downtown (NYC) – 5 Sheridan
Square 1951 – 1954 building closed as fire hazard – 1960 building demolished and
company moved to former New Stages Theatre at 159 Bleecker St @ Thompson St. -
started as a movie theatre (299)- winner of Regional Theatre Tony Award 1976 –
opened with Dark of the Moon 1951; Iceman Cometh 1956 (565); Quare Fellow 1958
(126); Balcony 1960 (672); Trojan Women 1963 (600); Eh (Dustin Hoffman) 1966
(232); 1972 moved uptown to 1633 Broadway in basement of Uris Theatre (650
seats); Trojan Women (600), Club 1976 (674), Greater Tuna 1982 (501), Oil City
Symphony 1987 (626) – closed

Circle in the Square Theatre
School

*Circle
Repertory Company
– 99 Seventh Ave. S. – formed in loft at Broadway
and 83rd St 1969– company moved in 1974 to former Sheridan Square Playhouse
which became Circle Repertory Company Theatre – 100-150 seats – Three Sisters
1969; Gemini 1977 (1778 with move to Broadway), Fifth of July (William Hurt)
1978 (158) moved to Broadway (511), Angels Fall, 5th of July, Glorious Morning,
Harvesting, Tale Told, Talley’s Folly, Tribute to Lily Lamont, Ulysses in
Traction, Fool For Love (Ed Harris) 1983 (1,000); Balm in Gilead (Gary Sinise)
1984; Prelude to a Kiss (Alec Baldwin,Mary-Louise Parker – transferred to Helen
Hayes with Timothy Hutton 1990; – closed in 1996 after 28 years of great theatre
featuring the plays of Albert Innaurato, Edward Moore and Lanford Wilson -
During its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s, Circle Rep sent several plays to
Broadway, including Wilson’s The Hot l Baltimore, Talley’s Folly, 5th of July
and Angels Fall, Knock Knock, Gemini, and As Is by Hoffman

Circle Theatre – 1825 Broadway at 60th Street – 1900 – 1671 seats -
reopened 1902 with Herbert Stock Company’s Aristrocracy – 1906 remodelled by
Thomas Lamb – Wine,Women and Song ran one and a half years; The Merry-Go-Round
1908; School Days (4 weeks); Queen of the Moulin Rouge (5 mos); In Hayti 1909 (7
weeks) – after 1908 became vaudeville, then movie theatre – 1935 a bomb damaged
parts of the theatre – sold at auction – interior demolished 1939 – torn down to
make way for the Convention Centre in 1954

Circle East – Founded in 2000, Circle East boasts a group of associated
artists more than three hundred strong – many of them were members of the
defunct Circle Repertory Company, a major force in the creation of new American
plays for more than thirty years – Circle East has produced, among others,
Mother Bird and Barbara Bush Never Slept Here

Circus Amphitheatre – 1797 – company from Philadelphia

Circus Cinema – closed & demolished

Circus in America – early 18th Century – heyday last 3 decades of 19th
Century – P.T. Barnum; Barnum and Bailey; Adam Forepaugh Circus; Great Wallace
Circus; Lemen Brothers Circus; Ringling Brothers Circus; Sells Brothers Circus;
b7 1903 approximately 100 circuses were touring the country – frontrunner the
amalgamated, Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Circus

Ciro’s – famous nightclub with world famous Ciro’s Girls

Cirque du Soleil - looks to upgrade from Randall’s Island to downtown
Gotham. Sources close to the org’s newest, biggest project said the
Canadian-based troupe has plans to build a permanent structure in the area of
the South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan

*City Center/City Center Stage 1/City
Center Stage 2
– 131 West 55th St. (between 6th and 7th Avenues) -
built in 1923 as Masonic Temple (2935 seats) with its unique Moorish facade -
was slated for demolition in 1943 but saved by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and
opened as New York City Center of Music and Drama in 1943 with New York
Philharmonic and later Susan and God starring Gertrude Lawrence – both New York
City Opera and the New York City Ballet had their beginnings here until they
moved to Lincoln Centre – home to dozens of musical revivals – in the early
1970s it was slated for demolition once again but was instead given landmark
status – Festival 1979 – also now home to the Manhattan Theatre Club – former
home to Ancient and Accepted Order of the Mystic Shrine, Carousel (revival)
(Barbara Cook,Jo Sullivan) 1954; Brigadoon (revival) (Peter Palmer) 1962; Music
Man (Dick Van Dyke) 1980 (21); Extra Man (Manhattan Theatre Club) (Adam Arkin)
1992; Wonderful Town 2000 revival (City Centre Encores) (2000), My Favorite
Broadway (with Julie Andrews 2000); Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (City Centre Encores)(Megan Hilty/Rachel York) 2012;

City Cinemas East 86th St. Cinemas – open

City College of New York

City Hall Theatre – closed

City Hotel – 1796 – 115 Broadway – near Trinity Church – scene of
concerts, etc.

City Photoplays - 1910 – 2,267 seats -Razed

City Saloon – see City Theatre

City Theatre – 15 Warren St (Broadway & Murray Sts) – 1822 –
outbreak of yellow fever closed theatre 1823 – Merchant of Venice with Edmund
Kean 1831; 2nd City Theatre – upper part of City Saloon on Broadway between
Fulton and Ann Streets – 1837 – opened with Turnpike Gate 1837 – closed same
year; 3rd City Theatre – 116 East 14th Street – 1910 – 1855 seats – opened with
Miss Innocence 1910 – converted to vaudeville house and then Yiddish Art Theatre
1928 – to cinema 1929 – demolished 1952

City Winery – an elegant but cozy new performance space opened Jan 2009 by
Michael Dorf, who founded the Knitting Factory (He left the company in 2003) -
on Varick Street in the South Village, is the Knitting Factory’s opposite.
Instead of a warren of cramped, dank rooms, it is a spacious 21,000 square feet
with table seating for 350 and walls of wood and exposed brick – opening-night
entertainment was Joan Osborne – upcoming shows include Boz Scaggs, Steve Earle
and Philip Glass
Claire Tow Theater – see LCT3 Theatre
Clark Studio Theater – see Lincoln Center

* Classic Stage
Co
– 136 East 13th St. (between 3rd Ave & 4th Ave) (175)

Civic Repertory Theater – 105 West 14th St – opened 1926 – opened
1866 as Theatre Francaise – was old 14th Street Theater – built 1866 (1100
seats) – changed to Civic Repertory in 1926 – in 1932 became the Labor Theatre -
Alison’s House 1930 (41)- closed 1935 – demolished

Civilians – off broadway group – 2010 – one of first off broadway houses to form subscription series with 3 other theatre groups, Exchange, Talking Band, and Rude Mechs

Claire Shulman Playhouse – see Queens Theatre in the Park
Claire Tow Theatre – see also Lincoln Center – opening June 4/12 with Slowgirl – built on top of Vivian Beaumont Theatre – home of LCT3 – 131 seats

Clam House
– 133rd Street between Lennox and 7th Aves – Gladys Bentley

Clam House – 133rd Street – Gladys Bentley

Claremont Theatre – closed

Clark Center for the Performing Arts – see Playwrights Horizon

Clark Studio Theater – Lincoln Center – Rose Building – 7th Floor at West 65th Street and
Amersterdam Avenue

Classical Theatre of Harlem (Harlem School of the Arts) – 645 St.
Nicholas Avenue

Classic Stage Company Theatre
– 136 East 13th Street – celebrating 35th Anniversary 2003

Clearview Beekman – closing 2005

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center – 107 Suffolk St – Teatro La Tea
theatre – although Living Theatre closed its production of Here We Are at its home on Clinton Street – an extension of Here We Are at the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural and Educational Center, which is just around the corner from us, and we are discussing plans for an extended residency at the Clemente.” The added performances of Here We Are will run from March 26-29/13 – Judith Malina, who used to live above the Clinton Street space, last week moved to an apartment in the Lillian Booth Actors’ Home in Englewood, NJ. Burgess said that, contrary to previous reports, Malina is not retiring. “She is writing a new piece for us as well,” Mr. Burgess said, “and she is writing a piece for the actors who are living at the Lillian Booth home.” Furthermore, she will remain artistic director. Malina is 86.

Cleo’s- 656 9th Avenue, between 45th and 46th Street – Mabel Mercer

Clifton Theatre – closed & demolished

Clinton Hall – see Astor Place Opera House

Clinton Theatre - 1917 – 1228 seats – closed – retail

Clockworks Theatre – 508 East 12th Street (Cosmic Bicycle Company)
(25)

Club – opened 1960

Club Alabam – 44th Street – later became Club Kentucky – 1920s nightclub

Club Black/Pink Room – 605 West 55th Street – cabaret venue

Club Deluxe – Douglas Casino – later Cotton Club – Lennox, 142nd Street
1920-1923

Club 82 – drag revues – closed 1978

*Club El Flamingo
– 547 West 21st Street (between 10th & 11th Aves)

Club Fez - East village burlesque
revue

Club 57 – Livin’ Dolls

Club Gaucho – 245 Sullivan Street – 1930s nightclub

Club Hot Cha – 134th Street – 1930s nightclub

Club Kentucky – see Club Alabam

Club Lido – Edythe & Reardon Sts – 1920s nightclub

Club Midway – rock club

Club Sudan – Lennox 1945

Club USA – see Central Theatre

Club Zanzibar – Broadway & 49th – 1940s nightclub

Cobble Hill Theatre

Coburn Theatre – see 63rd St. Music Hall, Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre

Cocoanut Grove- basement of original Apollo Theatre – 125th Street –
became Rathskellers, then Apollo 1910s to 1930

Cocoanut Grove – see Century Theatre

Coconut Grove – see New Theatre

Cohan and Harris – see Candler Theatre, see Sam H. Harris Theatre -
see Harris (Candler) Theatre – Royal Vagabond 1919 (208)

Cohan’s Theatre – see George M. Cohan Theatre – Broadway and 43rd
Street – 1911

Cohan Theatre – Potash and Perlmutter 1913 (441)

Colden Center for the Performing
Arts
– Queen’s College, Kissena Blvd., Flushing, Queens – programs in
performing and visual arts

Coliseum – see Christy & Wood’s Minstrel Hall – 448 Broadway – minstrel
shows 2nd – Coliseum Theatre – 4 screen theatre at 181st and Broadway – closed
June 2002

*Collective
Unconscious
– 145 Ludlow Street (between Rivington & Stanton Sts)-
storefront theatre

Collier’s Comedy Theatre<.b> – see Comedy Theatre

Colonial Club – 62nd St & Madison Ave

Colonial Theatre – 1887 Broadway at 62nd St – 1265 seats – near the
Circle Theatre – opened 1905 as as legitimate theatre with A Duel in the Snow –
a British pantomime and one act musical The Athletic Girl – but quickly became a
vaudeville house for 20 years – 1912 became Keith’s Colonial – 1917 became New
Colonial with Fred and Adele Astaire; Running Wild 1923; Chocolate Dandies 1924
(96 perf); Lucky Sambo 1925 – 1925 became Hampden’s Theatre – became movie house
in 1931 and in 1956 NBC acquired as televison studio – in the mid 1960s sold to
ABC, and finally in 1971 bought by Rebekah Harkness to house her ballet company
- opened as the Harkness in 1974 – Sweet Bird of Youth; Harkness Ballet; So Long
174th Street 1976; Ipi Tombi – demolished in 1977 and replaced by condominiums

Colonnades Theatre Lab – Moliere In Spite of Himself 1978 (100)

Colony Theater – see Broadway Theatre

Colony Theater – 152 West 71st Street

Colosseum Theatre – 1874 – see Herald Square Theatre

Columbia Theatre – see Central Theatre – opened 1910 – heyday of
burlesque – Broadway’s first burlesque house – demolished

Columbia University Theatre – Brander Matthews Theater – Upstage and
Down (Varsity Revue)1919 (first song by Rodgers and Hammerstein)”There’s Always
Room for One More”

Columbian Gardens – see Niblo’s Gardens

Columbian Theatre – see Lyceum (3rd)

Columbus Circle Theatre – see Majestic Theatre

Comedy Cellar – 117 MacDougal St – bet West 3rd and Minetta Lane – one of the city’s premiere comedy clubs, has featured the likes of Robin Williams and most top headliner comics – Chris Rock,Louis C.K.

Comedy Club – 1885

Comedy Theatre – 108 West 41st Street – built 1909 (796 seats) –
opened with The Melting Pot 1909 (4 months); became Collier’s Comedy Theatre
1910 – Fanny’s First Play 1912; reverted to Comedy Theatre 1913 – The Cub
(Douglas Fairbanks Sr); Speed; Bushido (Katharine Cornell) 1916; In the Zone
(Eugene O’Neill) 1917; Ruth Draper 1917; Maya 1928 – closed from 1931 to 1935 -
Theatre used by Mercury Theatre founded by Orson Welles and John Houseman in
1937 and renamed the Mercury to 1939 – Shoemaker’s Holiday 1938 – group
collapsed in 1938 – 1940 renamed the Artef – In The Zone 1917, Kitty Mackay 1914
(278)- stood empty until demolished in 1942

Comet Theatre –

Comix - 353 West 14th St @ 9th Ave – closed

Commodore – Lexington and 42nd Street – Century Room – Tommy Dorsey 1930s



Common Basis Theatre
– 750 Eighth Avenue (46th & 47th) – 30 seats

Commonwealth Theatre– see Anthony Street Theatre

Concert Elysee – see John Golden Theatre

Concert Salons – by 1869 more than 600 throughout city – densest in
Houston St and Bowery – replaced minstrel and variety halls (alcohol served as
long as curtin did not separate actors and customers)

Concert Theatre – see John Golden Theatre – 202 W 58th St

Coney Island - amusement park built in 1800s with loop roller coaster
(1901), U.S. history, and Nathan’s hot dogs (1916), cyclone (1926); Sideshow by
the Seashore, boardwalk and beach – new project planned with waterfront
residences, seafood market, cinema complex and arcades, facelifts for Aquarium
and rides at Astroland Park – summer 2011 resort will have nearly as many rides as it did in the 1960s. Central Amusement’s Scream Zone, which includes four new rides and the first new roller coasters in Coney Island since 1927, is set to open April 2011 – handful of new bars had opened on West 12th Street, and that rolling chairs — the human-powered rickshaws that rolled down the Boardwalk from the 1920s through the 1960s — might soon return to the beach. The 500-pound Dreamland Pier bell, lost to the sea in a 1911 fire and rediscovered in 2009, was even back in Coney Island on Sunday

Congress (Ace), Bronx 1,800 seats – Closed

*Connelly
Theatre/Metro Playhouse
– 220 East 4th St. (between Avenue A and
Avenue B) (orphanage in late 19th Century) Reopened February 1997 – houses
Connelly and Metro Playhouse (52 seats)

Connie’s Inn
– 2221 7th Avenue at 131st Street – Louis Armstrong – whites only
policy – seeLatin Quarter

Context- 28 Avenue A (74)

Continental Baths – basement of Ansonia Hotel – 2109 Broadway between 73rd & 74th -during 1960s & 1970s – Bette Midler and Barry
Manilow 1971, Melba Moore, Labelle, Peter Allen, Cab Calloway, the Manhattan
Transfer, John Davidson, Wayland Flowers – 1977 became Plato’s Retreat, a heterosexual spot

Conway’s Theatre – Dec. 5, 1876 fire – 285 killed

Cookery – Alberta Hunter

Cooper Cohen Amas Musical Theatre – 334 West 39th Street

Copacabana – 10 E 60th Street – 1940s nightclub

*Copacabana
- 617 West 57th St (between 11th and 12th Avenues) – Since it first
opened in 1941 on the fashionable East Side, it has morphed from the glitziest
nightspot in town to disco on the West Side, the scene of Manilow’s 1978 song
“Copacabana,” and now to a catering business and thumping hip-hop and salsa club
- “When it first opened it was the most famous nightclub in the world,” Juliano
said – featured Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne (1948); Jimmy Durante (1951); Sophie
Tucker, Lena Horne (1948); Nat King Cole (1958); Sammy Davis Jr (1959); Gordon
McRae; Joni James; Howard Keele, and the Copa Girls (Joan Collins and Raquel
Welch got their start in the troupe); Enrique Iglesias – first opened on East
60th – In the ’50s the club brought in rock acts, but its popularity waned as
home television sets became the favourite source of entertainment – closed 1960
and club sat vacant for several years until taken over in 1976, reopening it as
a discoStreet at a time when the Great Depression was over – Bette Midler, Robin
Williams, Red Fox, Peter Allen and Sammy Davis Jr appeared – 1992 they moved the
club across Manhattan to West 57th Street, where it was used in the filming of
“Raging Bull,” “Goodfellas” and “Tootsie,” which starred Dustin Hoffman as a
cross-dresser – has to move locations again as building condemned by city for
subway line extension – new locale tba

COQ Rouge – 65 East 56th St – 1930s nightclub

Corbett Tavern – 1732

Corio Theatre – 337 West Broadway at
Grand St – This is Burlesque (1 year)

Cornelia Connelly Center – 220 East 4th Street
Corner Social – Harlem jazz venue

Coronet 1 & 2 – closed & demolished

Coronet Theatre – see Eugene O’Neill Theatre – Dream Girl (Betty
Field) 1945 (348), Angel in the Wings (Elaine Stritch) 1947 (over a year); All
My Sons (Arthur Kennedy,Ed Begley,Karl Malden) 1947 (328), View From the Bridge
(Van Heflin,Jack Warden,Eileen Heckart) 1955 (149), demolished

*Cort
Theatre
- 138 West 48th St. (Shubert-1,082 seats) – Opened in 1912 (2012 is the 100th Anniversary of the Theatre (Dec 20/12), and in all this time, the name
has never been changed)
with Peg O’ My Heart (Laurette Taylor) (603), – (from 1969 to 1974 theatre was
used for “The Merv Griffin Show”) – Under Cover 1914 (349), Abraham Lincoln
(Frank McGlyn) 1919 (193); Merton of the Movies 1922 (398), Blonde Sinner 1926;
Behold the Bridegroom 1927 (88), Uncle Vanya (Lillian Gish) 1930; Three-Cornered
Moon (Ruth Gordon,Brian Donlevy) 1933 (10 weeks); Boy Meets Girl 1935 (669),
Room Service 1937 (500), Male Animal 1940 (243), Wallflower 1944; Grapes of
Wrath; Candida 1946 (Marlon Brando); Bell for Adano; Shrike (Jose Ferrer) 1952
(161), Fifth Season 1953 (654), Rainmaker (Geraldine Page) 1954 (128); Diary of
Anne Frank (Susan Strasberg,Joseph Schildkraut) 1955 (717), Sunrise at
Campobello 1958 (556), One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Purlie Victorious (Ossie
Davis,Ruby Dee,Godfrey Cambridge,Alan Alda) 1961 (261); Zulu and the Zayda 1965;
Magic Show (Doug Henning,Nathan Lane) (5/74 to 12/78 – 1,920 performances),
1969-1972 became TV studio, back to legit house – Richard III (Al Pacino) 1979;
Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom 1984 (275), Sarafina 1988 (597), Advise and Consent,
Apparition Theatre of Prague, Home, Grapes of Wrath (Gary Sinese) 1990;
Twilight: Los Angeles,1992; Face Value 1993 (closed in previews); Sex and
Longing Dana Ivey,Sigourney Weaver) 1996 (45);Freak (John Leguizamo) 1998 (145);
Marlene 1999; Kat and the Kings 1999 (157); The Green Bird 2000; Hollywood Arms
2002 (76); Bobbi Boland (Farah Fawcett) 2003 (closed after 1 week of
previews);39 Steps 2008; The Lyons (Linda Lavin) 2012;

Cort’s 58th Street – see John Golden Theatre

Cort’s 63rd Street – see 63rd Street Music Hall

Cosmopolitan Theatre
– see Majestic Theatre on 58Th St. – (1043 seats) – demolished

Cosmo Varieties – see Majestic Theatre

Costello Theatre – closed

Cotillion Room – intimate cabaret in Hotel Pierre – Yma Sumac

Cotton Club – 142nd
Street and Lennox – opened 1923 and operated for 17 years as top Harlem
nightspot of notoriety – all white policy with black performers – the biggest
names played here – Duke Ellington 1927; Ethel Waters 1933; Fred Astaire; Gladys
Bentley; Al Jolson; Cab Calloway; Lena Horne started here at 16 years of age –
tapdancers a specialty – moved to 48th Street in 1930s – Ubangi Club in 1936 and
1942 became Latin Quarter 2nd – Cotton Club (NYC) – 48th Street – Duke
Ellington; Bill Bojanges Robinson; Ethel Waters – see also Cotton Club in Harlem
on 142nd St., and Latin Quarter – Harlem’s famed Cotton Club presented “annual revues that featured big band swing and blues, dancers, singers, comedians and novelty acts throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Duke Ellington and his orchestra began a four-year residency in 1927 and continued making guest appearances throughout the 1930s.”

