RSS
ClickBank1


Int. Theatres 3 – Africa – Guatemala










INTERNATIONAL THEATRES – PART 3 – AFRICA TO GUATEMALA

All “Le,” “Les,” and “La’s,” have been
eliminated as has “The,” for easier alphabetization e.g La Salle de l”Ermitage
is under Salle

 

Updated August 18/14

Protected by Copyscape Web Copyright Protection Software

A

Roofed theatres erected for performances came
late in theatrical history. Open-air theatres date back to the 5th Century,
B.C., but it was not until the Renaissance that plays were produced indoors.

 

AFRICA – GHANA – SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DRAMA –
University of Ghana

AFRICA –IBADAN – ARTS THEATRE – 1956 – Ogunmol
Theatre Company

AFRICA – JOHANNESBURG – GLOBE THEATRE – Gold
Reef City – opened May 2000 – 175 seats – African Footprint 2000

AFRICA – JOHANNESBURG – LYRIC THEATRE – Gold
Reef City – opened Oct 2007 – 1001 seats – Hairspray 2007

AFRICA – JOHANNESBURG – MARKET THEATRE – opened 1976 – constructed out of Indian Fruit Market which was built 1913 – Sarafina 1987;

AFRICA – JOHANNESBURG – METRO THEATRE – 1932 –
2800 seats – closed 1970s

AFRICA – JOHANNESBURG – MONTECASINO THEATRE –
new theatre being built for opening production of The Lion King, June 2007

AFRICA – LAGOS – GLOVER MEMORIAL HALL – opened
1899

AFRICA – NAIROBI – DONOVAN MAULE THEATRE –
opened 1948

AFRICA, NIGERIA – NATIONAL ARTS THEATRE –
presents a wide variety of performance art – currently up for sale (Oct 2001)

AFRICA – THEATRE AFRICAIN – 1949 – renamed
1958 Ballets Africains

ALBANIA – BUTRINT –

TEATRI ANTIK
– ancient Greek theatre built 3rd Century B.C. – 2,500 seats –
rebuilt and converted to Roman theatre 2nd Century A.D.

ALBANIA – DURAZZO –
SITE OF ANCIENT
ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE

ALBANIA –PRISTINA – Geg Theatre

ALBANIA – TIRANA –
People’s Theatre
1960-66 – houses Teatri I Operas dhe Baletit – resident opera and ballet
companies

ALBANIA – USKUDAR – Migeni Theatre

ALGERIA – AL-JAZA’IR –
THEATRE

ALGERIA – CHERCHELL –

ANCIENT ROMAN THEATRE

ALGERIA – DJEMILAANCIENT
ROMAN THEATRE

ALGERIA – GUELMAANCIENT
ROMAN THEATRE

ALGERIA – MASCARA –
THEATRE

ALGERIA – QASENTINA –
THEATRE

ALGERIA – SAIDA –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL

ALGERIA – SETIF –
THEATRE

ALGERIA – SIDI-BEL-ABBES –
THEATRES

ALGERIA – SKIKDA –
THEATRE

ALGERIA – TIMGADANCIENT
ROMAN THEATRE

ALGERIA – WAHRAN –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL

ANDORA – ORDINO –
AUDITORI NACIONAL
built early 1930s- closed in 1950s – used as warehouse – reopened 1991 as
concert hall – 509 seats

ANNABA –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – COLISEO PROVISIONAL
– 1825

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – INSTITUTO DI TELLA

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – LUNA PARK ARENA – Dracula 1971

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – MAIPO THEATRE – Eva 1986

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – METROPOLITAN
THEATRE

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – NATIONAL THEATRE –
La muchachada del Centro 1932 – over 900 performances

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – PLANETA – Marie de
Buenos Aires 1968

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO ASTRAL – Si
Eva se hubiese vestido 1944

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO CASINO

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO COLISEO ARGENTINO

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –

TEATRO COLON (COLUMBUS)
– built 1857 at another location – 2500 seats – new
one built 1889-1908 – 2500 seats and 1000 standing room – 1925 became Municipal
Theatre – reopened with Aida – theatre restored and reopened May 24/10

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO DE LA
VICTORIA – El Gaucho de Buenos Aires 1857

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO DIURNO PARQUE LEZAMA

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO MARCONI – 1903 –
used for opera seasons into 1950s

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO MUNICIPAL – Sarmineto 1971

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO NACIONAL CERVANTES
– built 1919-1921 as Teatro Cervantes – 1947 renamed as present – fire 1961 –
reopned 1968

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO OLYMPICO –
Justicia Criolla 1897

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO OPERA – OLD AND NEW
– built 1872 Il Trovatore – demolished 1935; 2nd built 1930s – 2500 seats –
renovated 1998

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO PORTENA –
Judia 1926

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES – TEATRO PRESIDENTE
ALVEAR – Asi se ama en Sudamerica 1950

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO
SAN MARTIN
– built 1953-56

ARGENTINA – BUENOS AIRES –
TEATRO VICTORIA

ARGENTINA – CIUDAD DE CORDOBA –
TEATRO DEL LIBERATADOR
GENERAL SAN MARTIN

ARGENTINA – LA PLATA –
TEATRO ARGENTINO – built
1880 – Otello – destroyed by fire 1977 – new culture centre erected on the site

ARGENTINA – ROSARIO –
GRAN TEATRO COLON

ARGENTINA – ROSARIO –
TEATRO DE LA OPERA

ARMENIA – YEREVAN
CAFESJIAN CENTER FOR THE ARTS
– opened Nov 2009

ARMENIA – YEREVAN –
KHACHATURIAN HALL
built 1936-37 – renovated 1978-80 – 1300 seats – home to Armenian Philharmonic
Orchestra

ARMENIA – YEREVAN –
KINOTEATR MOSKVA

ARMENIA – YEREVAN –
TEATR DRAMY IM. SUNDUKYAN

ARUBA – ORANJESTAD –
CASA DI CULTURA

*ASIA –

USF ASIAN THEATRE SITE

Atmospheric Theatres

AUSTRALIA –

TICKETMASTER – AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – ADELAIDE REPERTORY
SOCIETY – 1908

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – CAPRI THEATRE –

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – FESTIVAL CENTRE – King
William Road – opened 1973theatre concert hall seats 2,000; Playhouse 630 seats
and open air amphitheatre – Les Miserables 1991

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – HER MAJESTY’S THEATRE –
Les Miserables;

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – QUEEN’S THEATRE – 1842

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – ROYAL VICTORIA – 1839

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
THEATRE COMPANY

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – THEATRE ROYAL – at
Adelaide Tavern

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE – THEATRE’62 – now
extinct

AUSTRALIA – ADELAIDE –

Weimar Room
– 27 Hindley Street, Adelaide 5000 South Australia – cabaret
venue

 

AUSTRALIA – BALLARAT –
HER
MAJESTY’S THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – BALLARAT –
HER MAJESTYS THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – BALLARAT –
VICTORIA THEATRE – built
1950s

AUSTRALIA, BRIGHTON –
DENDY
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, BRIGHTON –

PRINCE GEORGE THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – BRISBANE –
HER MAJESTYS THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE –

MAJESTIC THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – BRISBANE – PLAZA THEATRE – 1930 –
one of two atmospherics remaining in Australia – 1500 seats – closed 1961 – now
Paddington Antique Centre

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE – Regent Theatre

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE – QUEENSLAND THEATRE
COMPANY

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE –
REGENT
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE –
STRAND
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE – TWELFTH NIGHT THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE –

WINTERGARDEN THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – CARLTON –
Ozcat@Red’s
Rydges Carlton, 701 Swanston Street – cabaret venue

 

AUSTRALIA, FITZROY –
LYRIC
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, GOULBURN – EMPIRE THEATRE –
Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

AUSTRALIA, HOBART – ROYAL VICTORIA – 1837 –
now Theatre Royal

AUSTRALIA, HOBART – TASMANIAN THEATRE COMPANY

AUSTRALIA, HOBART – THEATRE ROYAL – built 1834
– opened 1837

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – ARROW THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – ATHENIUM THEATRE –

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – AUDITORIUM THEATRE –

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – AUSTRALIAN PERFORMING
GROUP

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –

CAPITOL THEATRE
– 1924

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – CHAPEL OFF CHAPEL – 12
Little Chapel Street, Prahran – cabaret venue

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – COMEDY THEATRE – 240
Exhibition St – built 1928 – 997 seats

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –
DELUXE
THEATRE/HOYT’S ESQUIRE
– 1914-1915 on site of St. George’s Hall – Bourke Street – 2000 seats

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – ELIZABETHAN THEATRE
TRUST – founded 1955 – took over former Majestic Theatre – built 1917 but later
used as cinema, as its base – renovated and redecorated – reopened as the
Elizabethan Theatre in 1955

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – EMERALD HILL THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –

FORUM THEATRE
– Russell and Flinders Sts – built 1928-29 as State Theatre –
Atmospheric style – 3371 seats – 1961 divided into 2nd – Forum and Rapallo –
1981 renamed Forum I (1500 standing,800 seated) and II (540 seats)

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
HER MAJESTYS THEATRE
1886 built as Alexandra Theatre – 2500 seats – became Queen’s Theatre 1897 –
reopened as Her Majesty’s 1901 – renamed His Majesty’s 1924 – fire 1929 – reoped
1934 as His Majesty’s – 1600 seats – 1953 renamed Her Majesty’s

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – HOOPLA THEATRE
FOUNDATION – 1980 – became Playbox Theatre Company

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – LA MAMA

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – LITTLE THEATRE – later
St. Marti’s Theatre 1931

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – MAGNORMOS THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
MAJESTIC
THEATRE
– 1917 – later used as cinema – reopened as Elizabethan Theatre 1955
– see Elizabethan Theatre Trust

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – MALTHOUSE THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – MAYFAIR THEATRE – 1913
– 1489 seats – originally a concert hall – demolished 1933 and Metro Theatre
built – opened 1934 – changed to Mayfair 1975 and closed 1982

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –
MELBA
THEATRE

*AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
MELBOURNE
THEATRE COMPANY
– one of world’s largest theatre companies – oldest
professional company in Australia – 1953 – started as Union Theatre Repertory
Company appearing at Union Theatre at University of Melbourne – refurbished
Fairfax Theatrein Victorian Arts Centre – Summer of the 17th Doll 1955 – moved
to Russell Street Theatre – 1960 – 1973 took over St. Martin’s Theatre and 1977
to Athenaeum Theatre and 1979 Athenaeum 2

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE – PALACE THEATRE – 1837
seats – opened as live theatre called National Amphitheatre 1912 – 1916 became
Palace – 1934 became Apollo – 1940 became St. James – MGM renamed it Metro 1952
– 1970 became live theatre again (Hair 39 weeks) – reooped as Palace in 1974 –
since 1987 has been Metro Nightclub – now as Palace is live music concert venue

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – PALAIS ROYALE (St Kilda)

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –

PARAMOUNT THEATRE
– Bourke Street – built 1915 – 1500 seats

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – PAVILLION – 1841 –
later called Theatre Royal

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – PLAZA BALLROOM – see
Regent Theatre

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –
PLAZA
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – Playbox Theatre

 

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –
PRINCESS THEATRE
– 163 Spring St – built 1854 as Astley’s Amphitheatre – 1488 seats – later
rebuilt and renamed Royal Amphitheatre – 1857 renovated and renamed Princess
Theatre and Opera House – demolished 1885 – rebuilt 1886 as Triunvirate – Maid
of the Mountains 1921; Collit’s Inn 1933 (16 weeks); The Cedar Tree 1934; 1987
renovated and reopened with The Mikado; Les Miserables 1989; Boy From Oz; The
Producers 2004; Phantom of the Opera, Cats etc.; Jersey Boys – March 2009;

 

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE –
REGENT
THEATRE
– 191 Collins St – opened 1929 – reopened 1996 as restored venue –
1,750 seats – home to Plaza Ballroom

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – RUSSELL STREET THEATRE
– see Melbourne Theatre Company

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
S. MYER MUSIC BOWL
open air theatre 1959 – 13,000 seats

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – MELBOURNE THEATRE COMPANY (MTC)

AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE – ST. MARTIN’S THEATRE –
1931 built as Melbourne Little Theatre – 1962 name changed – 1973 leased to
Melbourne Theatre Company

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
STATE
THEATRE
– Flinders St – 1921 – 3371 seats – largest of Australia’s 5
atmospheric theatres

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE –
TIVOLI
THEATRE
– built as Melbourne Opera House – demolished 1901 – rebuilt as
Tivoli Theatre – closed 1966 – reopned as cinema – destroyed by fire 1967

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE – UNION THEATRE –
Melbourne – Lola Montez 1958

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE – VENUS RISING FESTIVAL

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE – VICTORIA – Melba
Memorial Centre – 1973 – home to Victorian and Australian Opera Companies

AUSTRALIA – MELBOURNE – VICTORIAN ARTS CENTRE
– originally Cooper and Bailey’s Great American International Circus tent 1877 –
1901 built Olympia – permanent circus home – 1907 renamed and 1911 converted to
a cinema – later became Trocadero – closed 1950s and destroyed by fire 1953 –
rebuilt 1973-84 with State Theatre – 2000 seats; Playhouse and George Fairfax
Studio with 376 seats – Melbourne Concert Hall opened 1982 – 2600 seats

AUSTRALIA – PERTH – AMBASSADOR’S THEATRE –
Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

AUSTRALIA – PERTH – FORUM THEATRE – 1990s
restores – 1962 – 944 seats

AUSTRALIA – PERTH –
HEATH
LEDGER THEATRE
– 575 seats – currently under construction

AUSTRALIA – PERTH – HIS MAJESTYS THEATRE –
built 1896 as Ye Olde Englishe Faire – current theatre built 1904 – cinema
during WWII – major refurbishment reopened 1980 – Les Miserables 1990

AUSTRALIA, PERTH – METRO THEATRE – started as
Queen’s Hall 1899 – 1927 became Regent Theatre – 1938 taken over by MGM –
demolished 1973

AUSTRALIA, PERTH – NATIONAL THEATRE COMPANY

AUSTRALIA, PERTH – PERTH ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE
– largest specially build theatre in the world – 8,500 seats – opened 1974

AUSTRALIA – PERTH – RAPALLO THEATRE – 1962 –
627 seats

AUSTRALIA, POMONA –
MAJESTIC
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, QUEENSLAND –
OPERA QUEENSLAND

AUSTRALIA, QUEENSLAND – PLAZA THEATRE – 1930 –
one of only 2 remaining atmospheric theatres in Australia – 1500 seats – closed
1961 – now Paddington Antique Centre – much of original decoration has been
preserved

AUSTRALIA, QUEENSLAND (Masthead Way, Sanctuary
Cove) –

VILLAGE THEATRE
– cabaret venue

AUSTRALIA, RESERVOIR –
CINEMA
NORTH

AUSTRALIA, ST. KILDA –
ASTOR THEATRE – corner Chapel Street
and Dandenong Road – built in the 1930s – the seating capacity of 1,200 has been
reduced from original 1,700

AUSTRALIA, SALE –
PALAIS
THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – SURRY HILLS – BELVOIR STREET THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – AUSTRALIAN BALLET

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – AUSTRALIAN OPERA COMPANY
– Opera House opened 1973 – 2 main halls, the larger one a concert hall and
smaller the Sydney Opera House

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
CAPITOL THEATRE
13 Campbell Street, Haymarket – – Atmospheric style – oldest theatre building in
NSW, the Capitol has more than a century of performances to its credit. It
features design and decoration dating from 1892-93, retained from its earlier
incarnations as the New Belmore Market building, a circus Hippodrome (complete
with hydraulic seal pit) and a lavishly adorned ’20s picture palace – Les
Miserables – early 1990s; Miss Saigon 1995; Lion King (437 performances as of
Oct 27/04 – longest running show since Les Mis early 1990s); Billy Elliot Jan
2008;

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – COMEDY THEATRE – 1928 –
1000 seats

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY –
CRITERION THEATRE – 1886
– 991 seats – closed 1935 – demolished – Criterion Hotel now occupies site

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –

ENMORE THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – ENSEMBLE

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – FORUM THEATRE – 1929 –
opened as State Theatre

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY –

HER MAJESTY’S THEATRE
– Ballarat – Australia’s oldest surviving
purpose-built theatre building – opened 1875 (959 seats) as Academy of Music –
1899 renamed Her Majesty’s Theatre; 1964 closed; 1965 renovated and renamed the
Memorial Theatre; 1990 renamed Her Majesty’s Theatre; Boy From Oz 1998

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – INDEPENDENT THEATRE –
1930s – closed 1977

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
KABARETT
JUNCTION
– 139 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction – cabaret venue

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
LYRIC THEATRE
We Will Rock You 2003 (longest running show in the country);

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – MARIAN STREET – once the
Community Theatre

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – METRO KINGS CROSS – 1006
seats – originally part of live entertainment complex called Minerva Gate – 1937
– Minerva Theatre opened 1939 – opned with Idiot’s Delight – live plays
continued to 1950 when MGM refurbished – now a sound stage and recording
facility

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – METROPOLITAN THEATRE –
1940s

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – MINERVA THEATRE – 1940s

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – NEW TIVOLI THEATRE –
Collit’s Inn 1933 (8 weeks);