Courtyard Theatre – see Grove Street Playhouse – Porno Stars at Home
1978 (7); Perfect Crime (now uptown over 3,000 performances)

Covent Garden Theatre – see Grove Theatre

Craig Theatre – 152 West 54th St – 1928 – 1400 seats – opened with
Potiphar’s Wife 1928 (2 weeks); The Well of Romance; Jonica; Street Scene 1944;
Look Ma I’m Dancin; On the Town; Brigadoon 1957 (from City Center); Damn Yankees
(moved here); 1931 theatre closed and reopened in 1934 as the Adelphi and in
1940 was renamed the Radiant Center – 1944 Shuberts returned the theatre to
Adelphi – 1949 DuMont Television Network signed a lease and shot the
Honeymooners there – renamed 54th Street Theatre in 1958 – Bye Bye Birdie 1958;
Brigadoon (revival); No Strings – transferred here; What Makes Sammy Run; – in
1965 it became the George Abbott Theatre – Darling of the Day; Buck White,
Gantry (1) – bought by New York Hilton and demolished for a tower addition 1970

Crazy Cat Club – Broadway – 1930s nightclub

Creative Acting Company – 122 West 26th Street, Suite 1102

*Creative Place Theatre – 750 Eighth Avenue

Cricket Theatre – Blood Knot (James Earl Jones) 1964

Criterion Theatre – see Herald Square Theatre, Olympia and New York
Theatres – Barbara Frietchie 1899 (83); 2nd – Criterion Theatre (NYC) – A Grand
Night For Singing 1993 (52); 3rd – Criterion Theatre (NYC) – 1514 Broadway (on
East side between 44th and 45th) – see Olympia – built as part of Hammerstein’s
Olympia completed to seat 2800 with roof garden – opened as Lyric Theatre 1895 –
Barbara Frietchie 1899 (first success) – 1899 changed to Criterion – Scrap of
Paper 1914; Happiness (Laurette Taylor)1917 (136) – became cinema – demolished
1935 together with old Olympia Music Hall – 4th – 2nd Herald Square Theatre,
originally Colosseum, was named Criterion from 1882-1885

Criterion Center Stage Right – 1530 Broadway – (526 seats) see
Roundabout Theatre Company – Starmites 1989

Crossing Jamaica Avenue
Organization

Crotona, Bronx – 1912 – 2,210 seats – Warehouse

Crowder’s Music Hall – see Greenwich Theatre

Crown Gotham – closed

Crucial Arts Organization

Cruger’s Wharf Theatre – opened 1758 below Water Street with Jane
Shore 1758 – see also Wharf Theatre – not used after 1759
Culture Project – formerly Bleecker Street Theater


Culture Project – formerly Bleecker Street Theater;
Currican/Altered Stages
– 154 West 29th St.(between 6th and 7th Aves)
(74)
Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre – 1914 – named the 63rd Street Music Hall – from 1919, it served as a children’s cinema was a Broadway theater, which was active from 1921 to 1941 – opened 1914 as 63rd Street Music Hall and had several other names between 1921 and 1938. 1921, the Cort 63rd Street Theatre was opened in the building. In 1922, the theater renamed Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre, in honor of Augustine Daly – became Coburn Theatre in 1928 and renamed Recital Theatre in 1932, only to become the Park Lane Theatre several months later. From 1934 to 1936 known as Gilmore’s 63rd Street Theatre, and afterwards as the Experimental Theatre. From 1938 until its closure in 1941, it returned to Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre
first production in the theater in 1921 was the premiere of Shuffle Along – Other notable premieres at the theatre were Mae West’s Sex in February 1926 and the English-language version of Friedrich Wolf’s Professor Mamlock in 1937 – building was demolished in 1957

Danceteria 4 floor nightclub 1979-1986 – 30 W 21st St – first one at W 37th St – new wave music – Madonna/Duran Duran/Billy Idol/Cyndi Lauper/Keith Haring/RuPaul/LL Cool J – then 30 E 30th 1990-1993


Dance Theatre Workshop
– 219 West 19th Street

*Danny’s Skylight
Room Cabaret
– 346-348 West 46th Street – opened 1985 – Blossom Dearie
et al – closing Jan 1/07 and restaurant follows on Jan 6/07

Danse de Follies – see New Amsterdam Theatre

*Daryl Roth
Theatre/De La Guarda
- former American Savings Bank building at 20
Union Square E @ 15th Street (499 seats) – In the next few weeks, construction
will begin on a 99-seat, black box second stage at the Daryl Roth Theatre -
D-Lounge is name of the new cabaret space located within theatre – De La Guarda
1998

Davenport Theatre – see also Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre – housed in a remodeled firehouse at 354 West 45th St – mainstage theatre seats 149 and our black box theatre can accommodate 60, to be become 99 – opens with revival of Forbidden Broadway
David Cinema – 236 W. 54th St. – became porn cinema mid 1970s – closed

David H. Koch Theater - formerly New York State Theatre – being renamed
Fall 2008 – see Lincoln Center

Dazian’s Theatrical Emporium – founded 1842 – supplier of costumes to
theatrical trade – closed 1919

*Delacorte Theatre
– Central Park – see New York Shakespeare Festival (1892 seats) 81st
and Central Park – built as temporary structure and opened in June, 1962 – entrance at 81st St & Central Park West, OR 79th St at 5th Avenue -
Merchant of Venice (George C. Scott) 1962; All’s Well That End’s Well & Richard
III (Christopher Walken,Barbara Barrie) 1966; Two Gentlemen of Verona 1971;
Henry V (Paul Rudd,Meryl Streep,Michael Moriarty,Philip Bosco) 1976; Mystery of
Edwin Drood 1985; 4.35 million renovation and opened with Taming of the Shrew
1999; Tartuffe 1999; Julius Caesar (David McCallum) 2000; Seagull (Meryl
Streep,Kevin Kline,Christopher Walken,John Goodman)2001

Delmar Theatre – closed

Delmonico’s – 1900s nightclub (featured in “Hello Dolly”)

Deluxe Club – East 63rd St – 1940s nightclub

Deluxe, Bronx 1,500 seats – Gutted; Retail

Deptford Players

Derby & Harry’s – 1920s nightclub

Dempsey Theatre – Harlem – 127 W 127th St

Dewey Theatre – 14th Street – Wine,Women and Song

Diamond Horseshoe (Billy Rose’s)- 1940s nightclub situated under the
Paramount Hotel on 46th Street – currently under construction

Dicapo Opera Theatre – 184 East
76th Street

Dicken’s Dance House – 5 Points district nightspot – circa 1840s

Dickie Wells – 169 West 133rd St – 1930s nightclub

Dillon’s – 245 West 54th Street – back room cabaret with 100 seats -
across from former Studio 54

Dimson Theatre – 108 East 15th Street (between Union Square E. &
Irving Place)

Directors Guild of America Theatre – open

*Dixon Place – 309 East
26th Street – relocated – was at 258 Bowery

Dockstader’s Minstrel Hall – 1886 – Broadway near 29th St.

Dodgers Costumes - established 1998 – closed Feb 25/05

Dodger Stages – opening
2003 – at Worldwide Plaza – formerly Cineplex Odeon – 340 West 50th Street,
between Eighth & Ninth Avenues – name being changed to New World Stages April
1/06 – 5 performance spaces and one rehearsal space – two 499 seat theatres, 2
400 seat theatres and one with 299 seats – Included in the complex:Theater I,
499 seats;Theater II, 360 seats;Theater III, 499 seats;Theater IV, 360 seats;
Theatre V, 199 seats;see also Worldwide Plaza

Donaldson’s Opera House – Broadway opposite Bond St – minstel shows – see
Old Stuyvesant Hall

Do Gooder Productions – 233E 86th
Street, Suite 2A, NY 10028 – 2 1/2 Jews (322 perf – 1998-99); My Soul is Mine: A Runaway’s Story (1995); The Magic Formula (1995-96); On Deaf Ears (1996-97);

Don’t Tell Mama
- 343 West 46th St-intimate bar/cabaret – Hard Time to Be Single 1990; Honky-Tonk
Highway 1994; That Time of the Year 1996

Douglas Casino – later Cotton Club – 142nd Street – 1910s

*Douglas
Fairbanks
- 432 West 42nd St. (between 9th & 10th Sts)(286 seats) -
Geniuses; When Pigs Fly 1996 (334); If It Was Easy 2000; Forbidden Broadway
2001; Mr. President 2001; Forbidden Broadway 20th Anniversary Celebration 2003 -
as of 2004 Douglas Fairbanks Theatre and John Houseman Theatre are being vacated
in preparation for demolition – it is likely a large residential tower will go
up on the south side of 42nd Street between Dyer and 10th Avenues – currently
home to the long-running musical spoof Forbidden Broadway – closed

Douglas Theatre – closed & demolished

Downstairs at the Upstairs – see more listings at Upstairs at the Downstairs -
…And in this Corner 1964; Bette Midler (early 1970s) – Joan Rivers, Julius Monk Revues

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre – below Sofia’s Restaurant (Edison Hotel) -
Girl’s Night: the Musical 2009

Downstairs Room – 51st Street – later became Upstairs at the Downstairs

Downtime – rock club – see Rebel

Downtown Theatre – Prodigal 1960 (several months)

Drama Book Shop – opened 1917 as card table in lobby of a Broadway theatre
- after 20 years in 2nd floor space on 7th Avenue near 47th Street, moved 2001
to 40th Street near 8th Avenue
Drama League Theater Center – new home May 2013 – 32 Avenue of the Americas – focal point is Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comley Studio Lab, a brand-new laboratory/development space for theater artists to create and hone work for future productions
Dramatists Guild – established 1925

Dramatists Play Service – established 1936

Dramatists Theatre – founded 1923

Dresden Theatre – see New Amsterdam

DR2 Theatre- 103 E. 15th Street, off Union Square – being used by new
repertory company – Epic Repertory

Drury Lane Theatre – closed

*Duffy-
1553 Broadway @ 46th St. – former strip club called Paris Burlesque which was
shut down in 1991 for harboring prostitution – 165 seats – Perfect Crime has
been playing since 1987 (has outgrown 4 theatres including Theatre Four and 47th
Street Theatre) – theatre moved to 1627 Broadway at 50th St

*Duke on 42nd Street
- 229 West 42nd Street (between 7th & 8th Sts)- part of the
redevelopment of 42nd Street – 199 seats – theatre housed in a 10 story building
- on 2nd floor – Jewish Repertory Theatre resident company – Spitfire Grill 2001

DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) – performance space used
by such troupes as GAle GAtes et al

Duo Theatre – 62 East 4th Street – Born to Rumba 1991; Chez Garbo
1996

*Duplex Cabaret
- 61 Christopher Street (at 7th Avenue) – New York’s oldest continuing cabaret -
Woody Allen, Joan Rivers, Dawn Hampton – Bed, Boys and Beyond 2000

D.W. Griffith Theatre - see Bijou Theatre

Dwyer Cultural Center

E

Eagle (Variety) Theatre – (see Standard Theatre and Manhattan
Theatre) – Broadway below 33rd St – 1875 – name changed to Standard Theatre 1878
– D’Oyly Carte Opera Co – 1883 destroyed by fire – rebuilt in became Manhattan
Theatre 1898 – 1907 showed motion pictures – 1909 razed for Gimbel’s

Eagle – 1927 – 1200 seats – now retail

Earl Carroll Theatre – 753 Seventh Avenue (SE corner of 7th and
50th)- built in 1922 with 1026 seats – atmospheric type – Bavu 1922; Earl
Carroll’s Sketchbook (400); Earl Carroll’s Vanities (W.C.Fields) 1928;Jimmy Durante – theatre demolished in 1930 and
reopened as a new Earl Carroll Theatre 1931 with Earl Carroll’s Vanities;
Gingham Girl – Manhattan’s largest playhouse opened in 1931 – Ziegfeld took over
theatre in 1932 and renamed it the Casino Theatre – W.C. Fields, Milton Berle,
Jack BennyShowboat revival 1932; Desire Under the Elms – became film house after
Ziegfeld’s death and a cabaret called the French Casino – 1936 Billy Rose took
the reins and it became Casa Manana – 1939 the theatre closed and reopened as
Woolworths but in 1990 the businesses were evicted and the remains of the
theatre were demolished; 2nd theatre – opened on same site 1931 – 3000 seats –
opened with Bavu (Carlotta Monerey and William Powell) 1931; Just Because; The
Gingham Girl 1922 (8 mos); Vanities of 1923; Kid Boots (Eddie Cantor); Desire
Under the Elms; Earl Carroll Vanities of 1928 (W.C.Fields); Fioretta 1929 (Fanny
Brice,Leon Errol); Earl Carroll’s Sketchbook (400); Broadway’s Second Earl
Carroll Theatre opened August 1931 with ninth edition of the Vanities in 6
months the theatre was foreclosed, Ziegfeld took over – and renamed it the
Casino and mounted revival of ShowBoat starring Paul Robeson – reopened 1932 as
Casino – George White’s Music Hall Varieties of 1933; Melody – In 1934 became
French Casino, in 1936 Billy Rose took over and in 1938 became Casa Manana –
demolished 1990


East 74th Street Theatre/Eastside Playhouse – see also Phoenix -
Crystal Heart 1960; Last Sweet Days of Isaac 1970; In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel –
demolished

East Side Beauty Theatre – closed & demolished

Eastside Cinema – closed

Eaves-Brooks – principal costume maker for modern plays – formed 1981 –
company formed by merger of Brooks (est. 1861) and Eaves (est. 1864)

Eaves Costumes – founded 1861 on E 12th Street – acquired Brooks-Van Horn
Costume Company (est. 1864) in 1981 – moved to Long Island

Ebony Club – 1678 Broadway, was Ubangi, Birdland

Eden Roc – 148 E 48th Street – famous nightclub

Eden Theatre – see Phoenix – Oh Calcutta 1969 (1314)(revived 1969
with record of one of longest running musicals (5,969 performances), Grease 1972
(3388 with move to Broadway),

*Edison – (Vegas Room )
240 West 47th St. – Show Me Where the Good Times Are 1970; Oh Calcutta 1971
(5959); Don’t Bother Me I Can’t Cope (Micki Grant) 1972 (1,065); Hard Job Being
Good 1972 – now known as the Supper Club, an inviting nightclub venue

Edison (Columbia, 103rd st) – 1913 – 600 seats – Razed

Edmonds Cellar – 130th Street – 1910s nightclub – Gladys Bentley

Ed Sullivan Theatre – see Hammerstein’s Theatre – 1697 Broadway
between 53rd & 54th – opened as Hammerstein’s 1927 – Golden Dawn 1927 – Billy
Rose converted to nightclub Manhattan – Murder in the Cathedral – 1936 became
radio studio – 1967 renamed Ed Sullivan Theatre – now home to David Letterman

*Educational Alliance – Mazer Theatre – 197 East Broadway

Edyth Totten Theatre – 247 West 48th Street – 1926 – 299 seats –
opened with Secret Sands (1926) – Lido Girl 1928; Guinea Pig (69); renamed the
President 1929 – see also 48th Street – changed names many, many times – showed
German films 1932 as the Hindenburg – 1933 became the Caruso Cinema showing
Italian films – then Midget Theatre for plays – back to the President in 1934,
then the Artef, Acme Theatre for films in 1937, American Show Shop in 1937 for
stage performances and then Show Shop in 1938 for films – then became 48th
Street Theatre when that theatre was renamed the Windsor but gave it up in 1943
when 48th Street theatre went back to original name, it became the President
once again – then Erwin Piscator’s Dramatic Workshop before being purchased by
Mamma Leone’s and extending their restaurant – the entire structure demolished
in 1988

8th Street Playhouse - 52 West 8th Street – was home of the 8th
Street Players – The Rocky Horror Picture Show 1981 – now a video shop – see the
Village Barn

Eighty-Eights Cabaret – 228 West 10th Street – intimate cabaret –
Pictures in the Hall 1990; Cast of Thousands 1995 – closed May 1999

81st Street Theatre – The Kitchen (Rip Torn,Sylvia Miles) 1966 (136)

86th Street Casino Theatre - 1934 – 600 seats

86th Street Grande Theatre – closed & demolished

86th Street Theatre – 86th Street – Ethel Merman in vaudeville show
1930 – closed & demolished

El Chico – 30 Grove Street – 1930s nightclub

Electric Circus – opened 1967 on St. Mark’s Place

Elektra Theatre – 673 8th Avenue at 42nd Street – has been specially constructed to be the new home of SILENCE! The Musical – gorgeous new – Part of the Eighth Avenue performance complex that once housed the Show World Center porn labyrinth, Elektra was renovated and opened in 2012 as a new home for the long-running musical spoof Silence! The Musical

El Flamingo – 547 West 21st Street – Donkey Show 1999 (still running
Aug 18/02 – 3 years)

Elgin Theatre – open

Elinor Bunin Muroe Film Center – see Film Society of Lincoln Centre

Elk’s Rendezvous – Harlem 1920s nightspot

Ellen Stewart Theatre – House of Leather 1970; Colette 1970

El Morrocco – 154 54th Street – 1930s nightclub – The Stork, Copacabana, Latin Quarter, Persian Room–meccas where songwriters, singers and starry society mingled and fueled American popular music. Deborah Grace Winer conjures the brassy spots and smoky boîtes that were the musical playpens for artists from the Gershwins and Ethel Merman to Sammy Cahn and the Rat Pack.

Elmwood Theatre – Elmhurst, Queens – Atmospheric style – closed
-renovations

Eltinge 42nd Street Theatre – 236 West 42nd St – opened 1912 as the
Empire Theatre (900 seats) – premiere production was Within the Law (Jane Cowl)
1912 (541); First Night 1912 (541), Song of Songs 1914; Yellow Ticket (John
Barrymore) 1914 (183); Fair and Warmer 1915 (377); Business Before Pleasure 1917
(357); Up in Mabel’s Room 1919 (229), Murder on the Second Floor 1919 (Laurence
Olivier) (45 perf); Girl in the Limousine; Ladies Night in a Turkish Bath 1920
(375); East of Suez 1921 (100); Fall Guy 1925 (177); Her Cardboard Lover (Jeanne
Eagels) 1927 (13 weeks); Love, Honor, and Betray 1930 (Clark Gable); – became
burlesque & movie house 1930 – First Night 1931 (88); Barretts of Wimpole Street
1931 (372); Old Maid 1935 (305); Life With Father 1939 (3224); closed 1942 and
in 1943 became cinema – Member of the Wedding (Julie Harris,Ethel Waters,Brandon
DeWilde) 1950 (501); I Am a Camera 1951 (262); Long Days 1951 (3); Time of the
Cuckoo 1952 (263); Song of Songs, Girl in the Limousine – 1931 became a
burlesque house – in 1942 mayor shut down theatre for moral reasons and became
movie theatre – renamed “Laff Movie Theatre” – dedicated to filmed comedy – 1954
became the Empire Theatre – closed mid 1980s – exterior will be restored as
entrance to AMC movie center complex

Eltinge Theatre – Girl I Left Behind Me 1893 (208), Masquerade 1894;
Bohemia 1895; Peter Pan (Maude Adams) 1905; Within the Law 1914 (541);

El Toreador – Harlem nightspot 1930s

Elysee – see John Golden Theatre

Embassy Cinema – closed & demolished

Embassy Five – see Gaiety Theatre

Embassy 49th Theatre – 1938 – 588 seats – Razed – see Punch & Judy
Theatre

Embassy 72nd Street Theatre -193? – 516 seats – Razed, 1988 (c.)

Embassy Theatre – 1560 Broadway – 1925 to present – now Times Square
Visitors Center – see Gaiety

Embassy 2,3,4 – closed

Embassy World – see Charles Hopkins Theatre

Embers – 161 E 54th Street – jazz – famous nightclub

Emerging Artists Theatre Company

Empire Theatre
– 1430 Broadway and 40th St – built 1893 – 1099 seats – across from
Metropolitan Opera House – one block up from Casino – opened with The Girl I
Left Behind Me 1893; Little Minister (Ethel Barrymore) 1896; My Wife (Billy
Burke) 1897 (129); Mummy and the Humming Bird 1902; renovated 1903 – Mamba’s
Daughters; Barretts of Wimpole Street; Mistress Mine; Peter Pan (Maude Adams);
Legend of Leonora (Maude Adams) 1914; Declassee 1919 (257); Czarina 1922 (136);
Senorita Raquel Meller 1926 (1 month); Age of Innocence 1928; Threepenny Opera
(Burgess Meredith) 1933 (12); Hamlet (John Gielgud,Lillian Gish,Judith Anderson)
1936 (132); Life With Father (Howard Lindsay,Dorothy Stickney) 1939 (3224);
Member of the Wedding 1950 (501); Time of the Cuckoo; Highlights of the Empire;
I Am a Camera (Julie Harris) – for many years oldest and most prestigious
playhouse in New York – same name used by Eltinge; final show Time of the Cuckoo
(Shirley Booth) 1952 (263) – demolished 1953 2nd -
Empire Theatre(NYC) – opened 1912 as
the Eltinge 42nd Street Theatre – 900 seat legitimate theatre – Laurence
Olivier, Clark Gable, Abbott and Costello graced the stage – theatre became
burlesque house in 1931 and in 1942 was renamed the Laff Movie – renamed again
in 1954 as the Empire – a movie house until closed in the mid 1980s – the
landmark theatre was moved 168 feet toward 8th Avenue in 1998 and now serves as
the entrance, lobby and box office for the AMC Empire 25 and Times Square Café -
tenants Madame Tussaud’s, 25-screen American MultiCinemas (AMC) – entertainment
and retail complex has also restored historic facades of Liberty and Empire
Theaters – Czarina (Basil Rathbone) 1922 (136); Empire, Bronx 1894 – 1,800 seats
- Church

Empress Theatre – closed

Encore - piano bar and show room – 266 West 47th Street – opening
February, 2005 – seats approximately 70-75 people

*Ensemble Studio
Theatre/Medicine Show
– 549 West 52nd St. (10th & 11th)two theatres -
a second floor theatre of 99 seats, and 6th floor theatre of 60 seats; NYCHPD in
which The Dermot Company, Inc. will develop new homes for Intar Theater and
Ensemble Studio Theater at a proposed city-owned Clinton Green

Entermedia – Best Little Whorehouse in Texas 1978 (1576); Taking My
Turn 1983

Epic Repertory - 103 E. 15th Street
- DR2 Theatre off Union Square

Epic Theatre Center - founded 2001 – becomes Epic Theatre Ensemble Sept
4/07

Epiphany Theatre -
154 Christopher Street

*Equity Library Theatre – founded 1943 by Sam Jaffe – designed to provide a showcase for young actors, directors, and technicians and to create an audience from among those who could not afford commercial theatre. A non?profit organization, it originally presented its plays at libraries and charged no admission but asked instead for a contribution to help sustain it. Beginning in 1949 it operated its own theatre, first at the Lenox Hill Playhouse and later at other auditoriums. Actors whose careers were helped by early appearances with the organization include James Earl Jones, Richard Kiley, and Jason Robards. Financial problems forced its closing during the 1989–90 season – winner of Regional Theatre Tony Award 1977 – Follies; Two 1978

Equity Players – formed 1922 – later changed to Actors’ Theatre – 1927
group absorbed by Kenneth MacGowan’s Company in Greenwich Village

Erlanger’s Theatre – 1927 – 44th Street between Broadway and 8th
Avenue – opened with Merry Malones (Cohans); Fine and Dandy 1930 (255) – later
changed to the St. James

Eros Cinema – 732 8th Avenue near 46th St – later a male porn house – a
conversion of former retail space and operated under several names over the
years – closed

Erwin Piscator’s Dramatic Workshop – see Edyth Totten Theatre

Erwin Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre

Essex House – 160 Central Park South – Casino-on-the-Park – popular
nightspot in 1930s

Essex Theatre – closed

Estelle R. Newman Theatre – see Public Theatre

*Ethel
Barrymore Theatre
– 243 West 47th St. (Shubert-1,056 seats) Built in
1928 in honour of Ms. Barrymore – Kingdom of God 1928 (opening production of
renamed Ethel Barrymore)(Ethel Barrymore)1928 (3 months);Design for Living; Gay
Divorce 1932 (248), Whistling in the Dark (Claire Trevor) 1932; Women 1936
(657); Bury the Dead 1936 (3 months); Women 1937 (657); Knickerbocker Holiday
1938; Key Largo 1939 (105), No Time For Comedy (Katharine Cornell,Laurence
Olivier) 1939 (185), Pal Joey (Gene Kelly,Van Johnson) 1940 (374), Best Foot
Forward 1941; Tomorrow the World 1943 (500), Streetcar Named Desire (Jessica
Tandy,Marlon Brando,Kim Hunter,Karl Malden) 1947 (855); Bell, Book,and Candle (Lilli
Palmer,Rex Harrison) 1950 (233); Fourposter (Jessica Tandy,Hume Cronyn) 1951
(632), Tea and Sympathy 1953 (712), Desperate Hours (Paul Newman,Karl Malden
1955 (212); New Faces of 1956; Look Homeward Angel 1957 (564), Small War on
Murray Hill (Leo Genn,Jan Sterling,Daniel Massey) 1957 (12); Don’t Drink the
Water; Raisin in the Sun (Claudia McNeil,Ruby Dee,Louis Gossett,Diana Sands)
1959 (530), Moby Dick (Rod Steiger) 1962 (2 weeks); Wait Until Dark 1966 (373),
Black Comedy (Michael Crawford,Lynn Redgrave) 1967 (337); Ain’t Supposed to Die
a Natural Death 1971; Inner City 1971; Don’t Play Us Cheap 1972; Travesties
(John Wood,Tim Curry) 1975 (155); Robber Bridgegroom 1975 (145) transferred from
Harkness Theatre; I Love My Wife 1977 (872), American Buffalo – 1977 (135);
Romantic Comedy (Anthony Perkins,Mia Farrow) 1979 (396), Hurly Burly 1984 (343)
after an off-Broadway run; Is There Life After High School? 1982; Baby 1983;
Hurlyburly (Harvey Keitel,William Hurt,Ron Silver,Jerry Stiller,Cynthia
Nixon,Sigourney Weaver,Judith Ivey) 1984 (343); Joe Turner’s Come and Gone
(Angela Bassett) 1988; Foxfire (Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn); Streetcar Named
Desire (Alec Baldwin,Amy Madigan,Jessica Lange) 1992; Sisters Rosenweig (Jane
Alexander,Robert Klein,Madeline Kahn) 1993 (85); The Life 1997 (466);Putting It
Together (Carol Burnett,George Hearn,Ruthie Henshall,Bronson Pinchot)1999 (103);
Amy’s View (Judi Dench) 1999 (115), Lunch Hour, Poor Murderer; Real Thing 2000;
Tale of the Allergist’s Wife (2000);Imaginary Friends (Cherry Jones,Swoosie
Kurtz) 2002 – renovated 2004 – Arcadia 2011;

*Eugene
O’Neill Theatre
– 230 West 49th St. (Jujamcyn-1,112 seats) – Built in
1925 as the Forrest – Mayflower 1925; first success Tobacco Road 1934-41 which
transferred from the John Golden – renamed in 1959 for the only U.S. playwright
to receive the Nobel prize for Literature – closed 1945 – reopened as Coronet
Theatre –In 1959 it was renamed the Eugene O’Neill – Dream Girl; All My Sons;
Let It Ride 1961; Show Girl 1961; She Loves Me 1963; Something More (Barbara
Cook) 1964 (15); Last of the Red Hot Lovers 1969 (706), Prisoner of Second
Avenue 1971 (780), Yentl (Tovah Feldshuh) 1975 (224); California Suite (Tammy
Grimes,George Grizzard,Jack Weston,Barbara Barrie) 1976 (445); Big River (John
Goodman,Rene Auberjonois) 1985 (1005), M. Butterfly 1988 (777), Canterbury
Tales, I Ought To Be In Pictures (Dinah Manoff,Joyce Van Patten,Ron Leibman)
1980 (324), Big River 1985; M. Butterfly (John Lithgow,B.D.Wong) 1988 (777); Cat
on a Hot Tin Roof (Kathleen Turner,Charles Durning) 1990 (149); Five Guys Named
Moe 1992; Grease (revival – Rose O’Donnell) 1994; Death of a Salesman (Brian
Dennehy) 1999; The Full Monty (2000);Nine (Antonio Banderas,Chita Rivera,Jane
Krakowski)2003 (285);Spring Awakening 2006; Book of Mormon – 2011;

Euterpean Hall – see Broadway Theatre

Evergreen – see Theatre Four – Boys in the Band, Geese, House of
Flowers – demolished

Exchange – Theatre Row, 42nd St – 2010 – one of first off broadway houses to form subscription series with 3 other theatre groups, Civilians, Talking Band, and Rude Mechs

Exclusive Club – Harlem nightspot 1920s

*Expanded Arts
- 85 Ludlow Street (between Delancey & Rivington St. (25)- storefront theatre

Experimental Theatre – West 63rd, East of Broadway – established
1935 to offer work for theatrical professionals idled by the Depression – by
1936 some 5,385 professionals were at work in NYC alone – numerous companies
sprang up across country – 1939 project abolished – see 63rd St. Music
Hall/Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre

F

Factory – rock club – 1960s

Famous Door – 66 West 52nd Street – Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Prima 1930s

Famous Kitchen – 318 West 45th Street – famous nightclub

Fat Black Pussycat – Minetta Lane – Bob Dylan 1962 – now Mexican
restaurant – Fat Black Pussycat moved to West 3rd and 6th Ave, across from the
famous Blue Note

Fazil’s Times Square Studio – closed Feb, 2008, after 73 years as a
ramshackle, homey rehearsal center that served as a mecca for everyone from
movie stars to struggling tap, flamenco and Middle Eastern dancers – talents
such as Honi Coles and Charles Cook, Alvin Ailey, Savion Glover, rehearsals for
Broadway musicals – Fazil’s was first known as Michael’s – immortalized in the
1948 film musical “Easter Parade” when Fred Astaire invites Judy Garland to run
over to Michael’s and go through some steps. The center’s next owner was Jerry
LeRoy, a vaudevillian whose specialty was tap dancing in ice skates, who renamed
it after himself – Woody Allen’s “Broadway Danny Rose” and Nick Castle’s “Tap.”
Gregory Hines, a fixture at Fazil’s, modeled Sonny’s, the hoofers’ hangout in
“Tap,” after Studio A-1. When Fazil’s received a move-out date from its landlord
in July, work began on “And 5, 6, 7, 8 …,” a documentary about the studio by
the filmmaker Timur Civan, Ms. Civan’s son – building is one of several on the
block slated for demolition to make way for new construction -Fazil’s still has
a branch in Istanbul, in an old building where posters for Turkish movies were
once printed

Federal Music Theatre – see Gallo Opera House, Studio 54

Federal Theatre – Macbeth; R.U.R.; Battle Hymn 1936

Feinstein’s
- (Regency Hotel) – 540 Park Avenue @ 61st Street- 140 seat cabaret room –
opened 1999 – Michael Feinstein, Feinstein’s at Loews Regency will close on December 31, 2012
- will be moving to a new location in 2013 when the Loews Regency Hotel undergoes a major renovation -
Rosemary Clooney, Steve Tyrell, Barbara Cook, Glen Campbell, Diahann Carroll, Jane Krakowski, Lea Michele, Cyndi Lauper, Jason Mraz and Alan Cumming amongst hundreds of other performers

Fellow’s Opera House & Hall of Lyrics – “444” Broadway above Howard &
Canal Sts – next to old Olympic Theatre which changed to 442 Broadway – had been
Tattersall’s Stables which was razed 1850 and replaced by City Assembly Rooms –
1854 burned to ground but hall at 444 was reconstructed as a minstrel theatre –
many name changes – 1860 was Broadway Boudoir – 1866 burned again but not
rebuilt

Fenway (Beneson), Bronx – 1921 1,400 seats -1921 Razed

Festival Theatre - closed

*Fez
Theater/FEZ Under TIME CAFE
– 380 Lafayette St @ Great Jones St.
Feinstein’s on Broadway – opening soon
Fifth Avenue Club – 5th Avenue & Broadway – 1920s nightspot

Fifth Avenue Hotel – Salon Madrid – 5th Avenue & 9th St – 1930s nightspot

Fifth Avenue Opera House – see Fifth Avenue Theatre – 1865 – 5th Avenue at
24th Street – later 5th Avenue, Broughman’s – demolished 1873 by fire -
Fifth Avenue Theatre
(NYC) – (see Madison Square Theatre and Daly’s Fifth Avenue) – first built on
24th Street in 1862 as adjunct to Fifth Avenue Hotel – built originally as stock
exchange – became theatre in 1865 when occupied by George Christy’s Minstrels –
redecorated in 1867 but lasted short time – 1868 became Brougham’s Theatre -
1869 first great company until destroyed by fire 1873 – lay in ruins for several
years site was later used for Fifth Avenue Hall – became Madison Square Theatre
1877, then became Hoyt’s Theatre, H.C. Miner’s 5th Avenue – Pirates of Penzance
1879 – underwent several name changes – burned 1891 –

Fifth Avenue Theatre
– rebuilt as vaudeville, film
and burlesque house – closed 1908, before being torn down 1938 – 2nd at 27
West 28th St, Fifth Avenue and 28th Street West , near Broadway; – built as
Fifth Avenue Opera House (1254 seats) specializing in Negro Minstrel shows –
1867 – 1869 became Daly’s Fifth Avenue Theatre – 1873 burnt down and not
rebuilt; 3rd Fifth Avenue Theatre (1254 seats) – opened at 1185 Broadway and
28th Street – 1873 – not located on 5th Avenue but took name from prior venue
which was destroyed by fire in 1891 – rebuilt in 1900 – slipped into decline and
showed movies and vaudeville -had many name changes and was demolished 1908; 4th
- the New Fifth Avenue Theatre opened in 1892 on West 28th Street on the site of
its namesake which had burned down in 1891; 5th – 5th Avenue Theatre (Apollo
Hall) (NYC)- Madison Square Theatre built on this site when Fifth Avenue
destroyed by fire in 1873 – 5th Avenue & 26th St (1,254 seats) – built in 1862
at 24th Street and 5th Avenue but closed abruptly when man killed – reopened
1869 – destroyed by fire in 1873 – demolished; 6th at Broadway and 28th Street –
Love’s Labour Lost 1874; Shore Acres 1893 (244), Saratoga or Pistols for Seven
1870 (101), Divorce 1871 (200), Big Bonanza 1875 (137) Pique 1875 (237), In
Mizzoura 1893 (64)

50th Street Theatre – see Princess Theatre

Fifty-Eighth Street Theatre – see John Golden Theatre

58th Street Theatre – see John Golden Theatre

55th Street Playhouse – closed

51st Street Theatre – see Hollywood Theatre, see Mark Hellinger
Theatre

54th Street Theatre – see Craig Theatre, George Abbott Theatre – 302
West 45th St. – (see Martin Beck) – Caligula 1960 (38); Kwamina 1961; 13
Daughters 1961; No Strings 1962 (580), What Makes Sammy Run 1964 (540), Bye Bye
Birdie 1960 (607), Kiss Me Kate 2000 (revival)

59E59 - 59 East 59th Street – $7 million theatrical boost to house 3
theatres with seating of 199, 99 and 50 – largest will house Primary Stages -
opening March 2004 with The Stendahl Syndrome (Isabella Rossellini and Richard
Thomas); new British plays will occupy all 3 spaces from April 5 to July 4/04

Filmarte- see John Golden Theatre

Film Forum 1 & 2 – closed & demolished

Film Society of Lincoln Centre – opens June 7/11 – West 65th Street – 150 and 90 seats – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center – indoor cafe and audirorium (75 seats) for lectures

*Firebird
Café
– 363 West 46th Street (between 8th and 9th) – the Firebird
Upstairs Supperclub opened 2003 showcasing top cabaret talent – intimate cabaret
space that is part of Firebird Restaurant – upstairs supper club has closed down
as of Feb/03 – remainder closed 2003 – the space is being gutted and reportedly
will be converted to an Irish Pub as of Jan/04

Fine Arts – 1953 – 540 seats – see John Golden Theatre

First Avenue Screening Room – closed

Flamboyan Theater – 107 Suffolk Street (at Delancey)

*Flatiron
Playhouse
– 119 West 23rd St (between 6th & 7th Aves)- 60 seats in 3rd
floor of office building – Flatiron Playhouse, 23rd Street one block from the
historic Flatiron Building – was home to Italian American Theatre Company and
known as the Duality Playhouse – revival of Bent; Shadowbox, One Flew Over the
Cuckoo’s Nest; an all-male Medea

**Flea Theatre
- 41 White St. (Church & Broadway)- home of Bat Theatre Company – founded 1996 – located in downtown Manhattan now has a permanent home at 20 Thomas Street
Flea, founded in 1996, currently operates in rented digs — housing a 75-seat theatre and a 40-seat theatre — at 41 White Street – to build new complex housing 3 theatres at 20 Thomas St

Fleetwood, Bronx – 1927 – 1,700 seats – 1927 Closed; altered

Flushing Town Hall – 137-35
Northern Blvd – programs in performing and visual arts

Flying Bridge Community Arts – 522A Court Street, Carroll Gardens

Folies Bergere Theatre – 210 West 46th St – 1911 – opened as a
dinner theatre with vaudeville Hell/Temptation/Gaby 1911 (92); – closed after a
few short months – originally built as a hall in 1869 – reopened as The Fulton
in 1911 with Cave Man (2 weeks) – Yellow Jacket 1912; Damaged Goods 1912;
Misleading Lady (Lewis Stone,George Abbott) 1913 (183), Twin Beds (411), Abie’s
Irish Rose – transferred to the Republic for majority of 8 year run; Jazz Singer
1925 (303), Oh, Please (Beatrice Lillie); Dracula 1927 (Bela Lugosi); New Faces
of 1934 (Imogene Coca,Henry Fonda); Arsenic and Old Lace 1941 (1,444) and
eventually changed to Helen Hayes Theatre in 1955 – Gigi 1950s; Seven Year Itch;
Long Day’s Journey Into Night 1956; Mary Mary 1961 (1572), Hadrian VII; The Me
Nobody Knows; Royal Family – 1982 demolished after the Astor, Victoria, Bijou,
and Morosco had been razed