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – NIMROD THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – OLD TOTE THEATRE – 1963 –
Cherry Orchard 1963 – replaced by Sydney Theatre Company in 1978 – 1979 became
Sydney Theatre Company

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – OPERA AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
OPERA HOUSE – see
Sydney Opera House

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –

PERFORMANCE SPACE

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – PHILLIP STREET THEATRE –
1954- opened with Top of the Bill 1954 – in 1974 – became cinema

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – PLAZA THEATRE – George
Street – now Planet Hollywood

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – PRINCESS THEATRE – 1886 –
1460 seats

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – PRINCE EDWARD THEATRE

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – REGENT THEATRE – 1929 –
2174 seats

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – ST. JAMES THEATRE – 1926
– 1800 seats – depression and the arrival of the talkies destroyed the demand
for live theatre and the St James floundered – 1929 the theatre became cinema
and after a brief return to live theatre in 1930, it became a permanent home to
movies in 1931. Most shockingly its spectacular decoration was covered by later
renovations which desecrated the spirit of the 1920s – In 1971, the theatre was
demolished to make way for an office block

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – Savoy Theatre – built 1920s as film house – 1940s – showed French films – restored 1970s – reopened May 1976

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
SHOWROOM

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY – Side-On Café – 83
Parramatta Road, Annandale

 

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
STABLES THEATRE
10 Nimrod St., Kings Cross

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – SYDNEY THEATRE COMPANY

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
STAR CITY CASINO

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
STATE THEATRE
49 Market Street – 1920s – home to Sydney Film Festival

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
SYDNEY ENTERTAINMENT
CENTRE

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –

SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE
– opened 1973 with War and Peace – 4 auditoriums –
concert hall 2697 seats, and smaller hall 1547 seats – Drama Theatre 500 seats

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – THEATRE – 1796 – 1798
demolished; 1800 another theatre

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY – SYDNEY THEATRE CO – new
home with 3 performance spaces

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
THEATRE ROYAL – near Savoy Theatre
Blue Mountain Melody (Cyril Ritchard) 1934; Les Miserables 1987

*AUSTRALIA –

THEATRE GUIDE

*AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY –

THEATRE ROYAL
- Australia’s oldest theatre – built 1834 and opened in 1837

AUSTRALIA – SYDNEY –
TIVOLI THEATRE

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY –
WHARF

AUSTRIA – BADEN BEI WIEN –

AUSTRIA – BAD GLEICHENBERG –

VEREINSTHEATER

AUSTRIA – BAD HALL –

KURTHEATER

AUSTRIA – BAD ISCHL –

KONGRE B-UND THEATERHAUS

AUSTRIA – BAD ISCHL –
LEHAR-FILM THEATER

AUSTRIA – BERNDORF –
STADTTHEATER

AUSTRIA – BREGENZ –
SEEBUHNE/FESTSPIELHAUS

AUSTRIA – BREGENZ – Summer Festival on Lake
Bregenz

AUSTRIA – EISENSTADT –
HAYDNSAAL

AUSTRIA – ERL –
PASSIONSSPIELHAUS

AUSTRIA – FELDKIRCH –
MONTFORTHAUS

AUSTRIA – GMUNDON –
KURSAAL

AUSTRIA – GRAZ –
FREILICHTBUHNE

AUSTRIA – GRAZ –
GRAZER CONGRESS

AUSTRIA – GRAZ –
OPERNHAUS – built 1899 –
damaged 1944

AUSTRIA – GRAZ –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS

AUSTRIA – GRAZ – THEATER – built 1776

AUSTRIA – GREIN–
STADTTHEATER

AUSTRIA – INNSBRUCK – PLAYHOUSE – built 1652-4
was lst detached opera house in German speaking lands – new theatre built 1846 –
in 1945 became the Tiroler Landes Theatre

AUSTRIA – INNSBRUCK –
STADTSAAL (old and new
KAMMERSPIELE)

AUSTRIA – INNSBRUCK –
TIROLER LANDES THEATER

AUSTRIA – KLAGENFURT –
KONZERTHAUS

AUSTRIA – KLAGENFURT –
STADTTHEATER

AUSTRIA – LINZ –
BRUCKNERHAUS

AUSTRIA – LINZ –
KOLOSSEUM

AUSTRIA – LINZ –
LANDES THEATRE – built
1958

AUSTRIA – LINZ – STADT THEATRE – 1940

AUSTRIA – PRESSBAUM –
THEATER TRITTBRETTI

AUSTRIA – REICHENAU AN DER RAX –
KURTTHEATER

AUSTRIA – ST. MARGARETHAN UN BURGENLAND –
passions spielbuhne
romersteinbroch
– 1961, used every 5 years for "Passionsfestspiele", i. e.
open-air performances of the Passion of Christ – since 1996 also used for the "Opernfestspiele"
summer opera festival

AUSTRIA – ST. POLTEN –
STADTTHEATER – Built
1820 – since 1849, owned by the city of Sankt Pölten – closed 1881. Stagehouse
demolished – 1893 new theatre within the walls of the former building – damaged
by bombs in World War II – repaired. 1966-1969 major rebuilding and renovation.
Re-opened 1969 – 2005 renaming to "Schauspielhaus"

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
AICHERS MARIONETTENTHEATER

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG – FESTIVAL THEATRE – 1926

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG – FESTSPIELHAUS – converted
from Old Riding School – opened 1927 – restored 1960 – three theatres under one
roof: Felsenreitschule built 1693 – used as an open-air theatre for sport, dance
and theatre performances since the 18th century – 1549 seats; Kleines
Festspielhaus built 1924-1926 -1300 seats; Großes Festspielhaus built 1956-1960
– 2177 seats.

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
FREILICHTTHEATER DOMPLATZ
– open-air theatre on the front stairs of the Salzburg cathedral – first used
1920

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
KOLLEGIENSIRCHE – Church
built 1696-1707

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
LANDESTHEATER – built
1892-1893 as "Stadttheater" at the site of the old "Hoftheater" (destroyed for
fire safety reasons in 1892) – 1924 renovation – 1938-1939 – 1940 renamed to "Landestheater"
– 1977/1978 renovation – used for plays, and opera performances by a resident
ensemble and performances by the annual "Salzburger Festspiele" summer festival
– 1000 seats

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
MOZARTEUM – Built
1910-1914 for the "Internationale Stiftung Mozarteum" – contains two concert
halls, library, administrative rooms, and class rooms used by the "Universität
Mozarteum". "Großer Saal" with 807 seats used as a concert venue by the "Internationale
Stiftung Mozarteum" and the "Salzburger Festspiele" summer festival. "Wiener
Saal" with 200 seats used for chamber concerts

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
SCHLOB
HELLBRUNN-MECHANISCHES THEATER
– open-air mechanical "theatre", built
1748-1750

*AUSTRIA – SALZBURG –
SALZBURG
MARIONETTE THEATRE
– formed 1913

AUSTRIA – SALZBURG – SUMMER FESTIVAL – began
1921 at the Landes Theatre

AUSTRIA – SCHWARZENBERG –
ANGELIKA-KAUFFMANN-SAAL

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – AKADEMIETHEATER – 1922 –
500 seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – ALTWIENER VOLKSTHEATER –
early 1800s

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – BOSENDORFER-SAAL – old –
concert hall, built 1872 by converting the former "Liechtenstein Riding School"
– used for solo recitals and chamber concerts – demolished 1913

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
BURGERTHEATER – built
1904-1905 for drama performances – 1200 seats – 1910, used as an operetta
theatre. 1951-1953 used as a second stage by the Theater in der Josefstadt
company – 1953 renamed "Broadwaybühne" for musical performances – later used as
rehearsal stage for radio station – demolished in 1960 in favour of a bank
building

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
BURGTHEATER – old and new
– building on the site built 1540 as "Ballhaus" – used for ball games and royal
festivites – 1741 completely rebuilt after unsuccesful attempts to convert to a
theatre proper – 1748 opened as "Königliches Theater nächst der Burg" -1756
rebuilding and extension, installation of a new façade at the rear of the
stagehouse – 1776 renamed "Teutsches Nationaltheater nächst der Burg" – 1794
renamed "K. K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg" -1848 renamed "K. K. Hof- und
Nationaltheater"- 1852 renamed "K. K. Hofburgtheater" – 1125 seats. Demolished
1888 – 1874-1888 a new "Burgtheater" was built at another site – 1919 renamed "Burgtheater"-
destroyed by bombs and a fire in 1945 – 1953-1955 rebuilt -1313 seats.

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
CARL-THEATER – Built
1847 replacing the demolished "Leopoldstädter Theater" (1781-1847 – Between 1854
and 1860, originally 1400, later 1121 seats – closed 1929 – damaged by bombs in
1944 – demolished in 1951

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – DIE HOLLE

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – FLEDERMAUS – Kartnerstrasse

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
FREILICHTBUHNE WIENER
FESTWOCHER
– open-air concert stage

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – GRAZ – theatre bates from
1825 and seats 580 as well as 100 seat workshop

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
HAUS DER MUSIK

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – HOF OPERA – 1869

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
JOHANN-STRAUB-THEATER
built 1908 – 1192 seats -1931 converted to a cinema, renamed "Scala" – 1948
renamed "Neues Theater in der Scala" and again used as a theatre proper –
demolished 1959

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – JOSEFSTADTER THEATRE – 1788

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – KAMMERSPIELE

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
KARNTNERTOR – First
theatre on site built 1709 – 1710 Altwiener Volkstheater – first permanent
theatre building in Vienna – destroyed by a fire in 1761; 2nd "Kärtnertortheater"
built 1761-1763 as "Kaiserliches Hoftheater" – since the early 19th century,
mainly used for opera and ballet – after the new Hofoper had opened in 1869, the
old theatre was first used for smaller-scale opera performances, but eventually
closed 1870. Demolished 1873-1874 – 1876, the "Hotel Sacher" was built on the
site

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
KONZERTHAUS – complex
comprises two separate buildings: the "Konzerthaus" concert hall, which has the
"Großer Saal" with 2030 seats (today 1840), "Mittlerer Saal" (later renamed "Mozartsaal")
with 893 seats (today 704), and "Kleiner Saal" (later renamed "Schubertsaal")
with 414 seats (today 336) – 1997-2000 interior renovations and rebuilding,
including a new hall, "Neuer Saal" (400 seats). home to the Wiener Symphoniker,
Wiener Kammerorchester, and Klangforum Wien orchestras; and the "K. k. Akademie
für Musik und darstellende Kunst" (Royal Aacademy of Music and Performing Arts)
– 1913; The Akademie – 521 seats – opened 1922

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
KRISTALLPALAST-KINO

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
KURSALON – concert hall,
built 1867 by Johann Garben. Famous as venue of concerts by the "Waltz
King"Johann Strauß jr.

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – LEOPOLDSTADTER THEATER –
1781 – demolished 1945

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

LUSTSPIELTHEATER IM PRATER
– Built 1862 – 1893 renamed "Jantsch-Theater" –
1898 rebuilt – 1905 renamed "Lustspieltheater". Later used as a cinema – 800
seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

MUSEUMSQUARTIER HALL

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

MUSIKVEREIN
– Concert hall, built 1867-1870 – 2001-2004 major rebuilding of
the whole complex (addition of new halls and rehearsal rooms). Home to the "Orchesterverein
der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde" and the "Wiener Symphoniker" orchestras as
well as the "Singverein der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde" chorus – also
regularly used by the Wiener Philharmoniker and the RSO Wien. The complex
includes several halls: "Großer Musikvereinssaal" (also known as "Goldener Saal"
[Golden Hall]). 1744 seats (+ 300 standing); "Brahms-Saal". Opened 1870 as "Kleiner
Saal" with a concert by Clara Schumann. 1937 renamed in honour of the German
composer, Johannes Brahms, 1992-1993 renovations to the original plans – 600
seats; "Gottfried-von-Einem-Saal". Opened as "Kammersaal"- Renovated 1996. "4
Neue Säle" [4 New Halls], built 2001-2004 by Wilhelm Holzbauer and Dieter
Irresberger. Acoustic consultant: Bernd Quirin; "Gläserner Saal" [Glass Hall],
used for orchestra rehearsals and concerts – 380 seats; "Hölzerner Saal" [Wooden
Hall] – 50 seats; "Metallener Saal" [Metallic Hall] – 70 seats; "Steinerner Saal"
[Stone Hall] – 60 seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

NEVES WIENER STADTTHEATER
– Built 1913-1914 – – 1918 interior rebuilding and
used for operetta performances – slightly damaged in World War II – demolished
1960-1961 – 1968-1969 a library ("Haus des Buches") and a hotel were built on
the former site of the theatre

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – OPERA HOUSE – 17th Century

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

PALAIS LOBKOWITZ
– Built 1694 – from 1745, used as city palace by the
Lobkowitz family. From the late 19th century, used by embassies and cultural
institutes – 1979-1991 major renovation as a theatre museum, including the
puppet theatre "Richard Teschners Figurenspiegel"

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

RAIMUND THEATER
– Built in 1893 as a private theatre used for drama
performances – since 1908, mainly used for operetta performances. Since 1976,
also used for musical performances – 1985 restoration – Mainly used for major
musical performances – Dance of the Vampires 1997 – 1640 seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

REDOUTENSALE
– First entertainment venue on the site built 1629-1631 as a
dancing hall – 1651 conversion to the "Komödienhaus" theatre – 1659 rebuilding –
destroyed by a fire 1699 – 1705 rebuilt as an opera house – Built 1744-1748
converting the previous theatre to two concert and ball halls, "Großer
Redoutensaal – 680 seats" and "Kleiner Redoutensaal" – 1759-1760 rebuilding by
Nikolaus Pacassi. Used for balls, concerts, and other court festivities-
1773-1776 extension by the "Durchfahrtshalle" towards the Stallburg – 1816,
1840, 1892-1893 alterations – 1921 installation of a theatre ("Theater im
Redoutensaal") – 1973 conversion to a congres centre – "Großer Redoutensaal"
completely destroyed, "Kleiner Redoutensaal – 260 seats" severely damaged by a
fire in 1992. 1992-1997 rebuilt – currently used for concerts and congresses

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – RING THEATER – fire may
have killed as many as 900

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

RONACHER
– Built 1887-1888 as "Concert- und Ballhaus Ronacher" replacing the
remains of the "Stadttheater" (built 1871-1872, destroyed by a fire 1884) –
complex inlcuded a variety theatre and a hotel – also known as "Etablissement
Ronacher" or simply "Ronacher". 1945-1955 used as an interim home to the
Burgtheater drama company. 1955-1960 again used as a variety theatre. 1960-1976
used as a TV studio. Closed 1976. Re-opened 1986 – subsequently used for various
performances during the "Wiener Festwochen" festival. Since 1987 operated by "Vereinigte
Bühnen Wien". 1988-1990 used for musical and opera performances. 1990-1993 major
renovation. 1993-1997 used as a variety and revue theatre. Since 1997, used for
various theatre and musical performances – 1037 seats – Spring Awakening March,
2009

*AUSTRIA – VIENNA –
SALZBURG
MARIONETTE THEATRE
– formed 1913

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – SCHAUSPIELSCHULE KRAUSS –
2008 is 60th Anniversary of Vienna Acting School

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

SCHLOBTHEATER SCHONBRUNN
– see Schonbrunn Palace – opened 1749 – used for
student performances of opera and drama by the "Universität für Musik und
Darstellende Kunst" and the "Reinhard-Seminar", as well as for opera
performances by the "Wiener Kammeroper" ensemble.