Folksbiene Yiddish Theatre (Peoples’ Stage) – Yiddish amateur groups –
formed 1915 by merger of several older companies including Progressive Dramatic
Club and Hebrew Dramatic League – Second Avenue was the address of New York’s
Yiddish theatre community during its heyday in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
The street was lined with playhouses from Houston Street to 14th Street and
supported the careers of countless Yiddish actors and playwrights – 90-year-old
Folksbiene is America’s only professional Yiddish theatre – see Folksbiene
Playhouse

Folksbiene Playhouse – 123 East 55th Street – see Folksbiene Yiddish
Theatre

Follies Theatre

Fools Company Space (96) – 356 West 44th Street

Fontana’s – rock club – Eldridge St

*Ford Center for
the Performing Arts
- 213 West 42nd St. – being renamed to Hilton
Theatre early 2005 – (1,839 seats) – Lyric Theatre torn down but façade is still
intact, but the Apollo Theatre was completely demolished – a cost of 30 million
dollars – opened in 1998 (previews Dec. 26, 1997) with Ragtime (Marin
Mazzie,Brian Stokes Mitchell,Audra McDonald,Judy Kaye) (861), Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat 2000, Forty Second Street 2001 – see Hilton, and Foxwoods Theatre – Now renamed the Foxwoods, previously Hilton Theater. Reconstructed from the vintage 1903 Lyric and 1920 Apollo music theatres by entrepreneur Garth Drabinsky, the Ford Center, on New York’s reinvigorated 42nd Street, is an 1,821-seat theatre with an atmosphere of pure fantasy


Fordham University Theatre –

Forest Hills Tennis Stadium – historic NY Queens stadium – reopened August 2013 with Mumford & Sons concert – 16,000 seats – hosted US Open until 1978 – first concert at the 90 year old stadium in more than 20 years, where acts like Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Beatles, Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan – venue ended when Open moved to Flushing Meadows

Forrest Theatre – renamed Coronet and became the Eugene O’Neill% – opened with Mayflowers

Fortune – War Games; Murder in the Vicarage 1976 (1,776) – demolished

Fortway Theater – Brooklyn – Atmospheric style – closed

48th Street Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre – Pick Up Girl; (20 mos); 2nd – E48th Street Theatre – West 48th Street (same name used by Edyth Totten) – 969 seats – see Windsor Theatre – opened with Just Like John 1912; Never Say Die; Today; Thirteenth Chair 1916 (328), Torch Bearers 1922 (135); Bit of Love 1925 (4)- Martha Graham made concert debut here in 1926; Expressing Willie 1924 (293),The Squall 1926 (444), 1937 to 1943 changed to lst run movie house called the Windsor; leased to Labor Stage, Pins and Needles moved here to complete run; Sweet Nell of Old Drury (revival) (Alfred Lunt,Lynn Fontanne,Laurette Taylor,Howard Lindsay) (35) 1928; Cock Robin1928; Brothers; Unexpected Husband; Steets of New York; Fly Away Home (Montgomery Clift,Thomas Mitchell 1935 (204); Work is For Horses; Cradle Will Rock (Will Geer,Howard da Silva)(108) – 1943 returned to 48th Street Theatre – Harvey 1944 (1775) as 48th Street Theatre, Traitor 1949 (67); Stalag 1951 (472), Men of Distinction; Hayride; Tea and Sympathy moved here in 1955%20- 1955 water tank gave way through roof and theatre was eventually demolished 1966 and now parking garage; Bleeker Theatre Bleeker Street

45 Bleecker Street Theater – Theaters at 45 Bleecker Street – Off-Broadway house in the East Village – venue is home to the 200-300 seat Bleecker Theater – to become Lynn Redgrave Theatre as of June 2013;
100-150 seat Lafayette Theater, and Green Room
45th Street Theatre see also Primary Stages – 99 seat Off-Broadway house, for nearly 20years thundered with the voices of new and established American playwrights; Stage Too Theatre, formerly the Phil Bosakowski, is a lovely 47 seat, intimate proscenium space

44th Street Theatre – see Weber and Fields Music Hall – West 44th St – 1912 – opened as New Weber and Fields Music Hall (1463seats) – on the roof was the Nora Bayes Theatre – basement housed the Little Club famous during prohibition and became Stage Door Canteen during WWII – The Geisha1913; Harry Houdini 1925; Animal Crackers; Four Saints in Three Acts; Night in Spain 1927; Johnny Johnson 1936; Rosalinda 1942 (521) – demolished 1945

49th Street Theatre – West 49th Street – 1921- 750 seats – opened with Face Value 1921; Chauve-Souris 1922 – moved to Century Roof (520); Whispering Wives 1923 (44 weeks); Give and Take 1923; Gypsy Jim (20weeks); Fallen Angels (Fay Bainter,Estelle Winwood); Truly Valiant 1936; Birthright1933(7); How Come,Lawd? 1937; The Wild Duck 1938; Redhead (GwenVerdon) 1959 – theatre closed and reopened as Cinema but by 1940 theatre was demolished

42nd Street Theatre – 432 West 42nd St.

47th Street Theatre -(home to Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre) – 304
West 47th St. (8th & 9th) (196 seats) Wild Blue; Perfect Crime – transferred To
Duffy Theatre 2nd – 47th Street Theatre (NYC) – Jelly Roll 1995; Last Session
1997

46th Street Theatre – see Richard Rodgers Theatre – 226 West 46th
Street – 1338 seats – opened as Chanin’s Forty-Sixth Street Theatre 1925 and got
present name in 1932 – Good News 1927 (551); DuBarry Was a Lady 1939; Panama
Hattie 1940 (501); Finian’s Rainbow 1947 (725); Arms and the Girl 1950; Guys and
Dolls (Sam Levene,Robert Alda,Isabel Bigsley,Vivian Blaine,Stubby Kaye) 1950
(1194); Damn Yankees 1955; New Girl in Town 1957; Redhead 1959; Christine 1960;
Tenderloin 1960; Donnybrook 1961; How to Succeed in Business Without Really
Trying 1961; Do I Hear a Waltz 1965; I Do I Do 1966 (560); Pousse Café 1966;
1776 – 1969; Raisin 1973; Chicago (Gwen Verdon,Chita Rivera,Jerry Orbach) 1975;
Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Henderson Forsythe) 1978; Working 1978; Nine
1982 (732); Fences 1987 (526);

46 Walker Street – between Church and Broadway

Forum 47th Street – see Central Theatre; Forum Theatre (NYC) – see
Central Theatre; 2nd – Forum Theatre (NYC) – see Vivian Beaumont Theatre; Forum,
Bronx – 1922 – 2,300 seats 1922, prior Triplex; Church

*14th Street Theatre – (see Theatre Francais, Civic Repertory
Theater) – 105-9 West 14th Street & 6th Ave – built 1866 as Theatre Francais
(1100 seats) – changed to Lyceum 1873 – Oct 24, 1881 Tony Pastor originated vaudeville
acts here i.e. Eva Tanguary; Marie Dressler; and from 1886-1926 as Fourteenth
Street – Old Homestead 1887 (160), Blue Jeans 1890 (176); Running For Office (Cohan
family) 1903 (6 weeks) – demolished 1938

*14th Street Y
- 344 East 14th St (between 2nd Ave & 3rd Ave)- home to Hypothetical Theatre
Company

4th Street Theatre – 83 East 4th St



Fourth Unity

Foxwoods Theatre – currently home to Broadway’s SPIDER-MAN Turn Off the Dark, has gone by many names over the past few years- originally changing from the Ford Center for the Performing Arts in 2005, and then from the Hilton Theatre in 2010. The venue is about to go through another change as Live Nation, the current owner, is ‘close to a deal to sell,’ according to the New York Post – formerly Hilton Theater – Reconstructed from the vintage 1903 Lyric and 1920 Apollo music theatres by entrepreneur Garth Drabinsky, the Ford Center for the Performing Arts, on New York’s reinvigorated 42nd Street, is an 1,821-seat theatre with an atmosphere of pure fantasy. Past productions include Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Ragtime: Spider-Man, Turn Off
the Dark (Reeve Carney,Evan Rachel Wood,Alan Cumming) – starts previews October/10
and opening early summer; – theatre being renamed Foxwoods Theatre as of August 10/10 – as of Dec 2012 theatre is for sale – talk of King Kong opening here

Franklin Museum – see Franklin Theatre

Franklin Theatre – 175 Chatham St – 550 seats – 1835 – known as the
Little Drury, then Franlin Museum – opened with School of Reform – closed 1854 –
became furniture store

Frazee Theatre – see Lew M. Fields Theatre and Wallack’s Theatre -
Gold 1921 (6); Dulcy 1921 (246)

Freddy’s – intimate cabaret – Marcia Lewis

Frederick P. Rose Theatre – opening in AOL Time Warner Building – Columbus
Circle – houses the Rose Theatre, 1000 seats, and Allen Room – 470 seat
club-style space

Freehold Theatre – see La Mama

Freeman, Bronx – 1922 – 1,604 seats – Closed

French Casino – see Earl Carroll Theatre (also was Casa Manana,
Folies Bergere) – 7th Avenue & 50th Street – 1930s

French Theatre – see Theatre Francais

Friars Club – members of the New
York Friars Club, famous for their celebrity roasts, gathered MondayJune 14/04
to celebrate its 100th birthday – Founded 1904, club soon had century’s greatest
funnymen as members, like Milton Berle, Buddy Hackett and Pat Cooper – club’s
midtown Manhattan building, known as “the monastery,” has a restaurant, a bar, a
steam room and a barbershop – in 1988, after 84 years, the club allowed women to
join, starting with Liza Minnelli

Fringe Festival – see New York International Fringe Festival

Frohman’s Empire Theatre – see Empire Theatre

Frolic Theatre – see New Amsterdam

Fugazy Theatre – closed & demolished

Fulton Theatre – 1911 built as the Folies Bergere Theatre, and in
1955 became the Helen Hayes Theatre – Yellow Jacket 1912 (80), Twin Beds 1914
(411), Abie’s Irish Rose 1922 (2,327); Jazz Singer (George Jessel) 1925 (303);
Arsenic and Old Lace 1941 (1444); Deep Are the Roots 1945 (477); Another Part of
the Forest (Patricia Neal,Mildred Dunnock,Leo Genn) 1946; Command Decision 1947
(409); Seven Year Itch (Tom Ewell,Vanessa Brown)1952 (1141)

G

Gage and Tollner’s – opened 1879 – famous nightclub at 303 Fulton Street,
Brooklyn – moved in 1892 to 372-374 Fulton Street

Gaiety – built 1908 – 1547 Broadway at 46th Street – 1000 seats –
opened 1908 with The Yankee Prince featuring the entire Cohan family; Gaiety
Burlesque – burlesque house – House Next Door 1909; Fortune Hunter (John
Barrymore) 1909 (345), Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford 1910 (424), Stop Thief 1912
(149); Daddy Long Legs 1914 (264); Turn to the Right 1916 (435), Lightnin 1918
(1291) – Tell Me More (Gershwin) 1925 (12 weeks); Tommy 1927; Peter Pan Flies
High 1931; Collision 1932; 1926 became a movie house until 1931 when it became a
Minsky’s burlesque house renamed Victoria – Ann Corio, Gypsy Rose Lee, Abbott
and Costello – Phil Silvers 1934; Harlem on Broadway 1942 (Stepin Fetchit); 1943
turned to vaudeville and became Victoria and showed films – few blocks up from
George M. Cohan Theatre – 1982 became the Embassy Five with entrance on 46th St
– closed 1980 – demolished in 1982 for Marriott Hotel

Gaiety Burlesque – 201 West 46th St at Broadway – 1920s – 811 seats -
became gay male adult theatre operated from mid 1970s and still open – now closed – formerly
known as the Orpheum Dance Palace, also known as Kings Cinema

Galapagos Art Space – rock club

GAle GAtes et al – Main Street, Brooklyn based avant-garde company -
troupe ceases operations July 2003 – also used DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan
Bridge Overpass) for some performances

Gallery of Modern Art – 2 Columbus Circle – opened 1964 – created by
Huntington Hartford – gallery, restaurant, Gauguin Room, small auditorium in
basement with daily pipe organ recitals – Salvador Dali exhibit – closed 1964 -
renamed New York Cultural Center – temporary shows and nightclub “Cabaret in the
Sky” in penthouse restaurant (Jackie Curtis,Holly Woodlawn,Cherry Vanilla etc) -
1980 purchased by Gulf + Western – donated to city for use by Dept. of Cultural
Affairs – now to be transformed into new home for the Museum of Arts and Design



Gallo Opera House – 254 West 54th St – opened 1927 as a Broadway theatre – 1200 seats – opened
with La Boheme 1927; Electra (Antoinette Perry); Juno and the Paycock; Rainbow
(21) – 1929 renamed the New Yorker – The Vikings 1930; Hummin’ Sam 19331933
became the Casino de Paris – closed in 1935 and reopened as the Palladium in
1936 – 1937 it became the Federal Music Theatre and in 1939 became the New
Yorker again – The Swing Mikado 1939 – transferred to 44th Street Theatre – in
1942 CBS acquired the New Yorker and became Radio Playhouse No 4 and then Studio
No 52 – sold and reopened as the infamous Studio 54 – the marquee still reads
Studio 54 and entertains rock concerts

Garden Theatre – opened 1890 – 61 Madison Avenue at 27th Street -
(1200 seats on the ground floor of Madison Square Garden and for 35 years housed
major productions) – Sarah Bernhardt (in French) (Camille/La
Tosca/Cyrano/Hamlet/L’Aiglon) 1900 (5 weeks); Hamlet (E.H. Sothern) 1900;
College Widow 1904 (278) – 1919 became Jewish (later Yiddish) Art Theatre –
demolished 1925

Garrick Theatre – (see Harrigan’s) – 65-9 West 35th Street built in
1890 as Harrigan’s Theatre – premiered with Arms and the Man – renamed Garrick
in 1895 – Arms and the Man – home of the Theatre Guild – Sherlock Holmes 1899
(256), Secret Service 1896 (176), Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines 1901 (168),
Scarecrow 1911 (23), Her Own Way 1903 (107); from 1917-1919 was Vieux Colombier
– in 1919 reverted to Garrick – John Ferguson 1919 (177); in 1919 it became the
Jewish Art Theatre – Enter Madame 1920 (350); Heartbreak House 1920 (250); He
Who Gets Slapped 1922; The Failures (Jacob Ben-Ami) 1923 (40); Adding Machine
1923 (72), They Knew What They Wanted 1924 (192); Garrick Gaieties (Sterling
Holloway) 1925 (lyric and composer debut of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart) –
demolished 1932

Gaslight Café – 116 MacDougal St – Bob Dylan 1963 – upstairs Kettle of
Fish bar – Bob Dylan – long gone

Gate Theatre – 2nd Avenue – Heloise (Alan Arkin) 1958; O Marry Me
1961; Cindy 1964

Gatehouse Theatre – 135th Street and Convent Avenue – 192-seat theater for
Harlem Stage/Aaron Davis Hall – rugged 1890 building, vacant since 1984 – being
transformed into a brand-new 192-seat performance space for Harlem -

Gem Theatre - closed & demolished

*Gene Frankel Theatre – 24
Bond St. (at Lafayette Street)

Genesius Guild Theatre

George Abbott Theatre – 152 West 54th Street – 1401 seats – opened
1928 as the Craig Theatre – Potipher’s Wife 1928; closed 1931 and changed to
Adelphi in 1934 – One Third of a Nation; It Can’t Happen Here; Sing for Your
Supper – became Truth Center for the Arts, follwed by Yiddish Arts Theatre –
1944 Shuberts took over – On the Town; Three to Make Ready; Street Scene –
became studio – 1958 became Fifty-Fourth Street Theatre and 1966 the George
Abbott – Darling of the Day 1968 – demolished 1970

George M. Cohan’s Theatre – 1911 – 1482 Broadway at 43rd St. – 1100
seats – Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford with George M. Cohan 1911(moved from Gaiety);
The Little Millionaire (with Cohans) 1911; Broadway Jones 1912; Potash and
Perlmutter 1913 (441) It Pays to Advertise 1914; Change Your Luck (Alberta
Hunter) 1930; Shoot the Works (Imogene Coca) 1931; The DuBarry 1932 – 1932
turned to films but struggled with proximity of Roxy, Rialto, Paramount, State,
Rivoli, Strand and others – 1938 demolished for retail stores

George Washington – “23” Room – famous nightclub

Gerald J. Lynch Theater – at John Jay College – 10th Avenue between 58th
and 59th Streets


Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre
– 1,079 seats – name changed May 9/05 from Plymouth – see
Plymouth Theatre – Chita Rivera: Dancer’s Life 2005 (72 perf); Mother_____ With the Hat 2011;

Gerde’s Folk City Club – West 4th & Mercer St – music venue – Bob Dylan
1961 – demolished

Germania Theatre – Broadway & 13th Street – see Wallach’s, Aberle’s
Theatre – Mascot 1882

Gershwin Hotel – Why We Don’t Bomb the Amish 2000

*Gershwin
Theatre
– 1633 Broadway & 50th or 222 West 51st St. (Nederlander-1,933
seats) Built as the Uris in 1972 – on site of old Capitol Movie Palace -
Broadway’s largest theatre– occupies 1st 6 floors 50 story office tower – home
of new Theatre Hall of Fame -Via Galactica 1972 (7); King and I 1977 (revival
807), Seesaw; Sammy Davis Jr.; Andy Williams, Frank Sinatra; Ella Fitzgerald;
Count Basie; Paul Anka; Bing Crosby; Barry Manilow etc. – Sweeney Todd (Len
Cariou,Angela Lansbury) 1979 (557), Pirates of Penzance 1981 (772), – renamed in
honour of George and Ira Gershwin 1983 – Showboat (Elaine Stritch,Rebecca Luker)
1994(revival 951), Tony Awards, Singin’ in the Rain 1985 (367); Starlight
Express (Andrea McArdle) 1987 (761); Candide (Jim Dale) 1997 (103); Men Are From
Mars; Candide (revival Jim Dale,Andrea Martin) 1997 (103); Men Are From
Mars,Women Are From Venus 1997; Wicked (Kristin Chenoweth,Idina Menzel,Carole
Shelley,Norbert Leo Butz,Joel Grey) 2003;

Gilmore’s Garden – see Madison Square Garden

Gilmore’s 63rd Street – see 63rd St. Music Hall, Daly’s 63rd St.
Theatre, Edyth Totten

Gilsey’s Apollo Hall – see New Fifth Avenue Theatre
Ginny’s Supper Club – Harlem jazz venue – across street from former Lenox Lounge

Glen Island Casino – New Rochelle – famous nightclub

*Glines – 240 West 44th Street – 1976-1977 – gay
theatre house – Gulp

Globe Theatre – proposed Elizabeth style theatre for Governor’s Island; or
defunct Castle Williams, a stone fortress built in 1811, and now in a state of
advanced disrepair, as another Globe Theatre (which they, indeed, intend to call
The New Globe Theatre) – a version of Shakespeare’s famous theatrical home that
would employ the old, cylindrical building, which one served as a prison; 2nd
Globe – 1870s had been church – opened as A.T. Stewart’s Athenaeum 1865 – 1881
became New Theatre Comique – name changed frequently; 3rd Globe – (see Lunt
Fontanne and New York Theatre) – 1475 seats – opened with Old Town (Peggy Wood)
1910; Rose Maid 1912; Chin Chin 1914 (295), No No Nanette 1925; Cat and the
Fiddle 1931 (395), – converted to a film house in 1932 – Ring Round the Moon
(Paul Scofield,Claire Bloom,Margaret Rutherford) 1950 (682); 1958 remodelled and
reopened as the Lunt-Fontanne