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – SCHONBRUNN PALACE – rococo
theatre built 1747

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – SIMPLICISSMUS “Simpl” – 1912 – restaurant with entertainment – still exists

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

STAATSOPER
– Staats Opera – Built 1863-1869 as "K. k. Hof-Operntheater" ,
near the site of the old Kärntnertortheater (1st theatre built 1709, destroyed
1761; 2nd theatre built 1761-1763, demolished 1870) – 1920 renamed "Staatsoper"
– almost completely destroyed by bombs 1945 – restored and rebuilt – re-opened
1955 – original capacity: 2324, today: 2200; 1999 installation of a theatre
tent, "Kinderopern-Zelt" for children’s operas on the roof balcony by Wilhelm
Holzbauer. Also known as "mobilkom-Zelt" after a sponsor. Opened 1999 – 140
seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

STADTTHEATER
– Built 1871-1872 as private theatre – 1500 seats – destroyed
by a fire 1884 – 1887-1888 new building complex at the site of the Stadttheater,
while preserving the old façade – opened as "Concert- und Ballhaus Ronacher"
including a variety theatre and a hotel

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – STERZING – 1455 on –
passion plays

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – *THEATER
AN DER WIEN
– Built 1798-1801 named "Theater an der Wien" [Theatre on the
banks of the Wien] after the nearby Wien river. From 1803 to 1805 Ludwig van
Beethoven lived in the theatre building – 1902 built a 5-storey apartment house
above the theatre’s Wienzeile wing – from 1945 to 1955 home to the Wiener
Staatsoper ensemble (together with the Volksoper building). Closed 1955 due to
safety concerns. 1960-1962 renovation – from 1983 to 1988 "Cats" – used for
operetta, musical theatre and opera performances during "Wiener Festwochen"
festival

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – THEATER AN KARNTNERTHOR –
built 1708 as Opera House (Hofburg Theatre)

AUSTRIA – VIENNA – THEATER AUF DER WIEDEN –
1787

*AUSTRIA, VIENNA –

THEATER IN DER JUSEFSTADT
– First theatre on the site built 1788 as a
backyard extension to the pub "Bey den goldenen Straussen". 1801 renovation.
1812 auditorium rebuilding. 1814 auditorium rebuilding. Mainly used for comedy
and drama performances. Closed 29 Apr 1822. Demolished in 1822 – current theatre
built 1822 – also used for opera performances – 1825 interior rebuilding – 1832
interior rebuilt – 1834 opening of "Sträußel-Saal" ballroom – 1837 & 1848 & 1855
& 1871 interior redecoration – 1881-1882 technical rebuilding due to new safety
laws. 1923-1924 – 1965 technical stage rebuilding, auditorium and foyer
alterations – 1970 renovations – 1983 Sträußelsaal renovations

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

URANIA – THEATER
– 1898

*AUSTRIA, VIENNA – THEATER IN DER LEOPOLDSTADT
– 1781

*AUSTRIA –

VIENNA STATE OPERA HOUSE
– created in the 1860s – opened in 1869 – bombed in
1945 – repaired by 1955

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

VIENNA STATE OPERA
– known as Staatsoper – 1869 – 2276 seats – damaged by
bombs WWII – reopened 1955

 

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

VOLKSOPER
– built 1898 as "Kaiserjubiläums-Stadttheater" – performances of
light opera and operetta, house known under the popular name "Volksoper"
[People's Opera] – 1938 renamed "Städtische Volksoper". From 1945 to 1955 home
to the Wiener Staatsoper ensemble (together with the Theater an der Wien
building) – 1961-1963 enlargement and renovation, 1973 redecoration – 1820 seats

AUSTRIA – VIENNA –

VOLKSTHEATER
– Built 1888-1889 as "Deutsches Volkstheater" – 1901 and 1911
extensions of stagehouse – 1907 extension by a foyer restaurant and box office –
1939-1945 part of the Nazi "Kraft durch Freude" programme (name changed to
"Kraft-durch-Freude-Theater") – 1939 rebuilding including removal of the façade
statues – 1944 dome and foyers destroyed by bombs. 1945 restored and renamed "Volkstheater".
1980-1981 general exterior and interior renovation – originally 1900, today 1148
seats

AUSTRIA – WELS –
STADTTHEATER GRIEF
Until 1904, used as concert hall and ballroom for the "Hotel zum Greifen" – 1904
converted to a theatre proper and renamed "Stadttheater"- destroyed by bombs
1944. 1946-1948 reconstruction. Since then until the 1970s, mainly used as a
cinema and, once a week, for theatre performances. 1957 stage modernization.
1988 rebuilding of the stagehouse – currently used for theatre performances,
concerts, as a cinema, and for balls and small congresses – 630 seats

AUSTRIA – WEINER NEUSTADT –

STADTTHEATER
– built in the late 17th century as a church – 1794 converted
to a theatre – 624 seats

AZERBAIJAN – BAKI –
TEATR OPERY I BALETA
Built 1909 – 1983-1985 restorations – 1985 severely damaged by a fire – restored
and re-opened 1988

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

B

BAVARIA – OBERAMMERGAU

BELARUS – GOMEL –
ABLASNI DRAMATITSHNI TEATR

BELARUS – HRODNA –
KINATEATR CHYRVONAYA ZORKE

BELARUS – MAHILYOW –
ABLASNI DRAMATITSHNI TEATR
– Cinema, built 1930 replacing the cinema "Chary" – destroyed in World War II –
rebuilt 1954 – 526 seats

BELARUS – MINSK –
PALATS KULTURY I SPORTO

BELARUS – MINSK –
TEATR

BELARUS – MINSK –
TEATR IM. YANKA KUPALA

BELARUS – MINSK –
TEATR MUSYKAL’NOJ KOMEDII

BELARUS – MINSK –
TEATR OPERY I BALETA
Built 1934-1939 for opera and ballet performances by the resident companies

BELGIUM – ANTWERP –
BOURLASCHOUWBURG – Built
1834 as "Théâtre Royal Français" – home to the "Toneelhuis" drama company

BELGIUM – ANTWERP –
DE VLAAMSE OPERA
opened 1907 as "Lyrisch Vlaamsch Tooneel" – also known as "Nieuwe Lyrische
Schouwburg" – 1050 seats – one of the homes of the opera company "De vlaamse
Opera"

BELGIUM – ANTWERP – FLEMISH NATIONAL THEATRE

BELGIUM – ANTWERP –
HIPPODROME – built ca.
1900 – demolished 1973

BELGIUM – ANTWERP –
KONINLIJKE NEDERLANDSE
SCHOUWBURG
– Built 1874 as "Nederlandse Schouwburg" for Flemish theatre
performances by the "Nationaal Toneel" theatre company – 1903 renamed "Koninlijke
Nederlandse Schouwburg (KNS)" – 1934 the KNS theatre company moved to the
Bourlaschouwburg – 1945-1958 used by the "Koninklijk Jeugdtheater" [Royal Youth
Theatre] – demolished in 1960; Also known as "Théâtre Flamand", "Stedelijke
Huurschouwburg", "Volksschouwburg", "Stadsschouwburg", and "Jeugdtheater"

BELGIUM – ANTWERP – ROYAL FLEMISH OPERA – 1893

BELGIUM – ANTWERP –
THEATRE DES VARIETES

BELGIUM – ANTWERP – VLAAMSE VOLKSTONEEL – 1918

BELGIUM – BLANKENBERGE –
KURSAAL

BELGIUM – BLANKENBERGE –
SCHOUWBURG

BELGIUM – BRUGGE –
CONCERTGEBOUW – concert
hall and conference centre, built 2000-2002 – complex comprises a concert hall
(1306 seats), a chamber music hall (320 seats), various function rooms, and a
restaurant

BELGIUM – BRUGGE –
STADSSCHOUWBURG – 750
seats

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – ANTOINE’S THEATRE LIBRE –
1888

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – BALLET OF THE TWENTIETH
CENTURY – based here until 1987 – Nijinsky: Clown of God – company now based in
Lausanne, Switzerland

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – BELGIUM NATIONAL THEATRE

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS –
KONINKLIJKE VLAAMSE OPERA
– Royal Flemish Theatre, built 1883 – 1999-2005 major renovation – used for
drama performances by the resident company

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – LABORATOIRE VICINAL –
1970s

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS –
PALAIS DES BEAUX-ARTS/PALEIS
VOOR SCHONE KUNSTEN
– "Palace of Fine Arts", built 1922-1929 – complex
includes a large concert hall and exhibition space – used for concerts, theatre
performances, as a cinema, and for art exhibitions; Salle Henri Le Boeuf:
Concert hall, built 1922-1929 – various alterations. 1999 renovations – 2510
seats

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS –
THEATRE DE L’ALHAMBRA
demolished

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS –THEATRE
DE LA MONNAIE/MUNTSCHOUWBURG
– 1st theatre built 1700 on a neighbouring site
as "Grand Théâtre de la Monnaie – Demolished 1820; 2nd theatre built 1816-1819
as "Théâtre Royal" on a neighbouring site – Destroyed by a fire 1855; Current
theatre built 1855-1856, on the site of the 2nd theatre, using the portico of
the 2nd theatre – Stage house collapse in the 19th century, re-built in the
1950s. 1985-1986 major exterior and interior rebuilding and renovation by
A.2R.C., originally 1200, today 1770 seats

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – THEATRE DE POCHE – 1950

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – THEATRE DES GALERIES –
1846

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – THEATRE MOLIERE – 1867

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – THEATRE ROYAL DU PARC –
Built 1782 – 2000 major renovation – used for drama performances in French

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS – THEATRE ROYALE DE LA
MONNAIE – 1st theatre built 1700 on a neighbouring site as "Grand Théâtre de la
Monnaie" – demolished 1820; 2nd theatre built 1816-1819 as "Théâtre Royal", on a
neighbouring site – Destroyed by a fire 1855; [Current theatre built 1855-1856,
on the site of the 2nd theatre]

BELGIUM – BRUSSELS –

THEATRE ROYAL SCHOUWBERG

BELGIUM – CHARLEROI –

THEATRE
– Also known as "Eden Theatre"

BELGIUM – GHENT –

DE VLAAMSE OPERA
- Built 1838-1840 as "Grand théâtre royal" on the site of
the former "Théâtre St. Sébastien" (built 1737, demolished 1837) – 1887 major
interior alterations – 1910 extension by a functional building opened 1840. Ca –
1945 restorations. Closed 1989 due to a lack of fire security – 1991-1993 major
restoration and modernization. Re-opened 1993 – original capacity: 1800 – 2000
persons – one of the homes of the opera company "De vlaamse Opera"

BELGIUM – GHENT –

PUBLIEKSTHEATER
– Built as "Koninklijke Nederlandse Schouwburg" – also known
as "Théatre Flamand" and "Nederlandschtheater" – 1987-1993 major renovations –
2001 renamed "Publiekstheater – Groot Huis"

BELGIUM – GHENT –

TONEEL EXPO 1913
– open-air stage built 1913 for the Wereldtentoonstelling
(World Exposition) – part of the Oud Vlaendren (Old Flanders) exhibition

BELGIUM – LEUVEN –

SCHOUWBURG
– ruined by war

BELGIUM – LIEGE –

THEATRE ROYAL

BELGIUM – LIEGE – GRAND THEATRE – opened 1820

BELGIUM – LIEGE – theatre since 1702

BELGIUM – LIEGE – THEATRE LA DOUANE – built
1767

BELGIUM – LIEGE – THEATRE ROYAL – Opened 1820
– home of the Opéra Royal de Wallonie. 1246 seats

BELGIUM – MECHELEN –

STADSSCHOUWBURG
– Built from 1477 as the palace of Margaret of York, on the
site formerly occupied by the palace of the bishops of Cambrai – 1486 sold to
the city of Mechelen – used as a palace by the Habsburg princess, Margaret of
Austria – 1611 ceded to the Jesuites – after the the elimination of the Jesuite
religious order, used as a home for retired or invalid soldiers- later converted
to a theatre

BELGIUM – MONS –

THEATRE ROYAL
– Built 1841-1843 – 1947-1952 interior renovations -1996-1997
interior renovations – 2000 exterior renovations

BELGIUM – NAMUR –

SALLE DES FETES, MALONNE
– Built as part of the "Institut Saint-Berthuin"
boarding school – demolished

BELGIUM – NAMUR –

THEATRE D’ETE CITADELLE
– outdoor theatre

BELGIUM – NAMUR –

THEATRE ROYAL
– 1994-1998 major restoration – complex includes a main
auditorium (850 seats), a smaller hall (150 seats), and a conference hall (120
seats).

BELGIUM – OOSTENDE –

KONINKLIJKE SCHOUWBURG

BELGIUM – OOSTENDE –

KURSAAL

BELGIUM – POPERINGE –

SCHOUWBURG
– building is currently used by the Nationaal Hopmuseum (National
Hop Museum)

BELGIUM – SPA –

KURSAAL

BELGIUM – SPA –

THEATRE EN PLEIN AIR
– open air theatre

BELGIUM – TOURNAI –

SALLE DES CONCERTS

BELGIUM – TOURNAI –

THEATRE

BELGIUM – VERVIERS –

GRAND THEATRE
– built 1890-1892 – 300 seats

BELGIUM – VERVIERS –

SOCIETE D’HARMONIE
– Built 1833-1835

BELGIUM – VEURNE –

SSHOUWBURG

BRAZIL – BELEM –

TEATRO DE PAZ
– opera house 1874

 

BRAZIL – BLUMENAU –
TEATRO GOMES – Built
1935-1939 for the "Sociedade Dramático Musical Carlos Gomes" (formerly "Sociedade
Teatral Frohsinn") – 1968 addition of a smaller stage – in the 1990s, main stage
restored and renamed "Auditório Heinz Geyer" – 1996-1996 small stage rebuilt and
renamed "Auditório Willy Sievert"

BRAZIL – BRASILIA –
TEATRO NACIONAL – Built
1960-1965 – complex includes two theatres (an opera house and a drama theatre)

BRAZIL – CURITIBA –
TEATRO GUAIRA

BRAZIL – FORTALEZA –
TEATRO JOSE DE ALENCAR
Built 1908-1910 – 1974-1975 renovations – 1989-1990 renovations

BRAZIL – MANAUS –
TEATRO AMAZONAS – Built
1881-1896 – After the decline of the rubber trade, opera seasons stop in 1907 –
renovations in 1929, 1974, 1987-1990. Re-opened 1990 – restored 1996 – 700 seats
– Amazonas Opera Festival started 1997

BRAZIL – OURO PRETO – MUNICIPAL THEATRE

BRAZIL – PIRENOPOLIS – MUNICIPAL THEATRE

BRAZIL – PORTO ALEGRE –
TEATRO SAO PEDRO

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – REAL TEATRO DE SAO
JOAO (1813-24)

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – CENTRO CULTURAL
BANCO DO BRASIL – Rua Primeiro de Marco 66

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – IMPERIAL ACADEMIA DE
MUSICA E OPERA NACIONAL – (1857-65)

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – TEATRO COLONI – 1910

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO –
TEATRO LYRICO – Built
1871 as "Theatro Dom Pedro II" – 1875 renamed "Theatro Imperial Dom Pedro II" –
1890 enamed "Theatro Lyrico" – 1400 seats – demolished in 1934

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO –
TEATRO MAISON DE FRANCE
They’re Playing Our Song March 2009;

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL – 1909
– was main opera house until 1960 – 2357 seats

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – TEATRO RECREIO – E de Outro Mundo

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO –
TEATRO SAO PEDRO DE
ALCANTARA
– 1st theatre on the site built 1813 as "Real Teatro de São João"
– destroyed by a fire; 2nd theatre built 1826 as "Imperial Theatro São Pedro de
Alcântara" – 1831 renamed "Theatro Constitucional Fluminense" – 1839 renamed "Theatro
São Pedro de Alcântara" – Destroyed by fire 1851; 3rd theatre built 1852 as "Theatro
São Pedro de Alcântara"- destroyed by fire 1856; 4th theatre built 1856-1857 as
"Theatro São Pedro de Alcântara" – 1916 rebuilt – 1923 renamed "Teatro João
Caetano" – demolished in 1929 in favour of a new theatre building; 5th theatre
built 1929 as "Teatro João Caetano" – 1986 major renovations and alterations

BRAZIL – RIO DE JANEIRO – URCA CASINO – built 1933 – Carmen Miranda – 1946 Federal ban on casinos – closed – 2006 being renovated

BRAZIL – SABARA – MUNICIPAL THEATRE

BRAZIL – SALA – Auditorium – converted railway
station

BRAZIL – SALVADOR–
TEATRO CASTRO ALVES

BRAZIL – SAO JOAO – SAO JOAO THEATRE

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO – BRASILEIRO DE COMEDIA –
Rua Major Diorgo 311

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO – CINE METRO – 1938 – now
houses Evangelical church

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL – Built
1911 – 1750 seats

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO –
TEATRO SANTA HELENA

BRAZIL – SAO PAULO – TEATRO SERGIO CARDUSON –
Rua Rui Barbose

BRAZIL – SAO PEDRO – SAO PEDRO THEATRE

BULGARIA – GABROVO –
DOM NA KULTURATA

BULGARIA – KARNOBAT –
TEATR

BULGARIA – LOVECH –
TEATR

BULGARIA – PLOVDIV –
TEATR – founded 1953

BULGARIA – RUSE –
DRAMAT. TEATR SAWA OGNJANOW
– founded 1949

BULGARIA – SOFIA –
NATIONAL THEATRE
opened 1907 – 1021 seats – Stage house destroyed by fire 1923 (auditorium also
damaged) – 1923-1928 building of a newly constructed stage house and altered
auditorium – 1972-1976 renovation of the stage house and exterior to the
original plans

BULGARIA – SOFIA –
NATIONALNA OPERA I BALET

BULGARIA – STARA ZAGORADRAMAT.
TEATR GEO MILEV
– Built 1914-1919 – nationalized in 1954 – used for drama
performances by the resident company

BULGARIA – STARA ZAGORAOPERATA
– founded 1946

BULGARIA – VARNA –
DVORETS NA SPORTA I
KULTURATA

BULGARIA – VARNA –
NATIONALEN TEATR
founded 1947

BULGARIA – VELINGRAD –
TEATR

BULGARIA – VIDIN –
TEATR

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

C

CHILE – IQUIQUE –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL
Opened 1890

CHILE – PISAGUA –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL – built
1892 as part of a complex combining a theatre, a market hall, and the city hall

CHILE – PUNTA ARENAS –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL – Built
1897-1899 as "Teatro Colón" – 1905 donated to the city of Punta Arenas and
renamed "Teatro Municipal"

CHILE – SANTIAGO DE CHILE – CINE METRO – 1939
for MGM films – 1979 closed and razed

CHILE – SANTIAGO DE CHILE –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL DE SANTIAGO
– Built 1853-1857 – destroyed by a fire 1870 that broke out during a concert –
subsequently rebuilt largely to the original plans. Re-opened 1873 – Main
auditorium: 1500 seats, concert hall "Sala Claudio Arrau": 250 seats