**Gloria Maddox
Theatre
– 151 West 26th St (between 6th & 7th Aves)- houses T.
Schreiber Studios

Glory Theatre – closed & demolished

Golden – (see John Golden Theatre, Royale Theatre, Theatre Masque) –
Irish and How They Got That Way 1997

Golden Rule Theatre – closed

Good Shepherd Faith Church – Lincoln Centre – Trial of the
Catonsville Nine 1971 (130) – moved to Lyceum for additional 29 performances;
School For Scandal (Kevin Kline,Patti LuPone) 1972

Golden Theatre - see John Golden

Goodwill Theatre – Broad Street – Based on the block between Corliss Avenue and Main Street and Willow
Street and Broad Street, we’re working to renovate the Goodwill Theatre,
the Endicott Johnson Shoes Medical Building and the Municipal Building
to create an area where artists and musicians can live, work and play for
those of us who want to appreciate creativity

Gotham Theatre – 1903 – see Central Theatre – 950 seats – razed 1965

Governor Theatre – closed

Gramercy Arts Theatre – 138 East 27th St. (150) Oldest Off-Broadway
theatre in America – Ernest in Love 1960

**Gramercy
Theater
– 127 East 23rd St. (Union Square)(between Park Ave &
Lexington) (490) – newest Off-Broadway theatre opened June 1998 – originally
built in 1937 as a movie house – houses Roundabout Theatre Company – Hotel Suite
2000 – Gramercy Theatre, beginning 2004, will again serve the legitimate
theatre – for the last year and a half, used by the Museum of Modern Art for
film program, which went homeless when MOMA’s midtown home was closed – to be
rock club – 600 capacity

Grand Central Theatre – closed

Grand Finale – (250 seats) cabaret of the 1970s which featured Chita
Rivera, Wayland Flowers and Madame, Marcia Lewis

Grand Opera House – (see Pike’s) – NW corner of 8th Avenue & 23rd St.
(1,890 seats) – 1868 opened as Pike’s Opera House – 1875 theatre closed – 1869
name changed to Grand – Heroines of Shenandoash 1889 – 1938 became cinema and
demolished 1961

Grand Prospect Hall -
Brooklyn – built 1892 in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn as a “temple of
music and amusement” – featured an opera house, ballroom, roof garden and
speakeasy – home to Crescent Motion Picture Company in 1908 – featured here were
the likes of Enrico Caruso, Sophie Tucker, Lena Horne, Mae West, Sonja Henie,
Bob Hope, Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire – used in the motion pictures Cotton Club
and Prizzi’s Honor

Grand Theatre -
early 1900s – 2100 seats



Grange Theatre – closed

Greater Vitagraph Theatre – motion picture theatre circa 1917 – demolished

Greeley Theatre – 1911 – 1,799 seats – closed & demolished 1944

**Greenwich House
Theatre
– 27 Barrow Street (@ 7th Avenue South)- 99 seats – formerly
house to the Drama Department – Author’s Voice/Imaging Brad 1999; Les Mizrahi
2000 – name changed to Barrow Street Theatre, a new off-Broadway rental space
(up to 199 seats) – as of December, 2003

Greenwich Mews Theatre – Adaptation/Next 1969 (707)

Greenwich Street Circus – renamed Pantheon

Greenwich Street Summer Theatre – see Rickett’s Amphitheatre

**Greenwich Street
Theatre
– 547 Greenwich St. (between Charlton & Vandam) – Villar-Hauser
Theatre Co., Common Ground & Chain Lightning are resident companies – 74 seats
Greenwich Village Comedy Club

Greenwich Village Inn – 5 Sheridan Square – 1920s nightclub

Greenwich Village Theatre – built 1917 – see Provincetown Players – Fantastic Fricasee (1922) – 112 performances;
White Cargo 1923 (686); Desire Under the Elms (Walter Huston) 1924 (208)Fountain
(Walter Huston) 1925 (28); Great God Brown 1926 (271), moved to Garrick Theatre
March 1, 1926, Desire Under the Elms 1924 (208),

Ground Floor Theatre – opens Sept 30/02 – 312 West 11th Street -
around corner from White Horse Tavern – home to Fat Chance Productions

Ground Zero – see also World Trade Center – resident performing arts group
in the facility, will be The Joyce Theater and the Off-Broadway Signature
Theatre Company – the downtown homes for the troupes will be called the Joyce
Theater International Dance Center and the Signature Theatre Center

Group Theatre – (1931-1941) – founded 1931 to create permanent
acting company – first performance House of Connelly 1931 – Elia Kazan with the
theatre in 1935 – ceased production 1940 and disbanded

**Grove
Street Playhouse
– 39 Grove St.@ 7th Avenue (formerly Courtyard
Theatre) (Hudson & Bedford-1 block S. of Christopher West of 7th Ave (77)-
located in a block of brownstones

Grove Street Playhouse – 39 Grove Street (West of Sheridan Square)

Grove Theatre – opened 1804 on Bedlow Street now Madison Street E of
Catherine – later became Covent Garden – lasted only a couple of seasons and
closed 1805

Guild Theatre – 52nd Street West of Broadway- built 1925 – 1,360
seats – opened with Caesar and Cleopatra (Helen Hayes) – was radio playhouse
from 1943 to 1950 and then purchased by American National Theatre and Academy (A.N.T.A.)
and returned to live theatre as the A.N.T.A.; Silver Cord 1926; Juarez and
Maximillian 1926; Garrick Gaities; Major Barbara 1928; Marco Millions 1928;
Mourning Becomes Electra 1931; Too True To Be Good 1932; Biography 1932 -
changed to ANTA in 1950; renamed Virginia in 1981

Guild 50th St – 1938- 450 seats – Gutted; Retail

H

Hackett Theatre – - see Lew M. Fields Theatre – Witching Hour 1907
(212), Salvation Nell 1908 (71),

Hamlet of Bank Street – - 155 Bank Street (Westbeth Artists Complex)
(70) Pandemonium Stage Co-resident company

Hammerstein’s Ballroom/Manhattan
Center
– 311 West 34th Street; 2 – Hammerstein’s Lyric Theatre – built 1895
- between 44th and 45th Streets – demolished 1935; Hammerstein’s Music Hall
(NYC)- – see Olympia; 3 – Hammerstein’s Olympia (NYC)- see Olympia, Criterion –
1895 – 4 theatres in the same building – Broadway between 44th and 45th Streets
(2800 seats) – plus Concert Hall, Lyric Theatre and Roof Garden – later New York
– demolished 1935; 4 – Hammerstein’s Theatre (NYC)- 1697 Broadway at 53rd Street
- 1927 – 1265 seats – opened with Golden Dawn (Cary Grant); Good Boy 1928; Sweet
Adeline 1929 (Helen Morgan); Ballyhoo (W.C.Fields) – 1931 renamed the Manhattan;
then Billy Rose’s Music Hall and then the Manhattan Music Hall, then just the
Manhattan – Murder in the Cathedral 1936 – 1936 CBS took a long lease as Radio
Playhouse No 1, then Television Studio No 50 – home to Ed Sullivan and in 1967
renamed the Ed Sullivan Theatre – now housing the Late Show with David
Letterman; 5 – Hammerstein’s
Victoria
(NYC) – east of Victory Theatre – opened 1895 at Broadway and 44th
St – see Victoria Theatre – 1200 seats – had a roof garden joined to Republic
Theatre – opened 1899 – Reign of Terror 1899; Chris and the Wonderful Lamp
1900; Sweet Adeline 1929 (234) – was the top vaudeville house in the country -
closed 1915 – demolished 1916 – most of building replaced by movie theatre –
Rialto – demolished 1935 – new structure included smaller Rialto movie house –
razed 2002; 6 – Hammerstein’s Theatre Republic – see Theatre Republic

Hampden’s Theatre – see Colonial Theatre – Merchant of Venice
(Walter Hampden,Ethel Barrymore) 1925 (7 weeks);

Harkness Theatre - see Colonial Theatre, New Theatre – rebuilt to
house the Harkness Ballet (1964-1974) under the direction of Rebecca West
Harkness (1915-1982) – Robber Bridegroom (Kevin Kline,Patti LuPone) 1975 (15) -
tranferred to Ethel Barrymore (145); Sweet Bird of Youth; final show there – So
Long 174th Street 1976 – demolished 1977

Harlem Opera House
- 125th Street – closed & demolished

Harlem School of the Arts – see Classical Theatre of Harlem

Harlem Stage

Harmony Theatre – 161 West 22nd
Street (Chelsea) – was home to Upright Citizens Brigade for since 1999 – was a
former burlesque house (74 seats) on November 18/02 theatre was closed by City
building inspector – company used a temporary space at Access Theatre, before
moving to Chelsea Playhouse, 125 West 22nd Street

Harold and Miriam Steinberg
Center for Theatre
– 111 West 46th Street – previously known as the American
Place Theatre – has 425 seat Laura Pels Theatre and 75 seat Black Box Theatre –
opening late 2003

Harold Clurman Theatre – 412 West 42nd Street – may be demolished in
2000 to make room for modern complex containing six new theatres, topped by
apartment tower – only the facade at 410-412 West 42nd Street housing Beckett
and Clurman theatres would be left intact – Samuel Beckett one act plays Ohio
Impromptu,Catastrophe and What Wer (Donald Davis) 1983 (350)

Harold Square Theatre – Arms and the Man 1894;

Harrigan & Hart Theatre – ; 2 – Harrigan’s Park Theatre (NYC) – (see
Garrick Theatre) – 63 West 35th Street – 1890 – see Herold Square Theatre,
Harrigan’s Theatre – demolished 1932; 3 – Harrigan’s Theatre – see Harrigan’s
Park Theatre – 1890 – Ni side of 35th St, just E of 6th Ave – became Garrick
1895 – 1916 slated for demolition but became 1st home of Theatre Guild – 1932
damaged by fire and later demolished

Harris (Candler) Theatre – see also Candler Theatre, Lew M. Fields
Theatre, Sam H. Harris Theatre, and Wallack’s Theatre – 226 West 42nd St –
opened as Candler Theatre, motion picture house 1914 – 1040 seats – Anthony &
Cleopatra (film) 1914 – same year changed to legitimate – On Trial 1914; Lie (C.
Aubrey Smith) 1914 (172); 1916 became Cohan and Harris Theatre; 1921 became Sam
H. Harris Theatre – referred to as the Harris; Hamlet (John Barrymore) 101 perf;
I Loved You Wednesday; Pigeons and People (George M. Cohan) 1933 (70) – razed
1996; Harris Theatre – see Harris Candler Theatre

Havana-Madrid – 1650 Broadway – 1930s nightclub

Haverly’s 14th Street Theatre – see Theatre Francais – 14th St. West
of 6th Avenue (1,283 seats) – Widow Bedott 1880 (56), White Slave 1882 (40),
Peck’s Bad Boy 1884 (40), Galley Slave 1879 (101) demolished

H.C. Miner’s 5th Avenue Theatre – see Fifth Avenue

Heckscher Theatre – 1230 Fifth Avenue – Mama,I Want to Sing 1983;
Mama I Want to Sing Part II 1990

Heights Players

Heights Theatre – closed

Helen Hayes – 240 West 44th St. – (597 seats) – see Times Hall – turns 100 March 12, 2012 -
built in 1912 as the Winthrop Ames Little Theatre, as smallest of the older
Broadway houses, renamed Anne Nichols’ Little Theatre for short time – 597 seats – Pigeon
1912; Let Us Be Gay 1929 (363), First Year 1920 (725), One Sunday Afternoon 1933
(322), Pre-Honeymoon 1935; 1951 leased as studioLong Day’s Journey into Night
1956 (390); Touch of the Poet (Eric Portman,Kim Stanley,Helen Hayes) (1958)
(284); 1963 became Withrop Ames again – Me Nobody Knows 1970 (587); 1974 became
Little Theatre again – Gemini (6/77 to 9/81 – 1,819 performances), Touch of the
Poet (Jason Robards Jr,Geraldine Fitzgerald) 1978; Strider 1979 (27
weeks)Charlie and Algernon 1980 (17); Runner Stumbles, Torch Song Trilogy 1982
(1222); 1983 theatre renamed the Helen Hayes after one on 46th Street demolished
- Romance Romance 1988; Defending the Caveman 1995 (399); Last Night of Ballyhoo
(Paul Rudd) 1997 (557); Band in Berlin 1999; Epic Proportions 1999; Dirty Blonde
(Claudia Shear) (2000); By Jeeves 2001 (72); Xanadu 2008; 39 Steps 2008; -
theatre being purchased by Second Stage who will establish it as permanent home
in 2010; Colin Quinn Long Story Short 2011; -2nd HELEN HAYES -

Helen Hayes
– 1911 – 210 West 46th Street – originally a
theatre/restaurant – see Folies Bergere – opened as the Fulton, 1160 seats, and
later on Helen Hayes in 1955 – first success The Yellow Jacket; Damaged Goods(1
performance, but ran 66 a month later) 1913; Abie’s Irish Rose 1922 –
transferred to larger theatre for long run; Jazz Singer 1925; Last of Mrs.
Cheney 1925; New Faces 1934; 1937-39 leased for film and burlesque – Arsenic and
Old Lace 1941(also transferred to another theatre); Searching Wind (Cornelia
Otis Skinner,Montgomery Clift) 1944 (10 mos); Long Day’s Journey Into Night
(Frederic March,Florence Eldridge,Jason Robards Jr,Bradford Dillman) 1956 (390),
Touch of the Poet 1958 (284), Period of Adjustment (Barbara Baxley,James
Daly,Rosemary Murphy) 1960 (132); Crown Matrimonial, Crucifer of Blood, Duel of
Angels, Mary Mary 1961 (1572); Me Nobody Knows 1970 (587)moved from Off
Broadway, To Live Another Summer,To Pass Another Winter 1971; Perfectly Frank,
Prime of Miss Jean Brodie 1968, Rodgers and Hart, Royal Family – demolished in
1982 along with the Astor, Gaiety, and Morosco, to make way for Marriott Marquis
Hotel

Helen’s Restaurant, Cabaret & Piano Lounge – opening March 2004 – 169
Eighth Avenue

Hellinger – see Mark Hellinger

Henderson’s Music Hall
- situated on Coney Island

Henry Abbey’s Theatre – see Abbey’s Theatre – Broadway and 38th
Street (1893-demolished in 1930 – renamed “Knickerbocker Theatre” in 1896 -
Dearest Enemy 1925 (286)

*Henry
Miller’s Theatre
– - 124 West 43rd Street – 1918 – 1,055 seats – (see Kit
Kat Klub) – opened with The Fountain of Youth 1918; Victoria Regina; Caesar and
Cleopatra; Mis’ Nellie of N’Orleans (4 mos); La La Lucille (Gershwin);
Quarantine (Helen Hayes); Famous Mrs. Fair 1919 (343), La,La,Lucille 1919 (104);
National Anthem (Laurette Taylor,Ralph Morgan) 1922 (114); Vortex 1925 (Noel
Coward); The Play’s The Thing 1926 (260); Journey’s End 1929; Tomorrow and
Tomorrow 1931 (206), The Good Fairy 1931 (Helen Hayes); Personal Appearance 1934
(501); Days Without End 1934 (57); Our Town 1938 (336), National Anthem (Laurette
Taylor)(114); Libel; Tortilla Flat 1938 (5); Our Town (Martha Scott) 1938 (336)
– moved to Morosco); Harriet (377), Janie 1942 (642), Harriet (Helen Hayes) 1943
(377); Dear Ruth 1944 (683), Story of Mary Surratt (Dorothy Gish)1947 (11);
Cocktail Party (Alec Guiness,Irene Worth,Cathleen Nesbitt) 1950 (409); Moon is
Blue 1951 (924), Trip to Bountiful (Lillian Gish,Jo Van Fleet,Eva Marie Saint)
1953 (39); Oh Men Oh Women (Franchot Tone, Anne Jackson,Larry Blyden,Betsy von
Furstenberg,Gig Young) 1953 (48 weeks); Witness for the Prosecution 1954 (645),
Look After Lulu (Tammy Grimes)1959 (5 weeks); Nervous Set 1959; World of Carl
Sandburg (Bette Davis) 1960, Under the Yum Yum Tree; Enter Laughing (Alan Arkin)
1963 (419); Diamond Orchid 1965 (5); 1966 leased to Circle in the Square, then
became porno house – Morning,Noon and Night (Robert Klein) 1968 (52); Affair,
1969 became a cinema – Andy Warhol’s Lonesome Cowboys premiered there – for a
time known as the Park-Miller and Avon-at-the-Hudson, a pornographic film house
for 5 years – in 1978 reopened as Xenon, a discotheque – the space still
survives as a nightclub/discotheque – became Kit Kat Klub for Cabaret (revival)
(Alan Cumming,Natasha Richardson,Mary Louise Wilson) 1998 (still running May
2002); then Henry Miller once again for Urinetown (John Cullum) 2001 – 57-story
skyscraper, New York headquarters of Bank of America to be built on the Avenue
of the Americas between 42nd and 43rd Streets, a site that includes the theater
rebuilt as part of the new building. The original theater, had 950 – when it is
rebuilt its original seating capacity will be restored. (It currently holds
631.) 86-year-old theatre will be back in business in 2008, with largely modern
interior, expanded lobby, improved box office, dressing room area and fly
gallery. Seating capacity will be 900—the original count of the Henry Miller’s
orchestra and mezzanine – Roundabout Theatre Company, which owns or leases
Broadway’s American Airlines Theatre and Studio 54, is in negotiations to add a
third Broadway house to its list – in the final stages of negotiations for a
20-year lease on the Henry Miller Theatre, which is due to reopen Sept 2009,
1,055 seat theatre located behind preserved and restored neo-Georgian facade of
original 1918 theatre with Bye Bye Birdie

*Henry Street
Settlement
– - see Louis Abrons Arts Center – 466 Grand St.- houses
Harry DeJur Playhouse, Experimental Theatre, Recital Hall (100)

Henry Wood’s Marble Hall/Minstrel Hall – 561 Broadway below Spring St –
converted from Jewish Synagogue 1862 – minstrel theatre – (1857-1859) – renamed
Theatre Comique – bldg sold to Merchants & Manufacturers Bank 1859 – theatre
reopened at 514 Broadway near Prince St

Herald Square Theatre – see New Park Theatre

HERE – 145 Sixth Avenue (between Broome & Spring Streets)

*HERE Arts Center - 145 6th
Avenue (south of Spring St. and Dominick)- large building houses two theatres
and performance club – mainstage 99 seats/smaller downstairs seats 74

Hermann’s Gaiety Theatre – see San Francisco Music Hall

Herold Square Theatre – 1331 Bropadway – NW corner of Broadway and
35th Street – 1894 – remodeled the Colosseum Theatre which was built in 1874 –
also known as the Criterion 1882, Harrigan’s Park 1885 and in 1889 the Park
Theatre – rebuilt as Herald Square in 1894 – first success was Arms and the Man
(Richard Mansfield)1894; Parlor March 1896; Heart of Maryland 1895 (229),
Naughty Anthony (Blanche Bates) 1900; Arizona 1900 (140); Road to Yesterday 1906
(216), Widower’s Houses 1907 – converted to vaudeville – damaged by fire in 1908
– demolished 1915

Hickory House – 52nd Street nightclub in 1930s

Hideaway Bar – 1950s nightspot

*Hideaway Cabaret and Supper Club
-
- John Barrymore Room – intimate cabaret and dining establishment -
closed suddenly as of March,2002 – 32 West 37th Street – what was “The John
Barrymore Room” is being renamed “The Julie Wilson Room.”