CHILE – VALPARAISO –
TEATRO DE LA VICTORIA
destroyed by an earthquake in 1906

CHINA – BEIJING – CREATIVE BEIJING – giant
entertainment project that will contain 32 theaters when construction is
complete will rival the West End and Broadway, with some of the world’s top
musicals such as "Fame" and "The Lion King" running year-round – main theater
will seat 2,000 with the others accommodating auds of between 300 and 500 –
Creative Beijing will be home to a complex of theaters for musicals in the
Haidian district in the capital’s northwestern suburbs. Local media have already
dubbed it "China’s Broadway," and it will be Asia’s biggest base for the
production of musicals

CHINA – BEIJING – CUANGHE THEATRE – oldest
opera hall, built during Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) will be torn down to make way
for modern theatre – declared unsafe in 2000 – initially villa of rich salt
merchant, rebuilt several times, most recently 1955

CHINA – BEIJING – NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE
PERFORMING ARTS -see National Grand Theatre opened Dec 2007 – concert hall, opera house and theatre –
largest performing arts centre in the world

CHINA – BEIJING – NATIONAL GRAND THEATRE/NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS – known as “The Egg,” – opened Dec 2007 with three main halls which include the 2,416 seat opera house, 2,017 seat concert hall with pipe organ and 1,040 seat theatre for plays other than the opera house

CHINA – BEIJING – PEOPLE’S ART THEATER MUSEUM
– 2007 – country’s first museum dedicated to modern Chinese drama – first "hua
ju" was introduced from the West in 1907 – museum has about 700 photos, 400
paper documents and more than 1,000 other exhibits, including costumes from a
Chinese version of "Death of a Salesman" and a number of props

CHINA – CANTON – THEATRE fire May 1845 – 1,670 people killed

CHINA – DALIAN –
THEATRE

CHINA – GUANGZHOU – Guangzhou Opera House,
under construction as of January 2005, will be one of China’s biggest theaters,
with 1,800 seats – scheduled to open in Spring 2010 with large hall for operas and concert hall for recitals – plans to renovate and rebuild a
number of the city’s existing theaters, in an attempt to improve the city’s
cultural life

CHINA – HONG KONG –
CHUNG
YING THEATRE COMPANY

CHINA –
DISNEYLAND

CHINA – HONG KONG – HONG KONG ACADEMY FOR
PERFORMING ARTS LIBRARY – 1 Gloucester Road

CHINA – HONG KONG –
HONG
KONG PLAYERS

CHINA – HONG KONG –

KO SHAN THEATRE
– Ko Shan Road Park

 

CHINA – HONG KONG – LYRIC THEATRE – Hong Kong
Academy for Performing Arts

CHINA – HONG KONG/XIANGGANG –
MANDARIN THEATRE RESTAURANT

CHINA – KAMLI – THEATRE – fire 1893 – 1,995 people killed

CHINA – LANGFANG – Cultural Arts Centre – a city outside of Bejing will soon get a $323 million musical center- an investment made by Ovation Cultural Development group and the local government of Hebei province. Set to open in 2017, the 1 million square-foot facility will include not only theatres, but other arts related ares. Before the project is completed, the new company will present a Mandarin version of Into the Woods, which will play Langfang in Novemer before embarking on a Chinese tour.

CHINA – MACAU – MGM GRAND MACAU – opened
December 2007

CHINA – MACAU –
VENETIAN CASINO – opened Aug 2007 –
world’s largest casino

CHINA – PEAR GARDEN – AD20 – first school of
drama

CHINA – PEKING OPERA – performed in primitive
theatres erected in villages and temple fairs – most popular form of theatrical
entertainment

CHINA – SHANGHAI – THEATRE – fire June 1871 – 900 people killed

CHINA – SHANGHAI – GREAT WORLD ENTERTAINMENT
CENTRE – opened in the 1920s as an even bigger complex of buildings putting on
every conceivable kind of entertainment. It now consists of four floors with two
auditoriums on each

CHINA – SHANGHAI – LYCEUM THEATRE – home to
British Amateur Dramatic Society

CHINA – SHANGHAI – MAJESTIC THEATER (Mei Qi
Theater) – One of Shanghai’s oldest theatres

CHINA – SHANGHAI –
SHANGHAI CONCERT HALL
Built 1930 as "Nanking Theatre" on the site of a former cemetery – originally
used as a cinema – 1949 renamed "Beijing Movie Theatre"- 1959 renamed "Shanghai
Concert Hall"/"Shanghai Yinyueting" – since 1959, used for symphonic concerts.
2002-2003 the whole building is moved to the South – 1122 seats

CHINA – SHANGHAI –
SHANGHAI
GRAND THEATER – OLD AND NEW
– Cinema, built 1933 – current "Shanghai Grand
Theatre" is an opera house built in 1998 – performances of Western and Chinese
opera, ballet and drama performances, and symphonic concerts – 1895 seats –
Phantom of the Opera Dec. 2004; new theatre being built to house major musicals
in Cantonese – Lion King 2006; Les Miz 2007;

CHINA – SHANGHAI – YIFU THEATER

CHINA – SPRING WILLOW SOCIETY – started 1907
in Tokyo and brought to China

CHINA – WUHAN –
THEATRE

CHINA – XI’AN – SH AAN XI QINHUANG GRAND THEATER PERFORMING ARTS COMPANY – opens Spring 2014 – 2,000 seats – part of Nederlander theatres

COLUMBIA – BARRANQUILLA –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL

COLUMBIA – BOGATA –
TEATRO COLON – Built
1890 – home to the Orquesta Sinfónica de Colombia

COLUMBIA – CARTAGENA –
TEATRO MUNICIPAL

COLUMBIA – CARTAGENA –
TEATRO RIALTO

COSTA RICA, SAN JOSE –

TEATRO NACIONAL
– Opened 1897 by a French opera company – 1962 restorations
– from 1991 structural repairs after earthquakes in 1990 and 1991 – home to the
Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional and the Compañía Nacional de Danza – used for opera,
ballet, and drama performances and for classical concerts

COSTA RICA – SAN JOSE –
TEATRO RAVENTOS

*CROATIA – DUBROVNIK-
CROATIAN
NATIONAL THEATRE
– established 1860 – 1967 major reconstruction

CROATIA – DUBROVNIK –
KAZALISTE M. DRZIC
1863

CROATIA – HVAR –
KAZALISTE KOMUNALNO
built 1612 on the first floor of the old Arsenal – best surviving example of an
early 17th century Venetian public theatre

CROATIA – KARLOVAC –
DOM KULTURE

CROATIA – OPATIJA –
KAZALISTE

CROATIA – RIJEKA –
HRVATSKO NARODNO KAZALISTE
I. ZAJC
– Built 1883-1885 as "Stadttheater" (later: "Teatro Verdi") for the
city of Fiume – later renamed "Teatro Verdi" – later renamed in honour of the
Croatian composer Ivan Zajc – 1981 renovation and alterations – 1240 seats

CROATIA – SPLIT –
HRVATSKO NARODNO KAZALISTE
– Croatian National Theatre – built 1893

CROATIA – VARAZDIN –
HRVATSKO NARODNO KAZALISTE
– Built 1871-1873 as "Stadttheater und Redoute"/"Gradsko kazaliste" for the city
of Varazdin – complex includes a theatre, ballroom, café and restaurant –
conversion of the café and restaurant into a public library – In the 1980s,
extension of the orchestra pit and alterations of interior decoration to modern
designs – 600 seats

CROATIA – ZAGREB –
HRVATSKI GLAZBENI ZAVOD
– "Croatian Music Institute" conservatory and concert hall

CROATIA – ZAGREB –
HRVATSKO NARODNO KAZALISTE
– Built 1894-1895 as "Königlich Kroatisches Landes- und Nationaltheater" – 1200
seats – 1952 building of an underground air-raid shelter -1965-1969 interior
modernization (inlcuding conversion of the 1952 shelter into a buffet) – 800
seats

CUBA – CIENFUEGOS –
TEATRO T. TERRY – 1st
theatre on the site built 1840 as "Teatro Isabel II" – demolished 1887 in favour
of the current theatre; 2nd Theatre built 1887-1888 – opened 1890 – restored
1965 – remodelled 1984 – 887 seats

CUBA – HAVANA –
CABARET SANS SOUCI
Night club and casino

CUBA, HAVANA – CAFE TEATRO BRECHT – Calle 13
and I – variety shows

CUBA, HAVANA – Capri Hotel and Casino – headline stars – George Raft lived in hotel – ended 1959 with revolution – recently restored

CUBA, HAVANA – EL SONATO – Calle K, between
Calles 19 and 21 – contemporary plays

CUBA, HAVANA –
GRAN TEATRO DE LA HABANA –
SALA GARCIA LORCA
– located in front of Parque Central, Avenida Paseo del
Prado, at the corner of Calle San Rafael – Built 1908-1914 as "Gran Teatro de
Tacón" (also known as "Teatro Nacional" and "Palacio del Centro Gallego"), at
the site of the previous "Gran Teatro de Tacón" (built 1838, demolished 1908).
Later renamed in honour of Federico García Lorca – home to the "Ballet Nacional
de Cuba"

CUBA, HAVANA –
GRAN TEATRO DE TACON (OLD)
– Opened 1838 – demolished 1908 in favour of the new "Gran Teatro de Tacón"
(also known as "Teatro Nacional", "Palacio del Centro Gallego", current name: "Gran
Teatro de La Habana – Sala García Lorca")

CUBA, HAVANA – GUINOL – Calle M, between
Calles 19 and 21 – marionette shows

CUBA, HAVANA – MELLA THEATRE – Linea #657,
between A and B, or Avenida 1, between calles 8 and 10 – variety and dance shows

CUBA, HAVANA – Rex Cinema 1947 – Duplex 530
seats incorporated into 1938 Rex Cinema

CUBA, HAVANA – SALA-TEATRO HUBERT DE BLANCK –
Calle Calzada, between Calles A and B, Vedado – classic and contemporary music
concerts

CUBA, HAVANA –
TEATRO ALBISU – Opened
1870

CUBA, HAVANA – TEATRO AMERICA – Avenida de
Italia #253, between Concordia and Neptuno in Centro Habana – vaudeville variety
shows

CUBA, HAVANA – TEATRO KARL MARX – Avenida 1,
between Calles 8 and 10 – National and international variety shows

CUBA, HAVANA –
TEATRO MARTI – Built
1884 as "Teatro Irioja" – 1901 renamed "Teatro Marti"

CUBA, HAVANA – TEATRO NACIONAL – Calle Paseo,
at the corner of Calle 39, on the Plaza de la Revolucion – Symphony, plays,
national and international variety shows

CUBA, HAVANA – TEATRO PRINCIPAL – 1810-32

CUBA, HAVANA – Tropical – open air dance club
on outskirts of Havana, originally a brewery – club took off in 1940s with black
clientele not allowed in white clubs in Havana

CUBA, MATANZAS –
TEATRO SAUTO – Built
1863

CUBA – SANTA CLARA –
TEATRO SAUTO – built
1885

CYPRUS – FAMAGUSTASALAMIS
THEATRON
– ancient Roman theatre

CYPRUS –
KOURION
AMPHITHEATRE
– built end opf 2nd c. AD – 3,500 seats – restored 1961 and now
used for performances

CYPRUS – LEFKESOLI
THEATRON
– ancient Roman theatre

CYPRUS – LEMESOS/LIMASSOLSALAMIS
THEATRON
– 3,500 seats – Ancient Greek theatre, built in the late 2nd
century BC – rebuilding in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD – abandoned in the 4th
century AD

CZECH REPUBLIC – AS-
KINO APOLLO – cinema,
built as "Lichtspieltheater" – later renamed "Kino Apollo"

CZECH REPUBLIC – BANSKA BYSTRICA – opera house

CZECH REPUBLIC – BOHUMIN –
KINO

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRATISLAVA – MUNICIPAL
THEATRE – 1920 became National Theatre

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRATISLAVA – theatre built
1886 as Opera House– renovated 1970-2

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO – GERMAN THEATRE –
became Mahen Theatre

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO – JANACEK THEATRE –
built 1945-1965 – used for opera and ballet performances by the resident
companies, and for concerts by the Brno Philharmonic Orchestra – 1317 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO –
JANACKOVA OPERA – 1882

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO –
MANENOVO DIVADLO – Built
1881-1882 as "Deutsches Stadttheater" for the city of Brünn at the site of a
previous theatre (built 1771, destroyed by a fire in 1870) – 1250 seats – first
fully electrical lighting system on the European continent – since 1918, home to
the local Czech opera company and renamed "Divadlo na hradbách" (Theatre on the
Ramparts). Also known as "Narodní divadlo" (National Theatre). During German
occupation 1939-1945 used for German and Czech performances. 1945 renamed
Janáckova Opera, 1946 renamed Janáckovo Divadlo. After the building of a new
opera house in 1965, mainly used for drama performances and renamed –
renovation. 1987 opening of "Diavdélko na hradbách", a studio theatre under main
stage of the theatre

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO – REDUTA THEATRE – 1600

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO – THEATRE ON THE
RAMPARTS – 1882

CZECH REPUBLIC – BRNO – VEVERI THEATRE –
bombed and demolished

CZECH REPUBLIC – BUDEJOVICE – opera house

CZECH REPUBLIC – CASLAV –
DUSIKOVO DIVADLO – Built
1867-1869 as "Mestské Divadlo" – later renamed

CZECH REPUBLIC – CERVENY KOSTELEC –
DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – CESKE – opera house

CZECH REPUBLIC – CESKE BUDEJOVICE –
JIHOCESKE DIVADLO – 257
seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – CESKY KRUMLOV –
LETNI DIVADLO – Open-air
summer theatre in the Palace Park

CZECH REPUBLIC – CESKY KRUMLOV –
ZAMECKE DIVADLO – Palace
theatre, built 1765-1766 on the site of a previous theatre building (built
1680-1683, closed ca. 1719) – 200 seats – Closed 1897. 1956-1964 used for
performances by Southern Bohemian Theatre Festival – 1966-2000 renovations –
theatre still houses complete original stage technology, a complete original
collection of stage sets

CZECH REPUBLIC – CESKY KRUMLOV – castle about
100 miles from Prague – contains small theatre – built 1766

CZECH REPUBLIC – CHEB –
FESTSPIELHALLE

CZECH REPUBLIC – CHEB –
ZAPADOCESKE DIVADLO
Built 1873-1874 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Eger – 1000 seats.

CZECH REPUBLIC – CHOMUTOV –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
as "Städtische Parksäle" for the city of Komotau – used for theatre
performances, concerts, and other events. Great Hall: 500 seats, Small Hall: 100
seats, Banquet Salon: 80 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – CHRUDIM –
MESTSKE DIVADLO K. PIPPICHA
– Built 1931-1934

CZECH REPUBLIC –

CZECH THEATRES

CZECH REPUBLIC – DUCHOV –
KINO LIPA – Cinema,
built 1928-1929 as "Städtische Lichtspiele" – 470 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – FRANTISKOVY LAZNE –
MESTSKE DIVADLO (OLD AND
NEW)
– Built 1868-1869 – demolished in 1927 – new built 1927-1928

CZECH REPUBLIC – HEJNICE –
JEDERMANN-FESTSPIELE
Open-air theatre in front of the Bazilika Navstívení Panny Marie church

CZECH REPUBLIC – HRONOV –
JIRASKOVO DIVADLO
Built 1928-1930 – since 1931, used for performances by Europe’s oldest amateur
theatre festival "Jiráskuv Hronov" [Jirásek's Hronov], and for theatre
performances throughout the year

CZECH REPUBLIC – JABLONEC NAD NISOU – MESTSKE
DIVADLO – Built 1906-1907 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Gablonz – 585 seats,
236 standing – 1945 renamed "Divadlo Julia Fucika" – renovations in 1964-1965
and 1995-1998 – 1998 renamed "Mestské divadlo" (Municipal Theatre)

CZECH REPUBLIC – JICIN – MRNAKOVO DIVADLO –
built 1923

CZECH REPLUBLIC – JIRKOV – KINO JIRKOV –
cinema, built as "Invaliden-Tonfilm-Theater" – later renamed "Kino Jirkov"

CZECH REPUBLIC – KAMENICKY SENOV –
MESTSKE KINO – Cinema
and theatre, built 1927 as "Stadtkino"

CZECH REPUBLIC – KARLOVY VARY –
GRANDHOTEL PUPP SLAVNOSTNI
SAL
– Built ca. 1897 as a hotel ballroom – 1951 hotel renamed "Grandhotel
Moskva" – 1989 re-renamed "Grandhotel Pupp"- used for classical and jazz
concerts, congresses, conferences, balls and various other events

CZECH REPUBLIC – KARLOVY VARY –
LETNI KINO – open air
cinema

CZECH REPUBLIC – KARLOVY VARY –
METSKE DIVADLO – Built
1884-1886 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Karlsbad at the site of the
demolished theatre of 1787 – 1910-1912 rebuilding of stage and auditorium – 1928
interior alterations – Renamed in favour of the Czech poet, Vítezslav Nezval –
1970-1978 renovation (stucco, painting, curtain) – 1996 renovation of the
curtain – major renovation 199?-1999 – 850 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – KLADNO –
STREDOCESKE DIVADLO
Built 1910-1911

CZECH REPUBLIC – KOLIN NAD LABEM –
MESTSKE DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – KRNOV –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
1927-1928 as theatre and cinema "Licht- und Schauspielhaus" for the city of
Jägerndorf – also known as "Stadttheater" – 800 seats, later 1009 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – KUTNA HORA –
TYLOVO DIVADLO – built
1933

CZECH REPUBLIC – JABLONEC NAD NISOU –
MESTSKE DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – JICIN –
MRNAKOVO DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – JIRKOV –
KINO JIRKOV

CZECH REPUBLIC – KOSICE – opera house

CZECH REPUBLIC – LETOHRAD –
METSKE DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – LIBEREC –
DIVADLO F.X. SALDY
Built 1881-1883 "Stadttheater" for the city of Reichenberg – Later renamed
"Severóceské divadlo" – Later renamed "Divadlo Frantiska Xavera Saldy" – 1970
major renovation – 824 seats (+ 132 standing)

CZECH REPUBLIC – LITOMYSL –
ZAMECKE DIVADLO – Castle
theatre, also known as "Zámecké Divadelko" (Small Castle Theatre), located in
the ground floor of the West wing – Built 1796-1798 at the site of a previous
theatre (destroyed by a fire) – used for modern drama, performed by members of
the ducal family – Since 1949 used for opera performances and concerts during
the "Smetanova Litomysl" summer festival – 133 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – LOKET NAD OHRI –
OPEN-AIR THEATRE

CZECH REPUBLIC – OLOMOUC – opera house

CZECH REPUBLIC – MARIANSKE LAZNE –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
1866-1868 – rebuilt ca. 1904 – 450 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – MLADA BOLESLAV –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
1906-1909 as "Mestské divadlo/Stadttheater" (municipal theatre) for the city of
Mladá Boleslav/Jungbunzlau – 1966 renamed "Divadlo Jaroslava Prucha" – 1976
closed because of dilapidation – 1982-1985 major exterior and interior
renovation – 1994 renamed "Mestské divadlo"

CZECH REPUBLIC – MOST –
MESTSKE DIVADLO (OLD)
Built 1910 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Brüx by Graf – 750 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – NOVY BOR –
MESTSKE KINO – Built as
"Stadtlichtspiele".

CZECH REPUBLIC – OPAVA –
SLEZSKE DIVADLO – Built
1882-1883 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Troppau as a major reconstruction of
the former theatre (built 1804-1805) – 800 seats – damaged by a fire 1909 –
restored – 1948 major exterior reconstruction, destroying the neo-Renaissance
1883 façade – 1955-1957 – renamed "Divadlo Zdenka Nejedlého" – 1990-1992 major
reconstruction, reconstruction of the original 1882 façade. Used for opera and
drama performances by the resident "Slezské Divadlo" [Silesian Theatre]
companies

CZECH REPUBLIC – OSTRAVA –
DIVADLO ANTONINA DVORAK
– Built 1905-1907 by Alexander Graf as "Stadttheater" for the city of
Mährisch-Ostrau – Until 1919, used by a German theatre company – since 1919,
used by the Czech company "Národní Divadlo Moravskoslezské" (National
Moravian-Silesian Theatre) – bombed WWII – 1945 renamed "Zemské divadlo"
(Provincial Theatre) – 1949 renamed "Divadlo Zdenka Nejedlého" – 1954-1956
rebuilding with façade alteration – 1969-1971 extension – 1990 renamed "Divadlo
Antonína Dvoráka" – 1999-2000 renovations – originally 854 seats, today 531
seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – OSTRAVA – NATIONAL HOUSE –
built 1894

CZECH REPUBLIC – OSTRAVA – opera house 1908

CZECH REPUBLIC – PARDUBICE–
VYCHODOCESKE DIVADLO
Built 1907-1909 as "Mestské Divadlo" [Municipal Theatre] – Later renamed
"Východoceské Divadlo" [Eastern Bohemain Theatre]

CZECH REPUBLIC – PISEK –
MESTSKE DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – PLZEN –
DIVADLO ANTONINA DVORAK
– Built 1898-1902 as "Mestské divadlo/Stadttheater" for the city of Plzen/Pilsen
– 1001 seats – renamed

CZECH REPUBLIC – PLZEN –
DEUTSCHES THEATER
Opened 1869 – 1909 renovation – 700 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – POLICKA –
TYLUV DUM – Built
1927-1929 – Used for an annual music festival "Martinu Fest", held every October

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
BERTRAMKA

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – BOUDA (OR HUT)
THEATRE – 1786-1789

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – CZECH PROVISIONAL
THEATRE – 1862

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
DIVADLO KOLOWRAT

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
DIVADLO MINOR (OLD)
Built 1924 as "Kleine Bühne des Deutschen Theaters" – used for German drama
performances – 1948 renamed "Ústrední loutkové divadlo" [Central Puppet Theatre]
and used as a puppet theatre – 1991 renamed "Divadlo Minor"- 400 seats.
Demolished in 1999 – The puppet theatre company moved to a new "Divadlo Minor"
at another site in ul. Vodickova in 2001

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
DIVADLO NA VINOHRADECH
Built 1904-1907 – Used for opera and drama performances by the resident
companies – since 1919, exclusively used for drama performances – Since 1922,
operated by the city of Praha. Closed 1941-1943. 1943 seized by German troops,
subsequently used as a movie studio. Since 1945, again used by the resident
drama company. 1950-1960 operated by the Czechoslovak Army and renamed "Theatre
of the Czechoslovak Army". Since 1960, again operated by the city of Praha –
1965 re-renamed "Divadlo na Vinohradech"

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – DRAMA CLUB THEATRE –
1965

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – ESTATES THEATRE

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – FREE (OR UNFETTERED)
THEATRE

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
NARODNI DIVADLO

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
NOVA SCENA/LATERNA MAGIKA

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –

NATIONAL THEATRE
1881 – banks of Vltava – burned down 2 months later –
reopened 1883 – Laterna Magika originated here 1958

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – NEW GERMAN THEATRE –
1888-1945 – after war became Theatre of the 5 May and from 1949 as the Smetana
Theatre – along with Tyl Theatre, became part of National Theatre Complex –
renovated 1973 to 1976

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – NARODNI DIVADLO –
Czech National Theatre, built 1868-1881 – Completely destroyed by a fire 1881.
Rebuilt 1881-1883 – Re-opened 18 November 1883 – 1977-1983 major renovation
(with addition of a new building for technical rooms, a restaurant, and a new
theatre, "Nová Scéna" – Re-opened 1983 – 1598 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – Národní Divadlo –
Nová Scéna / Laterna Magika – Built 1977-1983 by Karel Práger as an experimental
studio stage for the "Národní Divadlo". Used for performances by Josef Svoboda’s
"Laterna Magika" ensemble, combining projected pictures with live stage events

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – NOSTITZ THEATRE –
became Estates Theatre and in 1948 became Tyl Theatre

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
OBECNI DUM – Built
1905-1912 replacing an academy building and Saint Vojtech’s church – complex
contains a café, a restaurant, shops, several function rooms, and a concert hall
– 1994-1997 major renovation

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – PRAGUE CASTLE –
travelling companies 17th Century

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – PROVISIONAL THEATRE
– 1862

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – REALISTIC THEATRE

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
RUDOLFINUM – Built
1876-1884 as a concert hall and art gallery – Concert hall "Dvorákova sín" –
since 1896, home to the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra – 1918-1938 seat of the
Czechoslovak Parliament. 1919-1920 interior rebuilding for parliament use,
removal of the concert – In the 1940s renovations to a concert hall –
installation of second concert hall – home to the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra.
Gallery tract used by the local Conservatory and the Academy of Performing Arts.
1990-1992 major restoration. Subsequently again used as a concert hall and art
gallery

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
STATNI OPERA – Built
1886-1887 as "Neues Deutsches Theater" [New German Theatre] for "Deutscher
Theaterverein" at the site of the demolished wooden "Neustädter Sommertheater"
(1859-1886) – partially destroyed by bombs in 1945 – rebuilt and re-opened as
"Smetavono divadlo" in 1949 – 1968-1973 major renovation of the auditorium,
complete modernization 1980-1981. Renamed "Státní Opera" [State Opera] 1992.
Originally 2200, today 1046 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE –
STAVOVSKE DIVADLO
Built 1781-1783 as "Deutsches Nationaltheater" – Also known as
"Graf-Nositz-Theater / Hrabeci Nosticovo Divadlo". 1798 purchased by the
Bohemian Diet (a parliament of landed gentry) and renamed "Královské Stavovské
Divadlo / Königliches Ständetheater" (Royal Theatre of the Estates) – 1859
extension by an extra floor – from 1862 – exclusively for German performances.
Renamed "Königlich Deutsches Stadttheater" – 1920 re-renamed "Stavovské Divadlo"
and mainly used for drama by the Naródní Divadlo ensemble – 1948 renamed "Tylovo
divadlo" – 1982-1990 major renovations – 1990 re-renamed "Stavovské Divadlo" –
currently used for opera and ballet performances by the Naródní Divadlo
ensembles – 1600 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – THEATRE – built 1737

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – THEATRE BEHIND THE
GATE (1955-1972)

CZECH REPUBLIC –

PRAGUE THEATRES

CZECH REPUBLIC – PRAGUE – TYL THEATRE – 1783

CZECH REPUBLIC – ROZNOV POD RADHOSTEM –
MUSEUM OPEN-AIR STAGE

CZECH REPUBLIC – SOKOLOV –
MESTSKY DUM KULTURY
"Municipal Culture House", used for theatre and cinema performances, concerts,
and other events – formerly known as "Hornický dum kultury"

CZECH REPUBLIC – SUMPERK –
KINO OKO

CZECH REPUBLIC – TEPLICE-SANOV –
STADTTHEATER/MESTSKE DIVADLO
(OLD)
– Built 1872-1874 as "Stadttheater" / "Mestské Divadlo" – 800 seats –
destroyed by a fire 1919 – 1923-1924 the "Nové Divadlo" was built on the site

CZECH REPUBLIC – TEPLICE-SANOV –
NOVE DIVADLO (NEW)
Built 1923-1924 as "Neues Stadttheater" / "Nové Divadlo" on the site of the old
"Stadttheater" / "Mestské Divadlo" (destroyed by a fire in 1919) – complex
includes the main theatre (1135 seats), a concert hall (600 seats), a cinema,
and several restaurants, bars and cafes

CZECH REPUBLIC – TEPLICE-SANOV –
OLYMPIA-LICHTSPIELE

CZECH REPUBLIC –

THEATRES IN CZECH REPUBLIC

CZECH REPUBLIC – TRUTNOV –
KINO VESMIR

CZECH REPUBLIC – USTI NAD LABEM –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
1907-1908 as "Neues Stadttheater" for the city of Aussig – 1000 seats

CZECH REPUBLIC – VARNSDORF –
KINOKLUB

CZECH REPUBLIC – ZAGREB – NATIONAL THEATRE –
1863

CZECH REPUBLIC – ZAMBERK –
DIVISOVO DIVADLO – Built
May-Dec 1926

CZECH REPUBLIC – ZNOJMO –
MESTSKE DIVADLO – Built
1899-1900 as "Neues Stadttheater" – Later renamed "Jihomoravské divadlo" [South
Moravian Theatre] – Current name: "Mestské Divadlo" [Municipal Theatre]

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

D

DENMARK – AABENRAA –
TEATRET

DENMARK – AARHUS–
TEATRET

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
CHRISTIANSBORG HOFTEATRET
– Built 1767 for King Christian VII, in the first floor of the royal stables –
1842 rebuilt – closed 1881 due to insufficient fire safety- 1885 auction sale of
the furniture and theatre equipment. From 1922, used as Theatre Museum.
Subsequently extensively restored

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – CASINOTEATER

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
CHRISTIANSBORG HOFTEATRET

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN CONCERT HALL -2009

*DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
COPENHAGEN
INTERNATIONAL THEATER
- 1980

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DAGMARTEATRET – 1883 –
closed 1937 – demolished

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DANISH ROYAL OPERA –
1874

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DEN DANSKE SKUEPLADS –
1722 – became Kongelige Teater (Royal Theatre) – 1723 renovated

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DET KONGELIGE TEATER –
Opened 1874. 1300 seats

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DET NYE TEATER

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DET NY SCALA

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – FOLKETEATER

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
KONGELIGE TEATER (ROYAL
THEATRE)

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
NATIONAL SCALA
original building completed 1748 – altered 1772 – present site dates from 1874 –
and annexe theatre called Staerekassen (Starling Nest Box) acquired 1931

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
NY TEATER – Built
1907-1908 – Renovations in the 1990s. Re-opened 1994 – Used for operetta and
musical performances – 1000 seats

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – OPERAEN – Opening
January 2005 – new opera house faces Amalienborg Palace across harbour – 1400
seats – previously Royal Danish Theatre used for Royal Danish Opera Company

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – ROYAL DANISH THEATRE –
built 1874

*DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – ROYAL THEATRE –
founded 1722 – Royal Danish Ballet founded in the 1940s – see Kongelige Teater

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
SONDERBRO TEATER

*DENMARK – COPENHAGEN –
TIVOLI
GARDENS
– famed amusement park built 1843 – Benneweis Cirkus – permanent
circus – houses Koncertsalen (old) ; Koncertsalen (new); Pantomimeteatret –
Built 1874 with peacock curtain; Teatersalen – open Spring/Summer/Fall – and
about to open for 10 days in Fall with Hallowe’en theme to coincide with
students weeklong fall holiday

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – UTERUS THEATRE – founded 2007


DANISH THEATRES
– The Royal Theatre 1748 – new theatre built beside old one
in 1874

DENMARK – COPENHAGEN – DANISH
THEATRES

DENMARK – ESBJERG –
TEATRET

DENMARK – HOSTELBRO – ODIN TEATRET – moved in
1966 from Norway to Hostelbro

DENMARK – ODENSE –
FOLKETEATRET

DENMARK – ODENSE –
TEATRET

DENMARK – VEJLE –
TEATRET

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

E

ECUADOR – QUITO –
TEATRO NACIONAL – Built
1879-1887 – Since 1996 renovations

ECUADOR – QUITO –

THEATRE SUCRE

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA –
ALEXANDRIA OPERA
HOUSE
– see Zizinia Theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – AMIR THEATRE, formerly
Fox film theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – CINEMA RIALTO – film
theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – METRO THEATRE – film
house

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – MOHAMED ALI THEATRE – see
Zizinia Theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – RIO SUMMER GARDEN – film
theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA –

ROMAN THEATRON
– ancient Roman theatre – built 1st Century B.C.

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – SAYED DARWIN THEATRE –
see Zizinia Theatre

EGYPT – ALEXANDRIA – Zizinia Theatre – Rue
Rosette – built 1863 – Sarah Bernhardt 1907 – demolished 1916 – replaced 1928 by
Mohamed Ali Theatre, later changed to Sayed Darwin Theatre, now Alexandria Opera
House

EGYPT – BENI SUEF – CULTURE PALACE – during
performance of "Hamlet," fire killed 31 people Sept 2005 -building was left a
burned-out concrete husk with blackened walls

EGYPT – EL-ISKANDARIYAH –
ROMAN THEATRE – Ancient
Roman theatre, built in the 1st century BC.