High Five –

High Spirits Room – 369 West 46th Street – open less than a year, at
St. Famous Bakery closed August 2001 – discontinuing both the retail bakery and
the cabaret room. The building has been sold

Hilton Theatre – new name 2005 for Ford Center for the Performing Arts – 1,830 seats -
Young Frankenstein 2007; see Foxwoods Theatre (renamed Aug 10/10);

Hindenburg Theatre – see Edyth Totten Theatre

Hippodrome -
wood and canvas roofed stadiums at Broadway, 5th Avenue and 23rd Streets -
variety of circus acts – torn down in 1856 for 5th Avenue Hotel

Hippodrome Theatre – 6th Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets -
opened in 1905 with A Yankee Circus on Mars and Andersonville (280 chorus girls
and 480 soldiers and elephants) (120) – (5200 seats plus 800 standing room -
entire block between 43rd and 44th Streets) – ran for 17 years – legendary
theatre which housed spectacles like Society Circus 1905 (596), A Yankee Circus
on Mars 1905; Harry Houdini; Neptune’s Daughter; Better Times 1922 (400), in
1923 became a vaudeville theatre B.F. Keith’s Hippodrome, a cinema – closed 1932
and reopened 1933 as New York Hippodrome – 1925 RKO bought the property and sold
in 1929 – vacant for 5 years – largest theatre of its day – stage 100 feet deep
and over 200 feet long – Billy Rose’s Jumbo (Jimmy Durante) 1935 (233
performances) – closed in 1936 and demolished in 1939 site not developed until
1952
Hippotheatron – 86-94 14th Street – built 1864 – demolished 1872 – Harlequin Bluebird (1864); Mother Goose (1865); Fairy Prince O’Donoughue (1865);

Hirschfield Theatre – see Martin Beck
Hole – 312 Bowery – NY City nightclub

Holiday Theatre – see Central Theatre

Hollywood Cabaret – Broadway & 48th – 1920s nightclub; 2 – Hollywood Club
– 1600 Broadway @ 49th St – 1920s nightclub; 3 – Hollywood/Mark Hellinger – see
Mark Hellinger – 237 West 51st Street; 4 -

Hollywood Theatre – 1655 Broadway and 237 West 51st Street – 1930 –
opened as film theatre and by 1934 presented stage show – Calling All Stars –
Romeo and Juliet (Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh) as 51st Street Theatre – as
Mark Hellinger 1956 My Fair Lady (Rex Harrison,Julie Andrews) (2,717); Jesus
Christ Superstar; Sugar Babies; On a Clear Day You Can See Forever; Coco; Joyful
Noise; 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue; Grind; Rags; Legs Diamond (in 1984 used for
film version of A Chorus Line) – see Mark Hellinger; 5 – Hollywood Twin Cinemas
– closed

*Homegrown
Theatre
– - 2628 Broadway @ 99th St.

Hope Chapel – 720 Broadway – below 8th St – became religious assembly hall
– minstrels took over 1855 and became Kelly and Leon’s (Francis Leon leading
female impersonator of his day)

*Horse Trade
Theatres
– - see Kraine, Red Room and St. Mark’s

Hotel Ambassador Garden – famous nightclub

Hotel Astor Roof – Harry James, Benny Goodman – famous nightclub

Hotel Biltmore – Roof – famous nightclub

Hotel Carlysle – - see Cafe Carlysle

Hotel Dixie – Plantation Room – famous nightclub

Hotel Edison – Green Room – 47th Street – famous nightclub

Hotel Koenig – E. 4th St near First Ave – cabaret performances featuring
drag

Hotel Lexington – Hawaiian Room – famous nightclub

Hotel Lincoln – Blue Room – famous nightclub

Hotel Madison – famous nightclub

Hotel McAlpin – famous nightclub

Hotel Riverview Ballroom – - 113 Jane St.

Hotel Sheraton – Skyline Roof – famous nightclub

Hotel St. Moritz – Café de la Paix – famous nightclub

Hotel Theresa – legendary hotel built 1913 at 125th St and 7th Avenue – closed 1967 – now Starwood Aloft – stars appearing at the famed Apollo stayed here – Fidel Castro, Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, Muhammad Ali and visitors like Malcolm X, Joe Louis, Nikita Khruschchev

House of Candles - – 99 Stanton St.

Howard Gilman Opera House - – see BAM

Hoyt’s Theatre – – see Fifth Avenue Theatre, Madison Square Theatre

*Hudson
Guild Theater
- 441 West 26th St (between 9th & 10th Aves)- 105 seats
in a community centre – On Golden Pond 1978; Madwoman of Central Park West 1979;
No Way to Treat a Lady 1987

Hudson Theatre
- 141 West 44th Street West of 6th Avenue – 1903 – see also Avon Hudson -
entrance on 44th and 45th Streets – 1100 seats – opened with Cousin Kate (Ethel
Barrymore)1903 (6 weeks); Man and Superman 1905; Show Shop 1914 (156); Friendly
Enemies 1918 (440), Clarence (Alfred Lunt,Helen Hayes) 1919 (300); Song and
Dance Man 1923; Wall Street (Sam Levine) 1927; Whispering Friends 1928 (14
weeks); Arsenic and Old Lace (moved from Fulton); 1934 to 1937 used for
broadcasting – Hasty Heart (Richard Basehart) 1945 (207); State of the Union
1945 (765); Detective Story 1949 (581), State of the Union; in 1934 CBS bought
theatre and converted to radio studio – 1937 returned to live theatre – Arsenic
and Old Lace moved here from Fulton Theatre – State of the Union 1945 (765)-
sold to NBC in 1950 and housed the Tonight Show – 1959 the theatre was restored
- Toys in the Attic 1960 (556), Strange Interlude 1963 – theatre dark for 2
years – 1965 This Was Burlesque; How to Be a Jewish Mother 1967 – 1967 theatre
became a porn house until 1975 when it became a double feature theatre – closed
- reopened as The Savoy in 1980 – became part of large hotel and used as
auditorium and conference centre – 101-year-old Hudson Theatre recently
underwent restoration – theatre previously housed 40 plays as well as “The
Tonight Show” with Steve Allen – now available for weddings & social events

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival

Hungerford Music-Hall – – see Gatti’s

Hurrah – Neon Woman (Divine) – 1970s nightspot – demolished

Hurricane Club – 49th Street nightspot – 1940s

Hurtig and Seamon’s New Theatre – 1913 – in 1934 became Apollo

I

*Ibis
Supper Club
– - 321 West 44th St (between 8th & 9th Sts)

Il Campanello – new cabaret venue – 136 West 31st Street

Il Mio – (an Italian “discoteca”)

ImaginAsian Theatre – open

Imperial Music Hall – Broadway and 29th St

Imperial Theatre
– renamed Weber and Fields Music Hall in 1902; 2nd -

Imperial Theatre (NYC)-
- 249 West 45th St. (Shubert-1,439 seats) Opened in
1923 – Mary Jane McKane 1923; Rose Marie 1924 (557); Oh Kay 1926 (256), New Moon
1928 (509), Let Em Eat Cake 1933; Hamlet (Leslie Howard) 1926; On Your Toes (Ray
Bolger) 1936 (315), revival 1983, Leave It To Me 1938 (307); Too Many Girls
1939; Let’s Face It (Danny Kaye,Eve Arden,Vivian Vance,Nanette Fabray) 1941
(547), One Touch of Venus 1943 (567); Song of Norway 1944 (860), Annie Get Your
Gun (Ethel Merman) 1946 (1147), Miss Liberty 1949; Call Me Madam (Ethel Merman)
1950 (644), Peter Pan (Mary Martin) 1950; Wish You Were Here 1952 (598), Silk
Stockings 1955 (478); Most Happy Fella 1956 (676), Jamaica 1957 (558), Destry
Rides Again (Andy Griffith,Delores Gray) 1959 (472); Gypsy 1959 (702), Carnival
1961 (719), Oliver 1963 (774), Fiddler on the Roof 1964 9/64 to 7/72 – 3,242
performances), Zorba 1968; Minnie’s Boys 1970; Two By Two 1970; Pippin (Ben
Vereen,John Rubinstein,Irene Ryan,Jill Clayburgh,Leland Palmer) 1972 (1944),
Lost in the Stars (Brock Peters) 1972 (5 weeks); Chapter Two 1977 (857); They’re
Playing Our Song 1979 (1082), Dreamgirls (Jennifer Holiday) 1981 (1522), Mystery
of Edwin Drood (Betty Buckley,George Rose,Donna Murphy) 1985 (608), Chess 1988
(68); Jerome Robbins’ Broadway (Jason Alexander) 1989 (634), Les Miserables
(opened Mar 12/87 – 6,680 performances); Boy From Oz (Hugh Jackman) 2003;
August: Asage County 2008; Billy Elliot 2010; nice Work If You Can Get It (Matthew Broderick/Kelli O’Hara/Judy Kaye/Estelle Parsons) 2012;
Improvisation – closed
IMUA
Incubator Arts Project – not renewing lease at St. Mark’s Church and clsing July, 2014

*Intar – - 420 West 42nd
St(between 9th & 10th Aves) – may be demolished in 2000 to make room complex
containing six new theatres, topped by apartment tower – only the facade at
410-412 West 42nd Street housing Beckett and Clurman theatres would be left
intact; NYCHPD will develop new homes for Intar Theater and Ensemble Studio
Theater at 10th Avenue between West 51st and West 53rd Streets (March 2003) -
Manhattan’s Latino theatre company, INTAR, which was set to premiere In Paradise
and She Plundered Him, may have to postpone its season after the sudden closure
of the Zipper Factory – finds new home at Cherry Lane Theatre

Interboro, Bronx – 1926 – 1,450 seats -Razed

L’Interdit – disco

International Theatre – built 1903 as Majestic Theatre – 5 Columbus Circle (W 58th & 59th) – 1355 seats – 1911 became Park; 1922 Minsky’s Park Music Hall; became Cosmopolitan 1923; 1934 Theatre of Young America; 1935 Park; 1944 International; 1945 Columbus Circle; International again 1945; NBC leased for studio 1949 – torn down 1954 to allow for wider sidewalks for New York Coliseum;
Sing Out Sweet Land 1944; Alice in Wonderland 1947; Caribbean Carnival 1947;

*Inverse Theater – - New
York Press considers this the city’s best downtown theatre company for 2001

Invictus Theatre Company – new professional troupe devoted to undiscovered
talent

Inwood - 1925 – 1,874 seats – Gutted; Retail

Iridium Jazz Club – 1650
Broadway @ 51st St

*Irish Arts
Center
– - 553 West 51st St (between 10th & 11th Aves)- 99 seats – moving to new premises being built at corner at 11th Avenue between 51st and 52nd Sts – opening end of 2016 in a 1916 building occupied by Cybert Tire – theatre seating will increase from 99 to 199 and will have café for 80-90 persons

**Irish Repertory Theatre – -
132 West 22nd St.(between 6th & 7th Aves)- small building in mixed
residential/office block – Dec/06 $6 million capital campaign to buy its current
home on West 22nd Street

Irondale Ensemble Project – new
Off-Broadway Brooklyn venue to use new home in Fort Greene – Located within
steps of BAM, to be housed within the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church’s
former Sunday school – renovation will include a flexible 168-seat performance
space (capable of a 199-seat expansion) as well as office space – Construction
targeted for completion in July with plans to officially open in the fall of
2008

Irving Place – see Irving Plaza

Irving Plaza Theatre – 118-120 E. 15th St – built 1888 – block off
Union Square – early 1930s Gypsy Rose Lee made her name here – became a
warehouse and was torn down in 1985; 2nd Irving Place Theatre – 17 Irving Plaza near Union Square – Song of Singapore (459 perf) 1991 – Irving Plaza is a 1,200-person ballroom-style music venue at 17 Irving Place and East 15th Street – three-level auditorium has served as Polish Army veterans’ headquarters, Yiddish theatre, burlesque house (ecdysiast Gypsy Rose Lee stripped here), union meeting hall, theatre, and rock venue – balcony noted for gay action

Italian Opera House – – opened 1833 – see National Theatre, Richmond
Hill Theatre – sold at auction 1836 – NW corner of Leonard & Church Sts – became
National Theatre – destroyed by fire 1839 – reopened 1840 – fire again 1841 but
not rebuilt

J

Jack Delaney’s – 72 Grove Street, Sheridan Square – famous nightclub

Jack Dempsey’s – 344 West 46th Street moved from 50th St & 8th Avenue –
1930s nightspot

Jack Lawrence – - 359 West 48th St. – Golden Age

Jack Norworth Theatre – 125 West 48th Street – 1918 – see Bijou, Norworth
- demolished 1951

Jacobs Theatre – see Royale Theatre
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Theater – 120 West 46th (bet. 6th and 7th Avenues) – 500 seats in Jacqueline-Kennedy-Onassis High School – A Jew Grows in Brooklyn – started May 2/12 – hiatus to Oct 11/12;

Jade Cinema – closed & demolished

Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning – - 161-04 Jamaica Ave, Jamaica,
Queens

*Jane Street Theater
– - 113 Jane Street @ Westside Highway – 257 seats – located in Hotel
Riverview at the Hudson River which housed the survivors of the Titanic in 1912
- Hedwig and the Angry Inch 1998 (857); Tick,tick….BOOM 2001

Jan Hus Playhouse – 351 East 74th Street – King of the Whole Damn
World 1962; Athenian Touch 1964; Man With a Load of Mischief 1966; Salvation
1969

Jan Street Theatre – Lifegame 2000

Japanese Garden Theatre – 1914 – 1,579 seats -Exotic-Oriental Razed, 1975
(c.) & demolished

Japan Society

Jardin de Paris – Broadway and 44th Street – 1895 – see Olympia Roof
Garden, also New York
Roof – demolished 1935

Jazz – Jazz at Lincoln Center’s new home on Columbus Circle – three
performance venues, a 140-seat club-like space, Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, used for
smaller concerts – Frederick P. Rose Hall, including the 1,100- to 1,230-seat
Rose Theater, and the Allen Room, a 300- to 600-seat performance space;

Jazz Clubs –

Jazz Gallery- – Picnic on the Battlefield, Sandbox – demolished

Jean Cocteau Repertory -
- disbanded March 2007 – vacated Bouwerie Lane Theatre, its home since 1974 -
company founded 1971

Jean Renoir Cinema – closed

Jefferson Theatre – West 14th Street near 3rd Avenue – razed

Jerome, Bronx – 1926 – 1,660 seats – Church

Jerry Orbach Theater - see Snapple Theater Centre

J.E.T. Theatre – - 134 West 26th St.

Jewel Box Revue – (1944-1967) – began 1939 as Miami gay bar (The Jewel
Box) – revue featuring female impersonators – i.e.
Ray Bourbon – 1960s using
various venues i.e. Apollo Theatre, and smaller theatres named for themselves -
Storme DeLarverie, black woman and former MC, and male impersonator with revue -
forerunner to Cage aux Folles – favourite of black theatre circuit tour

Jewel Box Theatre - (see Workshop Theatre)-Workshop Theater’s Jewel
Box — 312 W. 36th St, 4th Floor

Jewish Art Theatre – see Garden Theatre



Jewish Repertory Theatre
– 316 East 91st Street

Jimmy Kelly’s – 181 Sullivan Street – 1930s nightspot

Jimmy Ryan’s – 52nd Street nightclub – 1940s

Joan Weill Center for Dance – new home 2004 to the Alvin Ailey American
Dance Theater on 55th Street at Ninth Avenue – Since its inception in 1958, the
Ailey company has moved seven times and has often been forced to find additional
space to accommodate the spillover from its main dance company, junior dance
company and school

Jock’s Place – Harlem nightspot – 1930s

Joe’s Pub – -
425 Lafayette Street (between E. 4th Street and Astor Place)- (off Public
Theatre)- cabaret named for Joseph Papp, founder of the Public Theater (of which
it is a part), features “the most wide-ranging array of musical theatrical
talent – David Raksin

John Barrymore Room – - see Hideaway Cabaret

John Golden Theatre – 202 West 58th St – opened in 1926 -804 seats –
1st of 3 named for John Golden – opened with transfer from Little of Two Girls
Wanted 1926 (moved from Little); Strange Interlude (Lynn Fontanne) 1928 (18
months)- in 1935 became Cort’s 58th Street – Few Are Chosen 1935; and in 1936
showed art films as Filmarte specializing in foreign films, and then Fine Arts,
Concert Elysee and Fifty-Eight Street Theatre and then the Concert in 1942 when
stage returned – Of V We Sing 1942 – and in 1943 became the Rock Church – 1946
ABC radio for 2 years – then films as the Elysee and back to ABC for the Dick
Cavett show before being demolished in 1985; 2nd -
John
Golden
- 252 West 45th Street (Shubert-805 seats) named after
theatrical producer – 1927 – built as Theatre Masque – 252 West 45th St – Silver
Cord 1926 (112); Puppets of Passion 1927; Strange Interlude (Lynn Fontanne) 1928
(426); As Husbands Go 1931 (148), Tobacco Road 1933 (3182) – in 1933 became John
Golden – Shadow and Substance (Cedric Hardwicke,Sara Allgood) 1938; Angel Street
1941 (1295), Comedy in Music 1953 (Victor Borge) (849), operated as a film house
from 1940s to early 1950s – Waiting for Godot (E.G.Marshall,Bert Lahr) 1956
(59); Mask and Gown 1957; Party With Betty Comden and Adolph Green 1958; Beyond
the Fringe (Dudley Moore,Peter Cook,Jonathan Miller,Alan Bennett) 1962 (667),
Wrong Way Light Bulb (Barnard Hughes,Claudia McNeil) 1969 (7) ; Shelter 1973;
Words and Music 1974; Dirty Linen/New-Found-Land 1977 (5 months)- home to
Pulitzer Prize winners Gin Game (Jessica Tandy,Hume Cronyn) 1977 (517); Tintypes
1980; Day in Hollywood/Night in Ukraine 1980 (588), Crimes of the Heart 1981
(535), Night Mother (Kathy Bates) 1983 (388); Glengarry Glen Ross 1984 (378),
Gingham Dog, It Had to Be You; Eastern Standard (transferred from Manhattan
Theatre Club) 1989; Master Class (Zoe Caldwell,Audra McDonald) 1995 (601);Much
Ado About Everything (Jackie Mason) 1999 (180); Goat, or Who is Sylvia; Vincent
in Brixton; Avenue Q 2003 Tony Award Best Musical 2004; Driving Miss Daisy 2011;

*John Houseman
– - 450 West 42nd St.(between 9th & 10th)- on Theatre Row is to be
demolished spring 2005 – (287 seats)- houses the Houseman, Studio and Studio Too
- Driving Miss Daisy (Dana Ivey,Morgan Freeman); Broadway Jukebox 1990; Lyndon
(Laurence Luckinbill) 1991; Ethel Merman’s Broadway 1992; Over the River and
Through the Woods 1998; Four Guys Named Jose (moved to Blue Angel) 2000 – as of
2004 Douglas Fairbanks Theatre and John Houseman Theatre are being vacated in
preparation for demolition in May, 2005, final show will be Lazer Vaudeville -
it is likely a large residential tower will go up on the south side of 42nd
Street between Dyer and 10th Avenues – closed

*John Jay College
Theatre
– - 899 10th Avenue (between 58th & 59th Sts)(611 seats)- part
of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York

John Montgomery Theatre – 134 West 26th St.