EGYPT – CAIRO –
CAIRO OPERA HOUSE – visited March 2010
– beautiful interior, display of photos and costumes

EGYPT – CAIRO –
DAR ELOPERA AL MISRIA
Built 1869 replacing an older theatre building – 850 seats – Completely
destroyed by a fire in 1971

EGYPT – CAIRO – HANAGIR THEATRE – on Opera
House grounds

EGYPT – CAIRO – MGM THEATRE – Metro Cinema –
Egyptian premiere of Gone With the Wind 1940 – 1527 seats – 1952 destroyed by
fire and rebuilt

EGYPT – CAIRO – NATIONAL THEATRE – built 1935
– fire 2008

EGYPT – CAIRO –
OPERA HOUSE (NEW)
Built 1985-1988 on the former site of the Gezira Exhibition Grounds – Official
name "Centre for Education and Culture" – complex includes three theatres: the
main hall (opera and ballet performances, classical concerts; 1200 seats), a
small hall (film festivals, conferences; 500 seats), and an open-air theatre
(popular concerts; 600 seats) – complex also includes art galleries, music
library and opera museum – home to the Cairo Symphony Orchestra, the Cairo
Ballet Company, the Cairo Opera Company, the Cairo Opera Choir, and the National
Arabic Music Ensemble

EL SALVADOR – SAN SALVADOR –
TEATRO NACIONAL – Built
1917

ENGLAND – ALDEBURGH – SUFFOLK – ALDEBURGH
FESTIVAL – founded 1948

ENGLAND – ALDEBURGH – MALTINGS AT SNAPE –
converted to concert hall/opera house 1968 – burned down 1969 – rebuilt 1970

ENGLAND – ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – AYLESBURY – WATERSIDE THEATRE

ENGLAND – BASINGSTOKE –
HAYMARKET
THEATRE
– will shut from January to September yearly, a decision taken after
the Arts Council withdrew funding

ENGLAND – BATH –
ABC CINEMA

 

ENGLAND – BATH – ORCHARD STREET THEATRE

ENGLAND – BATH – THEATRE ROYAL – first theatre
built 1705 – in Lady Hawley’s Assembly Rooms – demolished 1737; 2nd Theatre
Royal on Orchard Street – 1751 – theatres amalgamated on Orchard Street – 1767
reconstructed and became Theatre Royal in 1768 – 1774 reconstruction – shell of
theatre still stands; 3rd – present Theatre Royal 1863 – 615 seats – on same
site – redecorated in 1892 and 1974

ENGLAND – BEDFORD – CIVIC THEATRE – at risk of demolition

BEXHILL-ON-SEA –
PAVILION THEATRE/KURSAAL

ENGLAND – BILLINGHAM –

FORUM THEATRE
– June/04 – Campaigners are marching to protest at
controversial development plans – Forum Theatre would be demolished to make way
for a supermarket as part of plans to regenerate the town centre

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – ALEXANDRA – built 1901
as Lyceum – 1927 became repertory theatre – renovated 1979 with seating of 1562

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – Alhambra Theatre – 1898 –
Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – ASTON HIPPODROME – 1908

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM –
BIRMINGHAM HIPPODROME
1899 – Birmingham Hippodrome, along with long-standing resident companies the
Birmingham Royal Ballet and DanceXchange, is laying plans to become an
international centre for dance 2009

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – BORDESLEY PALACE – 1899

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – COUTTS – 1863

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – EMPIRE PALACE THEATRE –
Atmospheric style– demolished

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – GAIETY MUSIC HALL – 1841

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – GRAND THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – HALL GREEN LITTLE THEATRE – 1951

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – HOLTE – 1879

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – KING’S

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – KING’S HALL – 1897

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – LADYWOOD PALACE – 1883

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – METROPOLE – 1885

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – OLD REP – 1913

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – PALACE OF DELIGHT – 1895

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – PRINCE OF WALES THEATRE
– destroyed 2nd World War – demolished

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM –
REPERTORY THEATRE
1920s and 1930s; Station Street – 1913 – new theatre opened 1971 in heart of
City Centre – 900 seats – studio theatre 160 seats

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – MIDLAND ARTS CENTRE –
1962 – 200 seats

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – Northfield Cinema –
Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – SYMPHONY HALL – classic
music scene has been transformed in past 20 years by number of symphony halls

ENGLAND – BIRMINGHAM – THEATRES – on Moor
Street and King Street 1750s and one on New Street 1774 which burnt down and
rebuilt 1791 – again destroyed by fire 1820 and rebuilt – demolished 1957

ENGLAND – BLACKBURN – THEATRE ROYAL – 1774; 2ND THEATRE ROYAL – 1893

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL – ABC – 1895

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL – ALHAMBRA – 1879

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL –
GRAND THEATRE (1st) – 1894
demolished; 2nd GRAND THEATRE – Victorian theatre in Lancashire has reopened
after a refurbishment – theatre had been closed for five weeks while new seats
and carpets were fitted

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL – NORTH PIER PAVILION – 1874

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL –
PALACE THEATRE

 

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL – TOWER BALLROOM – 1899

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL – TOWER CIRCUS – 1894

ENGLAND – BLACKPOOL –
WINTER GARDENS AND COMPLEX – 1875

 

ENGLAND – BOGNOR REGIS –
THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – BOLTON – GRAND THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – BOLTON –
NEW EMPIRE THEATRE

 

ENGLAND – BOLTON – OCTAGON THEATRE – 1967 –
opened with Annie and Fanny

ENGLAND – BOLTON – THEATRE ROYAL – demolished

ENGLAND – BOURNEMOUTH –
PAVILION

ENGLAND – BOURNEMOUTH – PAVILION DANCE CENTRE
– new dance venue to open 2010 – facility will feature performance spaces for
both professional and public use, plus a 190-capacity studio theatre. It is
being built as part of arts venue the Bournemouth International Centre and
Pavilion, to improve its 1,430-seat auditorium and ballroom – to house
Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and Dance South West

ENGLAND – BOURNEMOUTH –
PIER THEATRE – is to shut
2004

ENGLAND – BOURNEMOUTH – WINTER GARDENS –
69-year-old 2,000-seat venue was demolished in 2006

ENGLAND – BRADFIELD –
GREEK THEATRE

*ENGLAND – BRADFORD –

ALHAMBRA THEATRE

ENGLAND – BRADFORD –

GREEK THEATRE
– built 1888

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – ALHAMBRA THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – ASTORIA THEATRE – 1933

ENGLAND –

BRIGHTON THEATRES

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON –

CHURCHILL THEATRE

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – CINEWORLD – 8 screens
1991 as MGM – Virgin 1995 – UGC 1999 and Cineworld 2005

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON –
DOME CONCERT HALL AND PAVILION THEATRE – 1804-1808

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – GARDNER ARTS CENTRE – 1969

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – HIPPODROME – 1897

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – NIGHTINGALE THEATRE –
opening January 2004 – home to Prodigal Theatre

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON –
PALACE PIER THEATRE

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – PLAYHOUSE – 1891

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON –
REGENT CINEMA

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – THEATRE ROYAL – opened
1807 – 1200 seats – now 952 seats -Hamlet 1807

ENGLAND – BRISTOL –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – BRISTOL –

ASTORIA THEATRE

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – BURY

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – EMPIRE 1893

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – PEOPLE’S PALACE 1892

ENGLAND – BRISTOL –
PRINCE’S THEATRE

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – STOLL’S BRISTOL HIPPODROME
1911 – demolished in air raid 1940 – 2000 seats – became cinema in 1930s and
back to variety 1938 – 1948 stage area destroyed by fire

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – THEATRE in Park Row – 1867
– used for touring companies – New Theatre Royal – renamed Prince’s Theatre 1884

ENGLAND – BRISTOL –
THEATRE ROYAL – theatre
on King Street – 1766 – became Theatre Royal – and in 1943 – housed Bristol Old
Vic – main theatre seats 647 and studio theatre, New Vic – 1972 – 150 seats

ENGLAND – BRISTOL –
VICTORIA ROOMS

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – EDEN THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – HIPPODROME – demolished

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – RICHMOND THEATRE – Surrey
– pre-London runs

ENGLAND – BRIGHTON – SUSSEX – lst theatre on
North Street – 1774; 1790 one on Duke Street – which closed 1806 when theatre
was built on New Road – closed 1820 – reopened 1823 – demolished 1866 and built
Theatre Royal on same site in 1868 – 1000 seats

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – BRISTOL HIPPODROME – Sands
o’Dee

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – JACOB’S WELLS – first
permanent theatre built outside city boundary at Jacob’s Wells – 1729 – closed
1757 and abandoned 1765 – demolished 1803-26

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – LITTLE THEATRE – 1923

ENGLAND –

BRISTOL – OLD VIC
– She Stoops to Conquer 1943; Salad Days 1954

ENGLAND – BRISTOL – PRINCE’S THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – BROMLEY – CHURCHILL THEATRE – 750
seats

ENGLAND – BUCKINGHAMSHIRE –
MILTON KEYNES
THEATRE

ENGLAND – BURY ST. EDMUNDS –
THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – BUXTON –
BUXTON
OPERA HOUSE

 

ENGLAND – CAERLEON –
SITE OF ANCIENT
ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – ABC – 1860

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – ARTS THEATRE – 1936

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – Footlights Club –
amateur theatrical club – Hugh Laurie, Emma Thompson started to learn their
craft here, past of Cambridge University

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – FESTIVAL THEATRE – 1814 –
converted 1926

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – JUNCTION – 1990

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – NEW THEATRE – 1896 –
became cinema in early 1930s

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – THEATRE ROYAL – adapted
1882 from Old St. Andrew’s Hall – demolished 1896

ENGLAND – CAMBRIDGE – UNIVERSITY DRAMA STUDIO – 2004

ENGLAND – CAMDEN – JAZZ CAFE – Music and book
retailer HMV Group is to step into the UK’s £1 billion live music arena in
venture with the MAMA Group – move will see 11 music venues around the UK –
including the Jazz Cafe in Camden, Edinburgh’s the Picture House and the
Borderline in London – taken into joint ownership. Several venues, including the
5,100-seat Hammersmith Apollo, will be re-named with the HMV brand during the
ten-year deal

ENGLAND – CAMDEN TOWN –
PLAZA THEATRE – Built as a
cinema, briefly called the Plaza, now a video shop

ENGLAND – CANTERBURY –

GULBENKIAN THEATRE

ENGLAND – CANTERBURY – MARLOWE THEATRE –
Canterbury City Council has agreed to release funds so that architects can work
on designs next year for the Marlowe Theatre’s £24m overhaul – theatre is housed
in a 1920s cinema but soon only the shell will remain new 1200 seat theatre and
2nd producting and performing 150 seat second space being built

ENGLAND – CANTERBURY –
NEW IRON THEATRE

ENGLAND – CASTLEFORD – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – CHATHAM –
DICKENS WORLD – waterside
development split level attraction – 19th century London courtyard – Britannia
Theatre – devoted to Charles Dicken’s classic works

ENGLAND – CHATHAM –
THEATRE
ROYAL

ENGLAND – CHELMSFORD –
CIVIC
THEATRE

ENGLAND – CHELTONHAM –

EVERYMAN THEATRE

ENGLAND – CHESTER –

GATEWAY THEATRE
– as of 2005, in a few months time, the Gateway will be
demolished – closed March 2007 after almost 40 years, new performance art centre
to be ready in 2011

ENGLAND – ROYALTY – City Road – started life
as hut for workmen building the great General Railway Station at the top of City
Road – had been the Music Hall, which was already a cinema, and today is a shop
– every kind of entertainment from wrestling and variety to repertory and the
amateur operatic society – Marie Lloyd 1922 – By the 1980s Chester Royalty had
succumbed to television, and to the provision by the City council of the small
Gateway repertory theatre – building, with fewer than 600 seats, was quite
inadequate for major productions, symphony concerts or even the Gateway’s own
pantomime – capacity made life difficult for operatic and dance productions – A
year or so ago, Chester lost the Royalty altogether when it was finally
demolished and the site prepared for redevelopment.

ENGLAND –
CHICHESTER –
FESTIVAL THEATRE
– Oaklands Park – 1394 seats – 1962 under Laurence Olivier
– Goodbye Mr. Chips 1982; Let’s Do It 1994

ENGLAND – CLACTON-ON-SEA –
PALACE THEATRE

ENGLAND – COLCHESTER –
GRAND THEATRE
demolished

ENGLAND – COLCHESTER – HIPPODROME – other use

ENGLAND – CORNWALL – PORTHCURNO – MINACK
THEATRE – open air theatre near Penzance – from 1933-39 a play produced every 2
yers – during war covered with barbed wire – began again 1949 (600 seats)

ENGLAND – COVENTRY –
BELGRADE
THEATRE
– Half in Earnest 1958

ENGLAND – CRAWLEY –
HAWTH
THEATRE

ENGLAND – CRAYFORD –
PRINCESSES’ THEATRE
fire ruin

ENGLAND – CREWE – LYCEUM THEATRE – at risk of demolition

ENGLAND – DARTFORD –
ORCHARD THEATRE – 920 seats

ENGLAND – DERBY –

ACORN THEATRE

ENGLAND – DERBY – GRAND THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – DERBY HIPPODROME – Derby Hippodrome
struck by second fire in less than a year – at risk of demolition

ENGLAND –
DERBY
PLAYHOUSE
– part of Eagle Centre, opposite Eagle Centre Market – shows
cancelled as of December 2007, pending until see what it going to happen –
Beleaguered producing venue Derby Playhouse, which has been surrounded by
controversy since its closure 18 months ago, is to be taken over by the city
council and rebranded Derby Theatre – As part of a management deal struck
between the University of Derby and Derby City Council, the local authority’s
entertainment arm Derby Live will also be responsible for the cultural
programming of the venue

ENGLAND – DERBY – DERBY THEATRE – see Derby
Playhouse

ENGLAND – DERBY –

GUILDHALL THEATRE

ENGLAND – DERBY – HIPPODROME THEATRE – Green
Lane – damaged in fire after months of standing empty – Jan/09 – Plans are being
laid to partially flatten the beleaguered Derby Hippodrome to make way for a
multi-storey car park, office and retail complex

ENGLAND – DEVON – EXETER THEATRE (FIRST
THEATRE ROYAL) – 1886-1887 burned to ground – 2nd THEATRE ROYAL – 1889 –
demolished in 1962

ENGLAND – DEVON – NORTHCOTT THEATRE – 1967 in
University of Exeter Grounds (433-580 seats)

ENGLAND – DOVER – Granada

ENGLAND – DUDLEY –
OPERA HOUSE

ENGLAND – DURHAM –

GALA THEATRE
– has unveiled a new performance space, 72 seat Blue Room used
as a cinema during the year, will be used as for performances for one week
during each season – can be used as a cabaret style venue or with raked seating;
Another space which will be used in future, Millennium Square, the open area
outside the theatre

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE – CINEWORLD – 6 screen
Cannon 1990 – then MGM 1991 – Virgin 1995 – became Cineworld 2005

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE –
CONGRESS THEATRE

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE – DEVONSHIRE PARK – 1884

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE – MUSIC PAVILLION – on
Pier with Pier Theatre

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE –
PIER THEATRE – 1907 –
burned down 1969 – on same pier as Music Pavillion

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE – ROYAL
HIPPODROME/THEATRE ROYAL – 1883

ENGLAND – EASTBOURNE – WINTER GARDENS – 1877 –
used various times from 1920s (when stage improved and enlarged) onwards

ENGLAND – EDMONTON – Empire – 1907

*ENGLAND –

ENGLISH THEATRE
– Frankfurt – founded 1979 – 1989 moved to new Art Deco
theatre

ENGLAND – ESHER –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – ESSEX – CLIFFTOWN THEATRE
(Southend-on-Sea City Centre) – and Clifftown Studios building due to open
January 29/10 with a mounting a three day theatre performance involving over 250
E15 actors, the entire technical department, ten theatre designers from
Wimbledon School of Art and Design and ten directors, led by Leon Rubin,
Director of East 15 – redundant church being put to good theatrical and
educational use – University of Essex, which includes East 15 Acting School, has
bought and completely refurbished and redesigned, the interior of a major church

ENGLAND – EXETER – NORTHCOTT THEATRE –
connected to University

ENGLAND – EXETER –

PHOENIX THEATRE

ENGLAND – EXETER – SEVEN STARS INN – just
outside city boundary – used as theatre circa 1735

ENGLAND – EXETER – THEATRE ROYAL – 1828 –
burnt down 1885 – new theatre 1886 – fire 1887 with the lost of 186 lives – 1889
new theatre opened – demolished 1962

ENGLAND – FARNHAM, SURREY – REDGRAVE THEATRE –
to be demolished 2006 – Redgrave family has joined forces with the people of a
small market town to save its repertory theatre from being razed to the ground
to make way for a leisure complex – plans for concrete complex comprising an
eight-screen cinema, shops, affordable housing and an underground parking
facility, which would displace the bowling green – theatre closed 1998 – past
three summers the New Farnham Repertory Actors Company (NFPAC) has performed in
a marquee outside the theatre to sell-out crowds

ENGLAND – FINSBURY PARK – ASTORIA THEATRE –
atmospheric

ENGLAND – FULHAM – CINEWORLD – 1930 opened as
Forum – became ABC 1961 – 1974 became triplex – 1975 4th screen added –
currently has 6 screens

ENGLAND – FULHAM – SHILLING THEATRE – see
Grand Theatre

ENGLAND – GATESHEAD – SAGE – classic music
scene has been transformed in past 20 years by number of symphony halls

ENGLAND – GLYNDEBOURNE – GLYNDEBOURNE FESTIVAL
OPERA – small country theatre 300 seats 1930s – new auditorium 1200 seats

ENGLAND – GORLESTON –

PAVILION THEATRE

ENGLAND – GREAT YARMOUTH – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – GREAT YARMOUTH –
WINTER GARDEN

ENGLAND – GREENWICH –

GREENWICH THEATRE
– to close after years as of April 2012

ENGLAND – GRIMSBY –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – HACKNEY –

HACKNEY EMPIRE THEATRE

ENGLAND – HALIFAX –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – HALIFAX – GRAND THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – HALIFAX –
PALACE THEATRE

ENGLAND – HALIFAX –
THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – HALIFAX –
VICTORIA THEATRE

ENGLAND – HAMPSTEAD -New End Theatre – closes end of August 2011 to make way for synagogue – built on New End Road 1890 as a mortuary of New End Hospital – converted to theatre in 1974 – Writers and performers associated with the venue over the years include Susannah York, Anthony Minghella, Stephen Fry, Steven Berkoff, Mike Leigh, Ken Russell, Judi Dench (a current patron), Jerry Hall, Helen Lederer and Joe McGann;

ENGLAND – HANLEY –
ABC CINEMAd

ENGLAND – HANLEY – GRAND THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – HARLOW – CINEWORLD – 6 screen Cannon
1991 – then MGM – 1995 Virgin in 1999 UGC – Cineworld in 2005

ENGLAND – HARROGATE –

HARROGATE THEATRE

ENGLAND – HARROGATE –
ROYAL HALL

ENGLAND – HARTLEPOOL – Town Hall Theatre
mainly features one-night stands and amateur groups, but it does have a small
professional theatre programme

ENGLAND – HASTINGS –
HASTINGS PIER

ENGLAND – HASTINGS –
WHITE ROCK THEATRE
opened 1927 – 1066 seats

ENGLAND – HAYES –
BECK THEATRE

ENGLAND – HEBDEN BRIDGE – PICTURE HOUSE –
Atmospheric style

ENGLAND – HENLEY-ON-THAMES –

KENTON THEATRE

ENGLAND – HEREFORD –
ABC CINEMA – opened as
Ritz 1938 – with 1012 seats – renamed ABC 1961 – closed 1972 for twinning –
closed 1977 – reoped 1984 as Classic Cinema – became Cannon in 1987, then MGM –
and again ABC – Odeon took over 2000 (378 seats)

ENGLAND – HULL – GRAND THEATRE AND OPERA HOUSE
– other use

ENGLAND – HULL –
HULL TRUCK THEATRE – new
theatre will open on April 23/09 to coincide with Shakespeare’s birthday and St
George’s Day – £15 million venue features a 440-seat main auditorium and a
134-seat studio – construction began 2006

ENGLAND – HULL –

NEW THEATRE

ENGLAND – HULL – PALACE THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – ILFORD – EMPIRE – 1913

ENGLAND – IPSWICH – HIPPODROME – other uses

ENGLAND – ISLE OF MAN –

GAIETY THEATRE

ENGLAND – ISLINGTON – CARLTON ABC – opened as magnificent cinema 1930 – closed 1972 and became Mecca Bingo Hall – closed 2007

ENGLAND – KEIGHLY – QUEEN’S THEATRE AND OPERA
HOUSE – demolished

ENGLAND – KENT – KENT OPERA – founded 1969

ENGLAND – SEVENOAKS PLAYHOUSE – cinema and
theatre complex – people are keen to see the cinema, in particular, reopened and
want the venue to be known by its old name, The Stag – prepares to shut down as
of July 2008

ENGLAND – KESWICK –
ALHAMBRA CINEMA

ENGLAND – KESWICK –

THEATRE BY THE LAKE

ENGLAND – KINGSTON –
ANTHONY MINGHELLA DRAMA SCHOOL – opening
Nov 8/08 – newly refurbished space at University of Hull

ENGLAND – KINGSTON-UPON-THAMES –
THEATRE Sir Peter
Hall’s planned Elizabethan theatre, will open in the autumn of 2007 – housed in
a modern building – 1,100 capacity theatre follows the groundplan of its
Elizabethan predecessor where many of Shakespeare’s early plays were performed –
auditorium will comprise a thrust stage of the kind used in Shakespeare’s time,
as at the Globe, and three tiers of seats, plus a space for the grounlings –
main auditorium draws its inspiration from Elizabethan theatre with its intense
inter-action between the actor and the audience – building houses a variety of
spaces:main auditorium with an audience over 900;Studio theatre 200;Gallery – a
versatile space for performance and the visual arts – Uncle Vanya 2007

ENGLAND – KIRRIEMUIR –
BARRIE’S FIRST THEATRE

ENGLAND – LANCASTER –

GRAND THEATRE

ENGLAND – LEEDS –

CITY VARIETIES/CITY PALACE OF VARIETIES
– 1865 – began as room attached to
Swan Public House (713 seats)

ENGLAND – LEEDS –

CIVIC THEATRE

ENGLAND – LEEDS – EMPIRE PALACE – demolished

ENGLAND – LEEDS –

GRAND THEATRE
– 1878 – build as touring theatre – 1554 seats

ENGLAND – LEEDS – JOSEPH HOLSON’S AMPHITHEATRE
– burnt down 1876

ENGLAND – LEEDS – LEEDS PLAYHOUSE – 1970 – 750
seats

ENGLAND – LEEDS – THEATRE ROYAL – burnt down
1876

ENGLAND – LEEDS –

WEST YORKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE
– 2005 is the 15th year for this venue

ENGLAND – LEICESTER – ATHENA CINEMA -1930s –
Originally designed in 1936 as an Odeon Cinema, the venue represented one of the
largest, most extravagant buildings with one screen seating over 3000 guests. It
was then subdivided into 4 screens in the 60s and remained closed throughout
much of the 90s – now Athena Conference and Banqueting, offering venue for
banquets, weddings, concerts and social events to clients. The company, which is
located in Leicester’s cultural quarter, which was restored to its former
splendour, retaining many of the original art deco feautures in 2004

ENGLAND – LEICESTER – CURVE THEATRE – opening
Dec 4/08 with Simply Cinderella – replaces Haymarket Theatre – opposite 1930s
Athena Cinema – 2 auditoriums 750 seats and 330 seats

ENGLAND – LEICESTER – LEICESTER HAYMARKET –
founded 1973 – 2 theatres (750 and 120 seats) – 2003 to close at end of summer –
performances to resume in 2004 with theatre reopening fully in 2006 as part of
new performing arts centre

ENGLAND – LEICESTER – PALACE THEATRE OF
VARIETIES – demolished

ENGLAND – LEICESTER – PHOENIX ARTS CENTRE –
originally Phoenix Theatre – 1963 – 274 seats – opened with The Matchmaker –
name changed 1979

ENGLAND – LIANDUDNO –
HAPPY VALLEY OPEN AIR
THEATRE

ENGLAND – LICHFIELD – GARRICK THEATRE – David
Garrick transformed British theatre in the 18th century. In the actor’s hometown
of Lichfield, a new theatre launches September, 2003 in his name

ENGLAND – LINCOLN – THEATRE ROYAL – faces
closure in 6 months (Oct/08)

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – ALEXANDRA THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – CAVERN CLUB – most famous club in the world has been rebuilt – Beatles appeared here 1961-1963

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – DRURY LANE – 1750 –
became Theatre Royal 1771 – became storage depot

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – EMPIRE, GARSTON THEATRE – 1915

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –
EMPIRE THEATRE – OLD AND NEW
– 1866 – opened as New Prince of Wales and Alexandra year later (2312 seats)

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – EVERYMAN
THEATRE/PLAYHOUSE – originally chapel – 1834 – opened 1964 – 430 seats

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – FORUM CINEMA –
Atmospheric style – closed – restoring

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – GARSTON THEATRE –
1915

*ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –
LIVERPOOL
PLAYHOUSE
– opened 1911 as Liverpoor Repertory Theatre – present name in
1916 – Playhouse 762 seats – Playhouse Upstairs seats 120

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – NEPTUNE THEATRE – 1913

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – OLD ROPERY THEATRE

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –
OLYMPIA THEATRE – 1905 – other
use

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – PHILHARMONIC HALL – 1849

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – PLAYHOUSE THEATRE –
1866

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – ROYAL COUNT THEATRE – 1938

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –
ST. GEORGE’S HALL

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – SCIENCE FICTION THEATRE
OF LIVERPOOL – see Everyman Theatre

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –SHAKESPEARE THEATRE –
Jack and the Beanstalk 1908

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL – STAR THEATRE – 1866 –
1916 became Liverpool Playhouse

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –
THEATRE ROYAL, BRECK ROAD – 1888

ENGLAND – LIVERPOOL –

UNITY THEATRE

ENGLAND – LONDON –
LONDON THEATRES

ENGLAND – LONGTON – EMPIRE THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – MAIDSTONE –
HAZLITT
THEATRE

ENGLAND – MALVERN FESTIVAL – founded 1929 –
lst English production of The Apple Cart (Cedric Hardwicke,Edith Evans) – more
than 20 of Shaw’s plays were presented there – Geneva, and In Good King
Charles’s Golden Days – lst production 1938 and 1939 respectively, as well as
Too True to be Good 1932 and Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles 1935

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – ALHAMBRA – 1908

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
ARDWICK EMPIRE THEATRE-
demolished

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – BRIDGEWATER HALL –
classic music scene has been transformed in past 20 years by number of symphony
halls

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – CAPITOL – 1931

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –

CARLING APOLLO

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – GAIETY THEATRE –
delapidated music hall taken over in 1907 and remodelled cutting 2500 seats in
half – Miss Horniman’s Repertory Co – first to be established in England –
reopened 1908 – closed 1917 – reopened 1921 became a cinema – demolished – see
Manchester School also

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – GRAND – 1883

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –

GREEN ROOM THEATRE

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
HIPPODROME THEATRE
demolished

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – HULME HIPPODROME – 1901

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – HULME PLAYHOUSE – 1902

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – HYDE’S THEATRE ROYAL –
opened in 1902 – 1200-seats – added a cinema screen in 1914 – 1974 saw its last
live theatre production, after which the main auditorium became a large cinema
and the stage area was converted into a second 220-seat cinema – closed
completely in 1992, and has since been passed from one owner to another without
anything being done with it – to reopen 2008

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –

LIBRARY THEATRE
– 1933-1934 – in basement of Public Library – was adapted as
lecture hall (308 seats)

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – Library Theatre Company
– see Theatre Royal

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
LOWRY, SALFORD

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA – 1966 – house the 69 Theatre Company – now the Royal
Exchange Theatre Company – resident Contact Theatre Company (250-350 seats)

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – MARSDEN THEATRE – first
permanent theatre – 1758 – closed and demolished 1869

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – ODEON (PARAMOUNT) – 1930

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
OPERA HOUSE – ST. HELIET – 1900
– opened as the New Theatre in 1912

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
PALACE THEATRE – 1891 – cost to
transform the Palace Theatre into the northern outpost for the Royal Opera House
would be about £100 million, and would require £16 million annually for running
costs – "Royal Opera House Manchester would be a substantial local employer,
creating over 500 full-time equivalent jobs, providing a unique hub for the
development of creative skills and training across all arts venues in the city
region

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – QUEEN’S – 1870

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – Regal Twins-1930 – 2 –
800 seat auditoriums

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – RNCH BRONTWOOD THEATRE – 1973

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
ROYAL
EXCHANGE THEATRE
– in 1968 the 69 Theatre Company took over the univerisity
theatre – in 1972 it leased the Royal Exchange formerly used for cotton trading
– and its theatre erected 1973 – new theatre opened 1976 – 700 seats

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER –
ST. JAMES’S THEATRE

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER SCHOOL – small group of
regional playwrights who flourished at Gaiety Theatre in Manchester from 1908
but did not survive World War I

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – SIXTY-NINE THEATRE
COMPANY – see Royal Exchange Theatre

ENGLAND – MANCHESTER – THEATRE ROYAL – 1775 –
burnt down 1789 – reopened 1790 – 1807 replaced by much larger theatre –
destroyed by fire 1844 – last Theatre Royal built in Peter Street 1845 – became
cinema in 1919 and now used for bingo – not used as actual theatre for 88 years
– proposed move is part of an £155m scheme to transform Manchester’s Town Hall
Complex, a 5 year project – including Central Library and the Town Hall
extension, to house the Library Theatre Company (established 1952) – oldest
theatre in Manchester

ENGLAND – MANSFIELD – PALACE THEATRE – getting
new seats and new carpets to replace furniture that has become worn – theatre
was originally refurbished in 1997 which boosted audience numbers and means some
seats and carpets have worn quicker than expected

ENGLAND – MARGATE –
CLIFF THEATRE

ENGLAND – MARGATE –
WINTER GARDENS

ENGLAND – MERMAID –

NEPTUNE THEATRE

ENGLAND – MILTON KEYNES –
MILTON KEYNES
THEATRE

ENGLAND – MORECAMBE – ROYALTY THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – MORECAMBE – VICTORIA PAVILLION – see
Winter Garden

ENGLAND – MORECAMBE –
WINTER GARDEN – (now
Victoria Pavillion) – opened 1897 – closed 1977 – now legacy secures this
historic theatre 2007

ENGLAND – NEATH – Gwyn Hall – 120 year old
hall destroyed by fire Oct 2007 – to be restored

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE – TYNESIDE THEATRE AND
OPERA HOUSE – one of the last remaining working Victorian Theatres to continue
operating

ENGLAND – NEWBURY –
WATERMILL
THEATRE
– 216 seats – also known as the West Berkshire Playhouse – running
for 23 years, converted from an old watermill – venue up for sale – home of
Edward Hall’s all-male Propeller Theatre Company – Backed by a loan of £750,000
from the Boris Karloff Foundation, and over 2,600 donors assisted in raising
funds – renovations and improvements will commence in April 2007

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE – NEWCASTLE OPERA HOUSE –
closed June/04 – opened 1867 – Sarah Bernhardt appeared here 3 times – first in
1895 – 1919 became a cinema, the Stoll, until 1974 – reopened 1977 as venue for
amateur musicals – closed again 1985 when fire broke out – restored and reopened
– hopes of a new management company taking over

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – COUNTY HOUSE
OF NORTHUMBERLAND – became centre for dramatic activity until about 1747 and
replaced by Turk’s Head Long Room

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – EMPIRE PALACE
THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – NEWCASTLE
PLAYHOUSE – first theatre called Robson for Flora Robson – theatre demolished –
replaced 1970 by University Theatre (450 seats) 1978 name changed – also houses
Gulbenkian Studio (120-200 seats) – Tyneside’s newest theatre – Northern Stage
is on the site of the old Playhouse Theatre, next to Newcastle University – new
auditorium with three stages – Son of Man 2006; formerly Newcastle Playhouse

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – OLYMPIA
THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – PAVILION
THEATRE – demolished

ENGLAND – NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE –
THEATRE ROYAL – Mosely
Street – 1788 – demolished 1830s to make way for Grey Street – new Theatre Royal
built and still stands – opened 1837 – enlarged 1895 – damaged by fire 1899 –
rebuilt – reopened 1901 – 1400 seats

ENGLAND – NORTHCOTT –

NORTHCOTT THEATRE

ENGLAND – NORTHHAMPTOM THEATRE – ABC – 1936

ENGLAND – NORTHHAMPTOM –

NORTHHAMPTON THEATRE

ENGLAND – NORTHHAMPTON – ROYAL THEATRE – 1884

ENGLAND – NORTH SOMERSET –
Weston-Super-Mare’s Grand Pier Pier
opened 1867 – 1904 theatre opened -has been destroyed by a huge fire, which took
hold of the historic entertainment venue in the early hours of this morning – It
marks the second time the pier has been ravaged by fire, having previously burnt
down in 1930. Prior, it had boasted the 2,000-seat Pavilion Theatre – recently
it had been used for a fun fair (1933,) bowling alley a go-kart track – 2004
celebrated 100th Anniversary celebrations

ENGLAND – NORWICH –
MADDERMARKET THEATRE
replica of Elizabethan theatre interior – built inside dilapidated hall 1921 to
house Norwich Players, amateur company founded 1911 – altered and enlarged 1953
and 1966 and now seats 300

ENGLAND – NORWICH –

THEATRE ROYAL
– 1768 – burned down 1934 – reopened 1935 – cinema for a time
– 1274 seats

ENGLAND – NORWICH – WHITE SWAN – last used
1771 – demolished 1961

ENGLAND – NOTTINGHAM – EMPIRE PALACE THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – NOTTINGHAM –
NOTTINGHAM PLAYHOUSE
1948 – was originally converted cinema seating 467 – new playhouse opened 1963

ENGLAND – NOTTINGHAM –
ROYAL CENTRE

ENGLAND – NOTTINGHAM – THEATRE ROYAL – 1760 –
rebuilt 1770s – new theatre built 1865 – old Theatre Royal converted to a
Music-Hall – a restaurant 1883 and beer warehouse 1901 – bombed 1941 and
eventually demolished; 2nd Theatre Royal – seated 1100 – built alongside Theatre
Royal – 1897 to 1958 – demolished 1969

ENGLAND – NOTTINGHILL – PRINT ROOM – see Coronet – Print Room began its journey five years ago in a derelict printing workshop on Hereford Road

ENGLAND – NUNEATON –
ABC SUPERPLEX

ENGLAND – OXFORD –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – OXFORD – APOLLO THEATRE – formerly
New, opened 1934 – being reverted to New Theatre September, 2003

ENGLAND – OXFORD – HEADLONG THEATRE – see
Oxford Stage Co

ENGLAND – OXFORD – NEW THEATRE – 1908 – see Apollo
Theatre

ENGLAND – OXFORD – OLD FIRE STATION – Putting
It Together 1992

ENGLAND – OXFORD –

OXFORD PLAYHOUSE
– Beaumont Street – replaced Red Barn Theatre and formerly
Big Game Museum – 1938 present playhouse built seating 700

ENGLAND – OXFORD STAGE COMPANY (OSC) – name
being changed 2006 to Headlong Theatre

ENGLAND – OXFORD – OXFORD UNIVERSITY DRAMATIC
SOCIETY (OUDS) – 1885 – Oxford Playhouse

ENGLAND – OXFORD – PLAYHOUSE – 1938

ENGLAND – OXFORD – PROSPECT THEATRE COMPANY –
founded as Prospect Productions in Oxford – 1961 – 1979 became Old Vic Company –
disbanded 1972

ENGLAND – OXFORD – OXFORD UNIVERSITY OPERA
CLUB – 1925

ENGLAND – OXFORD –
SHELDONIAN THEATRE

ENGLAND – PENZANCE – ACORN ARTS CENTRE – at risk of demolition

ENGLAND – PENZANCE –

ASSEMBLY ROOM

ENGLAND – PETERBOROUGH –
CRESSET THEATRE – closing summer 2011
after 32 years

ENGLAND – PETERBOROUGH –
BROADWAY THEATRE – opened
1937 as Odeon Cinema – renovated version opened 2001 – 1200 seats – street known
as Broadway has a long theatrical history – had two theatres as well as the
Odeon Cinema not two minutes apart. Before Sheltons in 1960, building next door
to the Odeon (now housing Gaston’s restaurant) was home to a Victorian venue
known as The Grand. Opened in 1878, it was affectionately dubbed the Little
Theatre and although subsequent name changes followed, including Theatre Royal
and latterly The Empire, it stood in the heart of Peterborough’s entertainment
centre for more than seven decades – Two months after Odeon opened, Embassy
theatre opened – Now a series of bars – converted into cinema and changed its
name to ABC – arson Jan 2009 – theatre will be closed for 4-6 months