John Street Theatre (Theatre Royal or Royal Theatre) – lst permanent
playhouse in New York opened in 1767 with Beaux Stratagem – 15-21 John Street
East of Broadway – became Royal Theatre during the war and later New York
Theatre – was the leading theatre for 30 years – 1794 opera house – demolished
after erection of Park Theatre 1797 – Father or American Shandyism 1789, As You
Like It 1786, Contrast 1787; Tammany or Indian Chief 1794, Contrast 1787 – last
used 1798, and later sold

Jolson’s 59th Street Theatre – (see Century Theatre) – 932 Seventh
Avenue @ 58th St – 1921 – opened with Bombo starring Al Jolson 1921; Student
Prince 1924 (608); My Maryland; Moscow Art Theatre 1923; – theatre on 58th
Street with entrance on 7th Avenue – 1700 seats – 1931 turned to films as
Central Park – in 1932 renamed the Shakespeare for 249 performances of his
classics – then the Venice – Africana 1934 (3) then Yiddish Art Players; as the
Venice Theatre 1937 – The Cradle Will Rock 1937 (19 perf before moving); name
changed frequently – Yiddish Art, Molly Picon – Comes a Revelation 1942; and
back to Jolsons by 1943 when the theatre switched to foreign films – 1944 became
the New Century – Follow the Girls (Jackie Gleason) 1944 almost 900 perf), Up in
Central Park, High Button Shoes (Phil Silver); Inside U.S.A. (Bea Lillie);
Venice, Molly Picon – Kiss Me Kate 1948 (1070); Carnival in Flanders (John
Raitt,Dolores Gray) 1953 – closed 1953 and NBC leased in 1954 and theatre was
demolished in 1962 and is now an apartment building; 2nd – Jolson Theatre (NYC)-
see Century Theatre and New Century – Student Prince 1924 (608)

Jonah Theatre – see San Francisco Music Hall

Jones Beach Marine Theatre – open air amphitheatre specializing in
summer musicals – Arabian Nights 1954

Joseph Papp Public Theatre – 425 Lafayette Street – see Public
Theatre

*Jose Quintero
Theatre
– - 534 West 42nd Street(between 10th & 11th Aves) – (93
seats)Kaufman Theatre was rechristened the Jose Quintero on May 2nd, 2000

*Joyce – - 175 8th Avenue at 19th St – major
theatre for dance companies – Season’s Greetings 1985 – being bought by company, formerly just rental space plus anchor tenant for 1,000 seat theatre at World Trade Center

*Judith
Anderson Theatre
– - 422 West 42nd St – Take It Easy 1996;
Valentino-the Musical 1998; Boy’s Life 1998; Summer in Gossensass 1999; -
demolished in 2000 to make room complex containing six new theatres, topped by
apartment tower – only the facade at 410-412 West 42nd Street housing Beckett
and Clurman theatres would be left intact

Judith Shakespeare Company

Judson Church – see Judson Hall and Judson Poets Theaters
Judson Hall Theatre – Prince and the Pauper 1962
<strong?Judson Poets Theatre – headed by Al Carmines – Living Theatre
Judson Studio Players/Judson Gallery Players – Faust 1959; In the First Place 1961; The Great American Desert 1961
Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall - see Carnegie Hall

*Judy’s Chelsea
Cabaret
- – 169 8th Avenue – downtown supper club, Judy’s Chelsea,
which houses a piano bar and cabaret will shut down March 29,2003

Julian Eltinge – see Eltinge

Juliet I & II – closed & demolished

Julie Wilson Room – see Hideaway Cabaret

Julliard Drama Theater- 65th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus
Avenues; 2 – Julliard School
-
- most highly endowed music school in U.S.; 3 – Julliard Theater -
65th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues

K

Kaufman – 534 West 42nd St – see Martin Kaufman and Jose Quintero
Theatre
Kazino – Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812, Dave Malloy’s critically praised “electro-pop opera” based on “War and Peace,” which played an extended Off-Broadway run last fall, will return to New York at Kazino — a new venue created specifically for the show — beginning May 1/13 – new space — a temporary structure that will rise at the corner of West 13th Street and Washington Street, wedged between The High Line and The Standard Hotel in the heart of New York’s meatpacking area

Keith & Albee – see Palmer’s Union Square

Keith’s Colonial – see Colonial Theatre

Kelly & Leon’s – see Hope Chapel, Lina Edward’s Theatre – Broadway below
Waverly Place

Kelly’s Stable – 6th Avenue & 52nd St – 1940s nightclub

Kentucky Club – nightclub on West 49th Street between 7th and
Broadway – Duke Ellington – later became Hollywood Club – 1920s

Kew Gardens Cinema – built as Austin Theatre – Lefferts Blvd near Queen’s
Blvd

KGB Theatre – 85 East 4th St.

King Kong Room – new supper
club and cabaret – 240 West 47th Street – closed as of Jan 12/04 – Cabaret in
Manhattan has faced a lot of closures – King Kong Room, Firebird Room, Arci’s
Place, Judy’s and Rainbow & Stars

Kings Cinema – became porn house – see also Gaiety Burlesque

Kings Theatre – Flatbush Avenue, Flatbush, Brooklyn – 1929 – talk of
restoration – now shuttered

Kirk Theatre – Theatre Row, 42nd St

Kit Kat Club – 152 East 55th Street – 1930s nightspot

Kit Kat Klub – (also known as Club Expo) – the original Henry
Miller’s Theatre – Cabaret – moved to Studio 54 (2,378)

Klaw Theatre – 251-7 West 45th Street – opened 1921 with Nice People
(Katharine Cornell and Tallulah Bankhead) 1921 (247) – 806 seats – few doors down from where Irving Berlin was building the Music Box Theatre the same year. The Imperial would snuggle its entrance arcade between them in 1925, though the main performing space is on 46th Street – renamed the
Avon in 1929 – Hell Bent for Heaven 1924 (122), 1925-1926 Theatre Guild – Lilies
of the Field (169), Meet the Wife (232)- renamed in 1929 to the Avon – Strictly
Dishonorable 1929(557); Gypsy 1929 (2 months) – 1934 theatre leased to CBS and
renamed CBS Radio Playhouse No. 2 – 1954 theatre was demolished and is now a
parking garage demolished in 1954 – site is now called Champion Park parking garage, with its frequently used cut-through to 46th Street

Knickerbocker Theatre - see Henry Abbey’s Theatre and Miners’ Bowery
Theatre, also Abbey’s – 1396 Broadway at 38th Street – opened as Abbey’s Theatre
in 1893 with Becket (Irving and Ellen Terry) – 1896 became the Knickerbocker -
Toreador 1902 (146); Mam’selle Napoleon (Anna Held) 1903 (43); Red Mill 1906
(274), Mlle. Modiste 1905 (202), Yankee Prince (featuring 4 Cohans) 1908 (28);
Kismet 1911 (184), Crinoline Girl (Julian Eltinge) 1914 (11 weeks); Girl From
Utah 1914 (Jerome Kern); Lillies of the Field 1921 (169); Meet the Wife
(Humphrey Bogart,Clifton Webb) (232); Hell Bent for Heaven 1923; Androcles and
the Lion; Dearest Enemy (Rodgers and Hart) 1925 (286), as the Avon Strictly
Dishonorable 1928 (557); Hay Fever; Wives of Henry VIII; Christian 1898 (160)-
demolished 1930; 2nd Knickerbocker – Bowery Theatre called Knickerbocker for a
short time in 1844

Knitting Factory – - Alterknit Theatre – 74 Leonard St. – has been
celebrating noise and eclecticism since it opened on East Houston Street in
1987, and in its earlier days the club gained a wide reputation as a defining
stage of downtown music, that clamorous and unclassifiable New York amalgam of
jazz, punk, art-rock and experimental new music – But eventually, gentrification
came to claim the arty Manhattan outpost, and on December 31/08 the last show in
the TriBeCa building that has been its home for the last 14 years. In May it is
to reopen in a considerably smaller and less expensive space in Williamsburg,
Brooklyn

Koch Theater

Koster and Bial’s Music Hall – West 23rd and Avenue of Americas –
originally Bryant’s Opera House – minstrel theatre – reopened 1879 – closed 1893
when Koster and Bial moved to their New Music Hall on 34th Street, which had
opened in 1892 by Oscar Hammerstein as Manhattan Opera House – theatre closed
1901 – - for brief time New York’s most prestigious vaudeville house -
demolished in 1901 for Macy’s Department Store; Their former music hall reopened
as Bon Ton and was demolished 1924

*Kraine Theatre
– 85 East 4th St.(between Bowery & 2nd Aves) (74-99) (Steppin’ Out
Productions residence since 1996)- founded 1998 and houses Kraine/Red Room and
St. Marks (40 seats); New York Theatre Workshop, La Mama E.T.C. and a number of
other theatre spaces including the Kraine Theatre and Red Room complex will soon
see their Off-Off Broadway block become the East Fourth Street Cultural
District; Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) plan to give
six buildings to the arts organizations which currently reside in them. (East
Fourth Street is nestled within the Cooper Square area – which lays between
Bowery and First Avenue, bordered by 14th Street to the north and Delancey to
the south.)

Krause’s Music Hall – 34th Street – renamed to Savoy

L

Labor Stage (NTC) – see Princess Theatre , 48th St Theatre – Pins
and Needles 1937 (1108)

La Casina – 160th Street nightspot in 1930s

La Conga – 57 West 57th Street – 1930s nightclub

La Conga Club – 51st Street & Broadway – 1950s nightspot

La Dom – downstairs from Electric Circus; run by Andy Warhol

LaFayette Amphitheatre – see LaFayette Theatre – 1914 – 2,000 seats
- prior Church; 2nd – LaFayette Theatre – 227th Street – 1910s; 2nd LaFayette -
opened 1825 as the LaFayette Amphitheatre – changed to Theatre in 1827 – Laurens
St near Canal St – elaborate equestrian shows – destroyed by fire 1829 and was
not rebuilt; 3rd LaFayette – 7th Avenue and 132nd St – (House Beautiful) – most
pretigious of Harlem’s theaters – built 1912 – along with the Apollo, a
vaudeville house, most famous theatres in Harlem – in 1930s became Harlem Center
for the Federal Theater – for awhile was a church- burned in 1968 – Androcles
and the Lion (A Negro Production) 1937

Laff Movie Theatre – see Eltinge 42nd Street Theatre

La Guardia Concert Hall – West 65th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam
Avenue; 2 – La Guardia Drama Theater – West 65th Street between Broadway and
Amsterdam Avenue

Lake George Opera Company – founded 1962

*LaMaMa ETC/La Mama Experimental Theatre
Club
- opened 1961 as Café La Mama – 74A East 4th St. (between 2nd &
3rd Aves) – 4 performance spaces (74) (99)and a Club – Carmilla 1972; New York
Theatre Workshop, La Mama E.T.C. and a number of other theatre spaces including
the Kraine Theatre and Red Room complex will soon see their Off-Off Broadway
block become the East Fourth Street Cultural District; Department of Housing
Preservation and Development (HPD) plan to give six buildings to the arts
organizations which currently reside in them. (East Fourth Street is nestled
within the Cooper Square area – which lays between Bowery and First Avenue,
bordered by 14th Street to the north and Delancey to the south.) – Hair
originated here 1967

La Martinque – famous 1950s New York nightclub – Danny Thomas

*Lambs
- 130 West 44th Street (349 seats)(between Broadway & 6th Ave) – 1904 – one
of the largest off-B’Way theatres – has a long theatre history. Rodgers and
Hammerstein wrote Oklahoma! there. Members of the Lamb’s Club, for which the
building was erected, included Fred Astaire, Irving Berlin, Alan J. Lerner and
Bert Lahr. More recently, the structure’s theatre housed such favorites as A
Room of One’s Own, Painting Churches and jon & jenCotton Patch Gospel 1981;
Gifts of the Magi 1990; John and Jen 1995; On May 31/06, the Lamb’s Theatre
Company, received eviction notice – Company plans to find a new space – Church
of the Nazarene bought the building in 1973 to use as a mission – edifice had
originally been built in 1904 as a home for the Lambs, a theatrical club modeled
after a similar one in England. The London club was founded in 1869 – club originally met at Delmonico’s restaurant on
14th Street, then rented quarters on W. 26th Street – Lambs is currently
situated at 3 W. 51st Street – once housed the New York branch of the once famed Lamb’s Club theatrical fraternity — reopened after years of construction as The Chatwal, a luxe hotel. On the ground and second floors are a high-end restaurant and bar called the Lambs Club (actual Lamb’s Club organization still exists, but it is located on East 51st Street.); Lamb’s Club was founded in London in 1869; ; the American version arrived in 1874. Every important American actor and writer was once a member of the American branch of the Lamb’s, including Irving Berlin, Fred Astaire, Bert Lahr, David Belasco, Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers, Charlie Chaplin, Jack and Lionel Barrymore and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Composing team Alan J. Lerner and Frederick Loewe reportedly met at the Lamb’s – closed 2007 and later demolished;

Lane Theatre – 1,416 seats – Razed

Lark Theatre – Lark Play Development Center is moving to new digs in January. 2011, facilitating a shift to the theater district from its current offices near Columbus Circle; Newly redesigned and remodeled space will include offices, two studios (for rehearsals or performances), a lobby and a library. Facility will take up two floors in the building housing the offices of Manhattan Theater Club, Second Stage Theater and the Mint

La Rue – 45 East 58th Street – 1930s nightclub

Last Minute Productions (LMP)- uses various venues – Maverick Theatre

Latin Quarter – 200 West 48th Street – at Broadway – 1933 – infamous
New York nightclub – Frank Sinatra; Milton Berle; Sophie Tucker; DeCastro
Sisters – featured acts from Paris’ Lido – 1940s nightspot – was also known as
Palais Royal, Connie’s Inn, Cotton Club, 22 Steps, and Princess until 1990
Laugh Lounge – closed
Laura Keene’s Theatre – 1856 (1800 seats); 2nd – Laura Keene’s
Varieties (NYC) – see Olympic Theatre, Tripler Hall – moved to 622 Broadway,
just above Houston 1856 – later became Olympic Theatre – Humpty Dumpty 1868 (463
perf) – broke record of Black Crook – demolished 1880

Laura Pels Theatre -
1514 Broadway at 45th (425 seats)- see also Roundabout Theatre and Harold and
Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre (originally American Place Theatre) – also
houses Black Box Theatre – Grace and Glorie (Estelle Parsons,Lucie Arnaz) 1996;
(134); Mineola Twins (Swoosie Kurtz) 1999; The Foreigner (Matthew Broderick)
2004; Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore 2011;

*Laurie
Beechman Theatre
- 407 West 42nd Street (9th Avenue – Hell’s Kitchen) – reopened 2006 – cabaret

La Vie en Rose – became NY Basin St. East

LCT3 (Claire Tow) – to open at Lincoln Center’s Upper
West Side campus near the Library for the Performing Arts – 112 seat theatre99 seats – For the
first three seasons, though, LCT3 work will be presented off-site, i.e. -
“Clay”; second LCT3 production, yet to be selected, is planned for early 2009

League of American Theatres and Producers – founded 1930 as League of New
York Theatres – present name adopted 1985

League of Historic American Theatres – founded 1977 – to promote
preservation and use of historic auditoriums

League of Resident Theatres – founded 1965

Leblang’s Ticket Office – situated in basement of Grey’s Drug Store on
Broadway between 42nd and 43rd Streets – ran until shortly after WWII – during
1920s – up to 3,000 discounted seats a night were sold – forerunner of TKTS
organization

Lee Strasburg Theatre Institute

LeFrak Theatre – open

Lenox Club – 144th Street – next to Cotton Club – 1920s

Lenox Hill Playhouse - since 1949 Equity Library Theatre has operated its
own theatre – first at Lenox Hill Playhouse and later at other auditoriums
Lenox Lounge – Lenox Avenue and 125th St – born 1939 – opened 1942 – closing Dec 31/12 but reopening next year under new owner – Great jazz legends like Billie Holiday, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra and John Coltrane once filled infamous Zebra Room

Leon & Eddies – 33 West 52nd St – nightclub

Leon and Kelly Minstrel Company – The Great Leon – early 1880s

LeRoy’s – 135th Street – 1910s nightclub

Le Ruban Bleu – 4 East 56th St – 1930s nightspot

Lesser America – new theatre company formed 2010 – venue to be Theatre for the New City

Lew Fields 44th Street – rooftop theatre – see Weber & Fields Music
Hall; 2nd – Lew M. Fields Theatre (NYC) – 254 West 42nd St – 1904 – 770 seats –
opened with It Happened in Nordland with Lew M. Fields – music by Victor Herbert
1904; Chorus Lady 1906 (8 mos); renamed Hackett Theatre in 1906 – Maggie Pepper;
The Riddlein 1911 became the Harris – in 1920 became the Frazee – reopened as
Wallack’s in 1924 – Sapho 1900 (29 perf. – reopened and played 55 more);
Disraeli 1911 (280); Lie 1914 (172); Under Sentence (Edward G. Robinson,Thomas
Mitchell,Frank Morgan) 1916; he Woman of Bronze 1920; Dulcy 1921 (Lynn Fontanne
& Howard Lindsay); Shipwrecked 1924; Hell’s Bells 1921 (Shirley Booth, Humphrey
Bogart); Laugh That Off 1930 (262) Shirley Booth; Find the Fox 1930 – 1930
became a film house – 1940 renamed the Anco Cinema and remodelled – 1988
interior gutted and converted into retail space

Lexington Avenue Opera House – 2418 seats – 1923 Marcus Loew purchased
Lexington Avenue Opera House, which was built by the late Oscar Hammerstein -
Loew turned this theatre into a motion picture house – closed & demolished

Lexington Hotel – Hawaii Room – Lexington & 48th Street – 1940s nightspot

Liberal Club – offshoot of Washington Square Players

Liberty Inn – 1920s nightclub

Liberty Theatre – 234 West 42nd St. – built 1904 – 1054 seats -
entrances on 41st and 42nd Streets – opened with Gus and Max Rogers in Rogers
Brothers in Paris 1904 (moved from New Amsterdam); Little Johnny Jones (George
M. Cohan) 1904, Education of Mr. Pipp 1905 (10 weeks); Polly of the Circus 1907;
Wildfire 1908; Fascinating Widow 1911; Elevating a Husband (Edward Everett
Horton) 1912 (120); Milestones 1912; Purple Road (Valli Valli) 1913; Going Up
1917 (351); George White’s Scandals 1918; Hitchy-Koo of 1919 (Cole Porter);
Night Boat (Jerome Kern 1920; George White’s Scandals 1921; To The Ladies 1922
(128), Little Nellie Kelly 1922; Gershwin’s Lady Be Good (Fred & Adele
Astaire)1924 (330), Tip Toes (Jeanette MacDonald) 1925 (194), Blackbirds of 1928
(Bill Robinson) (518), Brown Buddies 1930s; Have a Heart, Night Boat, George
White’s Scandals; Masks and Faces – by 1932 it turned to vaudeville and movies
for 50 years – The Waste Land 1996 (limited run) – current plans call Liberty to
be gutted – tenants to include Madame Tussaud’s wax museum and 26-screen
American MultiCinemas (AMC) movie theater – new entertainment and retail complex
has also restored the historic facades of the Liberty and Empire Theaters

Liberty Theatres – huge, temporary wooden auditoriums, erected during WWI
– touring companies of Broadway shows or vaudeville would perform for soldiers

Lido Club – 160 West 146th Street – 1930s nightspot

Lido East – closed & demolished

Lido Theatre – closed
Limelight – West 20th St – opened 1983 – former Episcopal Church of the Holy Communion built 1844 – 2003 became Avalon – closed 2007
Lina Edward’s Theatre – formerly Kelly & Leon’s

*Lincoln Centre for the
Performing Arts
– opened 1964 – housing
New York State Theatre – 1964 -
and City Center of Music and Drama – now David H. Koch Theater – 2,713 seats;
Metropolitan Opera – 3,900 seats;
Alice Tully Hall – 1,095 seats; Rose Theater – 1,094 seat concert hall and Allen Room – 508 seats;
Avery Fisher Hall – 1962 – formerly Philharmonic Hall – 2,738 seats
Julliard School, Walter Reede Theatre – 268 seats, Clark Studio Theatre – 120 seats, New York Public
Library for the Performing Arts with Bruno Walter Auditorium and Lincoln Centre Theatre comprised of the Vivian
Beaumont Theatre – 1965 (1,080 seats), and the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theatre (299 seats)- originally The Forum -
Kismet (Alfred Drake) 1965; Chippy 1994; Contact 1999; Claire Tow Theater – 268 seats;

1985-86
Prairie Du Chien/The Shawl
The House of Blue Leaves
Juggling & Cheap Theatrics
Spalding Gray

1986-87
Spalding Gray
Asinamali!
Bopha!
Asazi/Gangsters
Born in the RSA
The Transposed Heads
Bodies, Rest, and Motion
Danger: Memory!

1987-88
The Regard of Flight
Sarafina!
National Theatre of the Deaf
Boys’ Life
I’ll Go On
Road (at La MaMa)

1988-89
Waiting for Godot
Measure for Measure
Ubu

1989-90
Oh, Hell
Some American Abroad
Six Degrees of Separation

1990-91
Monster in a Box
Mr. Gogol and Mr. Preen

1991-92
The Substance of Fire

1992-93
The Sisters Rosensweig
Playboy of the Western World

1993-94
The Lights
Hello Again
SubUrbia

1994-95
Hapgood
Twelve Dreams

1995-96
Northeast Local
A Fair Country

1996-97
God’s Heart

1997-98
Pride’s Crossing
A New Brain

1988-89
Far East
Ancestral Voices

1999-2000
Contact
Ancestral Voices
Time of the Cuckoo
Spinning into Butter

2000-01
Spinning into Butter
Old Money
Ten Unknowns
Chaucer in Rome

2001-02
Everett Beekin
Carpetbagger’s Children

2002-03
A Man of No Importance
Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme
Elegies: A Song Cycle
A Bad Friend

2003-04
Nothing But the Truth
Big Bill
Barbara Cook

2004-05
Belle Epoque
Dessa Rose

2005-06
Third
Bernarda Alba
The House in Town

2006-07
The Clean House
Dying City

2007-08
The Glorious Ones
John Lithgow: Stories by Heart
The New Century

2008-09
Clay (LCT3)
Saturn Returns
Happiness
John Lithgow: Stories by Heart

2009-10
Stunning (LCT3)
Broke-ology
What Once We Felt (LCT3)
When the Rain Stops Falling



Lincoln Hotel – Blue Room – 1940s nightspot

Lincoln Plaza Cinemas –open – Broadway between 62nd and 63rd St

Lincoln Royal Gardens – 31st Street nightspot

Lincoln Square Studio Theatre – 218 West 64th Street

Lincoln Square Theatre
– 250 West 65th Street at Broadway – 1906 – 1600 seats – later became
vaudeville – 1909 showed films – demolished 1960s for construction of Lincoln
Centre

Lincoln Theatre – 1926 – 830 seats – closed – now church

Linda Gross Theatre – see Atlantic Theatre Co.

Lion Theatre – 410 West 42nd Street (Theatre Row) – Pageant in Exile
1977

Little Carnegie Cinema – 1952 – 560 seats

Little Carnegie Playhouse – closed & demolished

Little Church Around the Corner (Protestant-Episcopal Church of the
Transfiguration)
– 1 E. 29th Street – popular for theatrical weddings and
funerals

Little Club – 70 East 55th St – opened 1947 – Doris Day

Little Drury – see Franklin Theatre

Little Lenox Theatre – closed

Little Met – see Princess Theatre

Little Old New York – 120 East 14th Street – 1930s nightspot

Little Picture House – closed & demolished

Little Shubert Theatre – 422 West 42nd Street (between 9th and 10th)
– 499 seats – opens November 26,2002 with Tommy Tune:White Tie and Tails

Little Theatre – 1912 (299 seats) – 240 West 44th Street between
Broadway and 8th Avenue – first year productions included Anatol (John
Barrymore); Prunella; Philanderer; Truth; First Year 1920 (760); 1964 changed to
Winthrop Ames and back to Little 1965 – later became the Helen Hayes – Gemini
1977 (1,789)

Living Theatre – off
Broadway group founded 1947 and formed in 1951 by Judith Melina and Julian Beck & Clinton Street Theatre – Judith Melina – used Cherry Lane
Theatre – from 1954-56 performed in lift at Broadway & 100th Street – 1959
opened theatre with 162 seats at 14th and Sixth Avenue – Dr. Faustus Lights the
Lights; Connection 1959 (722); Red Eye of Love 1961 (169); Mann Ist Mann 1962
(175) – 1963 they were evicted and toured Europe – new permanent home 19-21
Clinton St – 100 seats – opening with The Brig 2007 -officially closed down 2013 – see various theatres, i.e. Theatre Genesis, Caffee Cino, Judson Poets Theatre, Judson Church, Judson Studio Players, Open Theatre, now all long gone

Loew’s American Theatre – Atmospheric style – closed & demolished – see
American Theatre

Loew’s Astor Plaza – 1974 to present – 1515 Broadway – 1400 seats

Loews Avenue B – closed & demolished

Loew’s Burland, Bronx – 1916 – 1,817 seats – Supermarket

Loews Canal – 1927 – 2379 seats – closed

Loew’s Cineplex Lincoln Square – Broadway and 6th Street

Loews Columbus Circle – closed & demolished

Loews Commodore Theatre – 1926 – Fillmore – 2830 seats – closed &
demolished 2000

Loews Delancey – 1912 – 1788 seats – gutted – retail

Loews 84th Steet Theatre – open

Loews 83rd St – 1923 – 2633 seats – razed

Loews 86th Steet Theatre – closed & demolished

Loews 83rd Steet – closed & demolished

Loew’s Elsmere, Bronx 1914 – 1,542 seats – Razed, 2005

Loew’s E-Walk Theatre – 42nd Street multiplex – 1999 – 13 screens – 3500
seats

Loew’s Fairmont, Bronx 1928 – 2,559 seats – Part gutted, retail

Loews 42nd Street – closed & demolished

Loews 42nd Steet E-Walk Theatre – open

Loew’s 46th Street Theatre – Brooklyn – Atmospheric style – closed

Loew’s Grand, Bronx 2,472 seats – Gutted; Retail

Loew’s Herald Square Theatre

Loew’s Imax Theatre – 1998 Broadway (68th Street) – cineplex plus giant
screen

Loews Inwood Theatre – closed
Loews King’s Theatre – one of Loew’s Wonder Theatres in NY and NJ – 1025 Flatbush Ave – 3,600 seats – ornate 1929 Flatbush movie house where Barbra
Streisand once ushered – closed 1977 – now venue for concerts – being renovated to reopen 2015

Loews Kips BayTheatre – open

Loew’s Lexington Theatre – 1914 – see Lexington Avenue Opera House – 3100
seats – closed & demolished 1962

Loew’s Lincoln Square – 1998 Broadway @ 68th St – 1994 – 4200 seats –
closed & demolished

Loews Lincoln Square 12 and the Loews IMAX – open

Loew’s National, Bronx – 1910 – 2,397 seats – Razed, 1970s

Loews New York Theatre and Roof – 1895 – 2800 seats – closed & demolished
1935

Loew’s 167th St., Bronx – 1928 – 2,600 seats – Razed

Loews 19th Street East 6 – open

Loew’s 175th Street – built 1930 by Thomas W. Lamb (3,565 seats) -
still in existence, being used as a church (Ike’s United), and most of the
elaborate details are still intact

Loews 175th Street– 1930 – 4140 Broadway between 175th & 176th Sts, Washington Heights – one of Loew’s Wonder Theatres in NY and NJ – movie palace – 3,400 seats
- closed but used for services and occasional rock concert – being considered for 2011 Tony Awards, but Beacon won out – now United Palace

Loews 116th St- 1933 – 1009 seatsnow church

Loews Orpheum – closed & demolished

Loew’s Paradise – 188th Street, Bronx – 1929 – one of Loew’s Wonder Theatres in NY and NJ – 3,845 seats -
Atmospheric – talk of restoration but nothing materialized – closed 1994 – restored 2000

Loew’s Pitkin Theatre – Brooklyn – Atmospheric style – closed

Loews Rio – 1920 – 2603 seats – closed – gutted – retail

Loew’s 72nd Street – built in 1932 by Thomas W. Lamb & Eberson
(3,200 seats) – Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

Loews 72nd Street East – 1932 – atmospheric – razed

Loew’s 7th Avenue – 124th Street – 1910 – 1606 seats – church

Loews Sheridan – closed & demolished

Loew’s Spooner, Bronx 1910 – 1,809 seats – Gutted; Retail

Loew’s State Theatre – 1921 to present – opened a block south of the
Palace in Times Square – 3,450 seats – appearances by W.C. Fields, David
Warfield, Frank Fay, Rudy Vallee and others – see also State Theatre – currently
in basement of Virgin megastore as Loews State Theatre 4 (closed) razed 1989

Loews 34th Steet – open

Loews 34th Street Showplace – closed & demolished

Loew’s Valencia Theatre – Queens – 1929 – one of Loew’s Wonder Theatres in NY and NJ – Atmospheric style – closed – now Tabernacle of Prayer

Loew’s Victoria Theatre – West 125th Street – 2,394 seats – built 1917 by
Thomas W. Lamb – as vaudeville and movie palace – neighbour to the more famous
Apollo Theatre – became 5 screen multiplex in 1987 and closed in 1989 – several
developers are currently interested in renovating the theatre, and hopefully
restoring the theatre to its original glory

Loew’s Victory, Bronx – 1910 – 1,772 seats – Razed

Log Cabin – Harlem nightspot of 1920s

Loft – opened 1970

London Theatre – old burlesque house in the Houston district

*Longacre
– 220 West 48th Street just off Broadway – (1,069 seats) – 1913 – Are
You a Crook 1913; Great Lover 1915 (245), Nothing But the Truth 1916 (332),
Leave It To Jane 1917; Adam and Eva 1919 (312), Butter and Egg Man 1925 (243),
Overture (Pat O’Brien) (41); Waiting For Lefty 1935 (168); Seige 1937 (6);
Mornings at Seven 1939 (44), On Borrowed Time 1938 (321) – 1944 turned to
broadcasting until 1953 – Mademoiselle Columbe, Lark, Little Moon of Alban,
Belle of Amherst 1976 (15 weeks) (all Julie Harris vehicles); Pleasure of His
Company 1958 (474), Slapstick Tragedy (Kate Reid,Margaret Leighton)(7); Mark
Twain Tonight (Hal Holbrook)1966 (9 weeks); I Never Sang for My Father 1968;
Ritz 1975 (400), Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel (Al Pacino) 1977 (363); Ain’t
Misbehavin’ (Nell Carter,Ken Page, Andre DeShields)1978 (1604)- moved from
Manhattan Theatre Club; Children of a Lesser God 1980 (887); Sign in Sidney
Brustein’s Window; I Never Sang For My Father, My Sweet Charlie, Passion, Trip
Back Down; Cuba and His Teddy Bear (Robert DeNiro) 1986 (53); Medea (Diana Rigg)
1994 (82); Gershwins’ Fascinating Rhythm 1999 (17); Taller Than a Dwarf (Matthew
Broderick,Parker Posey) 2000 (56); Def Poetry Jam 2002 (198); Oldest Living
Confederate Widow Tells All (Ellen Burstyn) 2003 (1) – renovated 2008;Boeing
Boeing (revival) 2008; La Cage aux Folles 2010;

Louis Martins – Café de l’Opera – Broadway & 42nd nightspot – 1900s

Lower East Side Club – rock club

Luchows – 110 East 14th Street – 1882 – famous nightclub

Lucille La Verne Theatre – see Princess Theatre

*Lucille Lortel
Theatre
– 121 Christopher St (between Hudson & Bleeker Sts) – 299
seats – changed from Theatre De Lys – original productions – Cloud 9; Eden; Life
in the Theatre; Gertrude Stein and a Companion (Jan Miner,Marian Seldes) 1986
(54); Steel Magnolias 1987 (817); Top Girls (299); Destiny of Me/Normal Heart
(Piper Laurie) 1992 (175); As Bees in Honey Drown 1997; If Love Were All
(Twiggy) 1999; Suite in Two Keys (Hayley Mills,Judith Ivey,Paxton Whitehead)
2000

Lucky StarTheatre – closed & demolished

Lucy Rushton’s Theatre – see New York Theatre, New Theatre Comique –
Broadway above Waverly Place

Luna Lounge – rock club – Williamsburg – 300-350 capacity – formerly on
Lundlow St

*Lunt-Fontanne
– 205 West 46th St. (Nederlander-1,529 seats) Opened in 1910 as the
Globe Theatre – Old Town 1910; Ziegfeld Follies 1921; George White’s Scandals
1922 and 1923 – due to depression it ran as a cinema from 1932 to 1957 – renamed
in 1958 Lunt-Fontanne to honour Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne – 1714 seats -
recently renovated – No No Nanette 1925 (321), Cat and the Fiddle 1931 –showed
films in 1940s as The Globe – The Visit 1958 (featuring Alfred Lunt and Lynn
Fontanne); Goldilocks (Elaine Stritch) 1958 (161); Sound of Music (Mary
Martin,Theodore Bikel) 1959 (original 1443), Little Me 1962 (257); Ben Franklin
in Paris 1964; Skyscraper 1965, Walking Happy 1966, How Now Dow Jones 1967, You
Know I Can’t Hear You…; Her First Roman 1968; Look to the Lilies 1970;
Rothchilds 1970 (507), Rex 1976; Paul Robeson (James Earl Jones) 1978; Peter Pan
1979 (revival Sandy Duncan) (551), Sophisticated Ladies 1981 (767),
Uptown…It’s Hot 1986; Smile 1986; Catskills on Broadway (Marilyn Michaels)
1991; Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public 1994 (16); Hello Dolly 1995 – revival
with Carol Channing (188); Titanic 1997 (804); Night Must Fall (Matthew
Broderick) 1999; Little Mermaid 2008; Adams Family 2010; Ghost, the Musical (2012);

Luxor, Bronx – 1923 – 1,542 seats – Exotic-Egyptian – Liquor Store

Lyceum Theatre – 1885 – opened 1885 on the West side of 312-16 4th
Avenue between 23rd and 24th – (referred to as the New Lyceum Theatre) – Dakolar
1885; Charity Ball 1889 (200), Gold Diggers of 1919 (720), Lion and the Mouse
1905 (686), Mrs. Bumpstead’-Leigh 1911 (64), One of Our Girls 1885 (200),
Pocahontas or The Gentle Savage 1855 (played off and on for 30 years)demolished
in 1902 and became Metropolitan Life Insurance; 2nd Lyceum -
*Lyceum
Theatre
- 149 West 45th St East of Broadway (Shubert-922 seats) Built
in 1903 – see also Wallach’s – Proud Pince 1903 (moved from Herold Square
Theatre); Admiral Crichton – first new play; oldest Broadway theatre still in
use – Daniel Frohman’s apartment above which houses Shubert archives – (1965 to 1969 home of the Phoenix Theatre and the APA Repertory Company -
(You Can’t Take It With You, The Show Off, The Cocktail Party and The
Misanthrope), winner of Regional Theatre Tony Award 1968 – Lion and the Mouse
1905 (686); Boys of Company “B” (John Barrymore,Mack Sennett) 1907; Mrs.
Bumpstead-Leigh (Mrs. Fiske) 1911; Gold Diggers 1919 (720), Sailor Beware 1933
(500); Pre-Honeymoon 1936; Having Wonderful Time 1937 (372); Bachelor Born 1938;
Junior Miss 1941 (710), – home of Tony Randall’s National Actors Theatre – upper
floor now home of Shubert archives – Beautiful People 1941 (120); Doughgirls
1942 (671), their longest run was Born Yesterday 1946 (1642); Caretaker, Country
Girl 1950 (235); Hat Full of Rain (Ben Gazzara,Anthony Franciosa,Shelley
Winters) 1955 (50 weeks); Anna Christie (Celeste Holm); Take a Giant Step (Louis
Gossett) 1953; Hatful of Rain 1955 (398), Goodbye Charlie (Lauren Bacall) 1959
(109); Angel Street, Cold Storage, Taste of Honey (Angela Lansbury,Joan
Plowright,Nigel Davenport,Billy Dee Williams) 1960 (49 weeks); Caretaker 1961;
Your Arm’s Too Short To Box With God 1976;Wings (Constance Cummings) 1979 (117);
Morning’s at Seven 1980 (564); Master Harold..and the Boys (Zakes Mokae,Danny
Glover) 1982; Whoopi Goldberg solo show 1984 (148); Players, 1991-1992 season
Tony Randall’s National Actors Theatre took over but moved to Belasco following
season; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (revival) 1995; Taste of Honey; A Little Like
Magic 1996 (Famous People);Sunshine Boys (Jack Klugman,Tony Randall) 1997 (230);
Night Must Fall (Matthew Broderick) 1999; Lonesome West 1999; I Am My Own Wife
2003 Tony Award Best Play 2004; Macbeth (Patrick Stewart) 2008; Venus in Fur (Nina Arienda/Hugh Dancy) 2012;2nd – Lyceum –
312-16 4th Avenue (23rd and 24th – 1902 theatre demolished; 3rd – Lyceum – 1808
- Broadway and Warren Street – converted from a church – survived a single
season in 1808 – then became Amateur Theatre, Theatre of the Arts, Columbian
Theatre and Washington Theatre – closed 1809; 4th – Lyceum – Wallack’s Lyceum
when opened in 1850 was known as the Lyceum, as was 5th – Lyceum – Fourteenth
Street Theatre from 1873 to 1886
Lynn Redgrave Theatre – as of June 2013 – see 45 Bleecker St Theatre

Lyric Theatre
– see Olympic – 100 Third Avenue between 12th and 13th St. (1274 seats) -
built 1880 as a restaurant – converted into Music Hall – see Hammerstein’s
Olympic – 1910 renovated into motion picture house doubling its seating -
building still intact as a 274 seat movie theatre – City 1909 (190)- 1923
rebuilt with 550 seats – later became porn cinema “All-Male Jewel Theatre”; 2nd
- Lyric Theatre (NYC) - 213 W
42nd Street – built 1903 (1261 seats) – also entrance on 43rd Street – tucked
between the Republic Theatre and Times Square Theatre – facade left intact, but
interior demolished when Ford Centre for the Performing Arts constructed –
opened with Old Heidelburg (Richard Mansfield) 1903; Fantana (Douglas Fairbanks)
1905; York Idea 1906 (66); Chocolate Soldier 1909 (296); Lady and the Sea 1911,
Firefly 1912 (120); Firefly (Rudolf Friml & Arthur Hammerstein) 1912; High
Jinks; For Goodness Sake (Fred and Adele Astaire) 1922, Coconuts (Marx Brothers)
1925, Ramblers (Bobby Clark) 1926 (289); Three Musketeers (Dennis King,Vivienne
Segal) 1928 (7 mos), Fifty Million Frenchmen (Cole Porter) 1929 (257); Run,
Little Chillin 1933; – in 1934 converted to a movie house and in 1966 Lyric and
Apollo were purchased by Livent and the new Ford Center for the Performing Arts
opened in 1999 – see Ford Center for the Performing Arts; 3rd Lyric – Criterion
Theatre was known as Lyric for its first four years; 4th Lyric – opening October 2014 with John Rando’s On The Town, followed by King Kong in Spring 2015 (formerly Foxwoods, then Hilton, then Ford Center for the Performing Arts

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