ENGLAND – PITLOCHRY –
FESTIVAL THEATRE – OLD

ENGLAND – PLYMOUTH – GLOBE – 1788

ENGLAND – PLYMOUTH – PALACE – 1898

ENGLAND – PLYMOUTH –

THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – PORTHCUMO –

MINACK THEATRE
– built 1932 – 750 seats

ENGLAND – PORTSMOUTH –
EMPIRE PALACE

ENGLAND – PORTSMOUTH – HIPPODROME THEATRE –
opened 1907

ENGLAND – PORTSMOUTH – PRINCE’S THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – PORT TALBOT –
PLAZA THEATRE
currently closed, but with hopes of a restoration project, this cinema was
originally opened in 1939

ENGLAND – PRESTON – EMPRESS THEATRE –
Atmospheric style – closed & demolished

ENGLAND – PRESTON –
THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – PUDDLE DUCK, BLACKFRIARS – MERMAID
THEATRE – no hope that the Mermaid Theatre in Puddle Dock, Blackfriars, will be
saved. Although planning permission for the redevelopment of the site was given
in March, Mayor Ken Livingstone prevented its being put into immediate effect,
asking for clarification as to how the theatre will be replaced. Now the
agreement has been signed and £6m will be paid by the developers, Blackfriars
(PD) Ltd., to new or existing theatres in the area. The permission to redevelop
runs for five years, but the redevelopment is unlikely to begin soon as the
property development market is depressed

ENGLAND – QUINTON –
ABC CINEMA

ENGLAND – RAMSGATE –
ROYAL VICTORIA PAVILION

ENGLAND – READING –

HEXAGON THEATRE

ENGLAND – READING – ROYAL COUNTY THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – READING –
THEATRE

ENGLAND – RHYL –
PIER PAVILION

ENGLAND – RICHMOND –
GEORGIAN THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – RICHMOND – KING’S THEATRE – 1762 –
closed 1884

ENGLAND – RICHMOND – ODEON RICHMOND –
Atmospheric style

ENGLAND – RICHMOND – RICHMOND THEATRE – 875
seats – 1899 – also known as Richmond Hippodrome and Theatre

ENGLAND – RICHMOND, YORKSHIRE – one of three
oldest working theatres in England (others Briston and Bury Street,Edmunds) 400
seats – 1788 – 1811 became Theatre Royal – closed 1848 – restored and reopened
1963 with 238 seats – houses a theatre museum since 1979

ENGLAND – ROCHDALE – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – ROMSEY –
PLAZA THEATRE – Award-winning Art Deco
Theatre which was restored in 1982-84 – venue was originally built as cinema and
saw life as a Bingo Hall before being purchased and converted to the Plaza
Theatre

ENGLAND – ST. ALBANS –

ROMAN THEATRE OF VERULAMIUM
– built 140 A.D. – 2,000 seats

ENGLAND – ST. JUST, CORNWALL – PLEN-AN-GWARY –
medieval amphitheatre in St Just, Cornwall, said to be the oldest working
theatre in Britain and used by local drama groups, may have to close. An
adjacent plot of land and hut, used as the backstage area and changing room, is
to be sold by its owners, but the local groups cannot raise that amount. It is
one of only two remaining examples of a medieval ‘playing place’ left in
Cornwall. The other is St Piran’s Round, near Perranporth

ENGLAND – ST. PIRAN’S ROUND, PERRANPORTH –
PLEN, an amphitheatre, lies just off Bank Square and is the site at which, until
about AD 1600, Cornish ‘miracle’ plays were shown to the public – seats consist
of six steps with one on the top of all where the rampart;

ENGLAND – SALFORD – REGENT THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND, SALISBURY –

SALISBURY PLAYHOUSE

ENGLAND – SCARBOROUGH – ALEXANDRA MUSIC HALL – 1858

ENGLAND – SCARBOROUGH – CAPITOL THEATRE – 1929

ENGLAND – SCARBOROUGH –
OPEN AIR THEATRE
Northstead Manor Gardens – historic open air 7,000 seat amphitheatre built 1932,
but last used 1968 – now in disrepair for over 20 years, may reopen as part of
redevelopment project – Vagabond King 1950 – Entertainment impresario Paul
Gregg, takes over Europe’s largest working open-air venue – 6,500-seat historic
amphitheatre, which is due to undergo a multimillion pound redevelopment
programme after laying dormant for more than two decades – Scarborough Open Air
Theatre, which is scheduled to open in August 2010

ENGLAND – SCARBOROUGH – ROYAL OPERA HOUSE – 1877

ENGLAND, SCARBOROUGH –
STEPHEN JOSEPH
THEATRE IN THE ROUND
– 1936 – North Yorkshire – restored 1955 – 1970 moved to a school – 300
seats

ENGLAND – SCUNTHORPE –
PLOWRIGHT THEATRE

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – ABBEYDALE PICTURE HOUSE – 1920

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – ALBERT HALL – 1873

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – CRUCIBLE THEATRE – 1971
– replacing old Sheffield Playhouse – 1000 seats plus studio theatre with 250
seats – officially reopens tonight (17 February 2010) after a two-year, £15.3
million renovation (See News, 23 Sep 2009). National press and many of
Theatreland’s great and good are heading north for tonight’s opening of the epic
new production of Ibsen’s 1882 classic An Enemy of the People, which inaugurates
both the new building

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – EMPIRE THEATRE –
demolished

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – LIBRARY – 1930-1939

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – LYCEUM THEATRE –
1897

ENGLAND – SHEFFIELD – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – SHREWSBURY – THEATRE SEVERN –
Construction on Theatre Severn, in Frankwell Quay, Shrewsbury, will begin
October 2006 – will include a 650-seat auditorium, 250-seat studio, a dance
studio, rehearsal space and a bar – to open 2008

ENGLAND – SHROPSHIRE – RUMOURS CLUB – Market
Approach, Wellington – House of Prayer church has taken four months to convert
to Life Centre – site has previously acted as the town hall, a theatre and a
cinema

ENGLAND – SLOUGH – EMPIRE CINEMAS – 10 screens
– opened as Maybox Movie Centre – then Gallery, then Virgin, UGC and finally
Cineworld

ENGLAND – SOHO –

SOHO THEATRE

ENGLAND, SOUTHAMPTON – CINEWORLD – late 1980s
– 5 screens

ENGLAND, SOUTHAMPTON –

GANTRY THEATRE

ENGLAND – SOUTHAMPTON –
GRAND THEATRE

ENGLAND – SOUTHHAMPTON – MAYFLOWER – 1928

ENGLAND – SOUTHPORT –
GARRICK THEATRE

ENGLAND – SOUTHPORT – OPERA HOUSE – demolished

ENGLAND – SOUTHPORT – WINTER GARDENS PAVILION

ENGLAND – SOUTHSEA – SOUTH PIER THEATRE

ENGLAND – SOUTH SHIELDS – EMPIRE PALACE
THEATRE – other use

ENGLAND – STANFORD ON SOAR –
STANFORD HALL THEATRE

ENGLAND – STOCKPORT –
PLAZA THEATRE Built 1932 as Cinema
and Theatre – PLAZA SUPER CINEMA – Atmospheric style

ENGLAND – STOCKPORT – THEATRE ROYAL –
demolished

ENGLAND – STOKE – REGENT THEATRE

ENGLAND – STOKE NEWINGTON –
VORTEX
– 139-141 Stoke Newington Church Street, London – which has been Pirate Jenny’s
safe harbour for almost a decade and played welcoming host to hundreds of the
finest performers of musical cabaret is finally to close its doors, hopefully to
open them once more at a new site in Dalston before the end of the year –
landlord intends to redevelop the site for residential use and isn’t renewing
the lease – closes April 6/04

ENGLAND – STOKE-ON-TRENT – VICTORIA THEATRE –
1962

ENGLAND – STONE, STAFFORDSHIRE – CROWN MEADOW
AMPHITHEATRE – 2007 – new permanent three-tier facility outdoor theatre – can
seat 150 people or up to 500 if it is used as standing only

ENGLAND – STRATFORD UPON AVON – COURTYARD
THEATRE – see Stratford Upon Avon theatres

ENGLAND – STRATFORD UPON AVON –
ROYAL SHAKESPEARE THEATRE –
NEW
– three-year, £100 million transformation – new 1,030-capacity
auditorium will be created within the existing 1932 riverside building, which
currently seats 1,400. Once redesigned, the distance from the furthest seat to
the stage will be reduced from the current 27 metres to 15 metres – Performances
began last summer in the temporary, 1000-seat Courtyard Theatre, a prototype
version of the new RST, which will be Stratford’s main house auditorium during
the construction period – brand new 1,000 seat thrust stage auditorium, 36 metre high Tower, new exhibition spaces, new places to eat and drink, including Rooftop Restaurant and Riverside Café and terrace, restored 1930s features and improved public areas including the new Weston Square – new 1,040-seat mainstage, replaces the 1930s cinema-style proscenium theater with a thrust stage that seats auds around it on three sides;

ENGLAND – STRATFORD UPON AVON –
SHAKESPEARE MEMORIAL THEATRE
– OLD
– fire

ENGLAND, STRATFORD UPON AVON –

STRATFORD UPON AVON THEATRES
– plans for $185 million development of their
Stratford-Upon-Avon home – During construction, productions will be staged at
Courtyard Theatre, which opens in July/06 with a production of Shakespeare’s
Henry VI trilogy – Building set to start spring 2007 and will include
restoration of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre’s art deco features – Royal
Shakespeare and Swan theatres are scheduled to reopen in 2010

ENGLAND, STRATFORD UPON AVON – SWAN THEATRE –
Two Gentlemen of Verona 1991 – Productions in The Swan Theatre – reopening Nov 2010 – brand new 1,000 seat thrust stage auditorium, 36 metre high Tower, new exhibition spaces, restored 1930s features and improved public areas including the new Weston Square – RSC’s courtyard-style theater, has also been extensively refurbished. Further new spaces include the Rooftop Restaurant, with double height ceiling and views over the River Avon; and Riverside Cafe and terrace; an exhibition space; a 118-foot viewing tower; and a riverside walkway

ENGLAND, STRATFORD UPON AVON – THEATRE ROYAL –
home to the Theatre Workshop formed in 1945 with Joan Littlewood as the director
– after years of touring in 1953 this derelict theatre was transformed but the
company finally broke up in 1974 after producing such hits as A Taste of Honey,
The Quare Fellow, Sparrows Can’t Sing; Fings Ain’t Wot They Used T’Be 1959; Make
Me an Offer 1959; Oh What a Lovely War 1963; Five Guys Named Moe 1990

ENGLAND, STRATFORD EAST – opened with
Richelieu 1884

ENGLAND – STREATHAM – ASTORIA THEATRE –
atmospheric

ENGLAND – STREET –
STRODE THEATRE

ENGLAND, SURREY –

HARLEQUIN THEATRE

ENGLAND, SUTTON (Surrey) – Secombe Theatre
(named after Harry) – initially transformed from Christian Science Church
building – Council to close the theatre January 31, 2003

ENGLAND – SWINDON –
THEATRE

ENGLAND – SWINDON –
WYVERN THEATRE

ENGLAND – TENTERDEN, KENT – Sinden Theatre –
named after Donald – Homewood School – houses the school’s productions,
productions from local amateur groups, and visiting professional productions

ENGLAND –
THEATRE
THROUGHOUT ENGLAND

*ENGLAND –

THEATRES U.K.- ENTS THEATRE DIRECTORY

ENGLAND – TOOTING – GRANADA THEATRE –
atmospheric

ENGLAND – TORQUAY –
PAVILION

ENGLAND – TUNBRIDGE WELLS –
OPERA HOUSE

ENGLAND – TYNESIDE – NORTHERN STAGE OR
NEWCASTLE PLAYHOUSE – Tyneside’s newest theatre – Northern Stage is on the site
of the old Playhouse Theatre, next to Newcastle University – new auditorium with
three stages – Son of Man 2006; formerly Newcastle Playhouse

ENGLAND – WAKEFIELD –

THEATRE ROYAL

ENGLAND – WALSALL –
HER MAJESTY’S THEATRE

ENGLAND – WATERLOO – LIVERPOOL –
PLAZA THEATRE – Cinema

ENGLAND – WATFORD –
COLOSSEUM THEATRE

ENGLAND – WATFORD –

PALACE THEATRE
– 1908 – became repertory theatre – 1932 – 667 seats – After
more than two years of closure, with numerous delays while undergoing
refurbishment, Watford Palace will reopen this October/04

ENGLAND – WESTON-SUPER-MARE –
GRAND PIER PAVILION

ENGLAND – WESTON-SUPER-MARE –
WINTER GARDENS PAVILION

ENGLAND – WEST YORKSHIRE –

WEST YORKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE

ENGLAND – WEYMOUTH –
PAVILION

ENGLAND – WIMBLEDON –

NEW WIMBLEDON THEATRE
– see Wimbledon Theatre

ENGLAND – WIMBLEDON – NEW WIMBLEDON STUDIO

ENGLAND – WIMBLEDON –

WIMBLEDON THEATRE
– changed to New Wimbledon – reopening February 2004

ENGLAND – WINDSOR –
FIRESTATION – formerly
Windsor Arts Centre – to reopen as Firestation Sept 1/08

ENGLAND – WINDSOR – THEATRE ROYAL – Peascod
Street (1778-1793); 2nd Theatre Royal – High Street – 1793 – became Chapel 1805
– but 1815 new theatre opened on site – destroyed by fire 1908 – rebuilt 1910 –
656 seats – turned into cinema but became theatre again in 1938 – Jane Eyre 1961

ENGLAND – WOKING – NEW VICTORIA THEATRE

ENGLAND – WOKING – RHODA MCGAW THEATRE

ENGLAND – WOKING – AMBASSADORS CINEMAS

ENGLAND – WOLVERHAMPTON –
GRAND
THEATRE

ENGLAND – WOOLWICH – GRANADA THEATRE –
atmospheric

ENGLAND – WORKINGTON –
PLAZA THEATRE
Multi-screen Cinema

ENGLAND – WORKINGTON – WORKINGTON OPERA HOUSE – at risk of demolition

ENGLAND – WORTHING –
PAVILION THEATRE

ENGLAND – WORTHING –
PLAZA THEATRE Venue
mentioned as a former home of a Compton Organ built 1933

ENGLAND – YORK – GRAND OPERA HOUSE – later
Empire – New Clifford Street

ENGLAND – YORK –

THEATRE ROYAL
– 1769 – redecorated 1967 – 930 seats – runs Young People’s
Theatre Company

ENGLAND – YORK – YORK THEATRE – remodelled
1822

ERITREA – ASMARA –
THEATRE – Also known as
"Opera House".

ESTONIA – PARNU –
ENDLA TEATER (OLD AND NEW)

ESTONIA – PARNU –
ENDLA TEATER (OLD AND NEW)

ESTONIA – TALLINN –
BALTIMERE LAEVASTIKU TEATER

ESTONIA – PARNU –
ENDLA TEATER (OLD AND NEW)

ESTONIA – TALLINN –
BALTIMERE LAEVASTIKU TEATER

ESTONIA – TALLINN –
EESTI DRAAMATEATER
Built in 1910 as "Deutsches Theater" – Home to the local German theatre company
-1939 bought by the "Eesti Draamateater" (Estonian Drama Theatre) company – 1955
and 1960 minor exterior rebuilding – 1980 major interior restoration to the
original style – Main Hall: 548 seats, Small Hall: 145 seats

ESTONIA – TALLINN –
RAHVUSOOPER ESTONIA
Built 1913 as a complex of a theatre and a concert hall – Destroyed by bombs
1944 – 1947 rebuilt – From 1997 major exterior and interior renovations –
Concert Hall is home to the Estonian Symphony Orchestra – Theatre Hall: 695
seats, Concert Hall: 700 seats

ESTONIA – TARTU –
TEATER VANEMUINE (OLD AND
NEW)
– Built 1906 – Destroyed by acts of war in 1944; New Theatre Built 1968
as successor to the Teater Vanemuine (built 1906, destroyed 1944)

ESTONIA – VALGA–
TEATER SADE – Built 1911

ESTONIA – VILJANDI –
UGALA TEATER – Great
Hall: 497 seats. Small Hall: 160 seats

*EUROPEAN
THEATRE

*EUROPEAN
THEATRE CONVENTION

*EUROPEAN
THEATRES

*EUROPE
FOR VISITORS

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

F

*FINLAND –

FINNISH THEATRE

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
ALEKSANTERIN TEATTERI
Built 1879 as "Aleksanterin teatteri"/"Alexandersteatern" – used for
performances in Russian – 1917 renamed "Suomen kansallisooppera"/ "Finlands
nationalopera"- 1917-1993 home to the Finnish National Opera company. After new
opera house was completed in Helsinki in 1993, renamed "Aleksanterin
teatteri"/"Alexandersteatern" – currently used for guest productions – 473 seats

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
FINLANDIA-TALO
"Finlandia Hall". Concert halls built 1967-1972; 1973-1975 addition of a
congress wing – complex includes several halls, conference rooms, rehearsal
hall, a 400-seat restaurant, and a café – Finlandia Hall: Used for symphonic and
pop concerts, congresses, and galas. Home to the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra
and the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. 1700 seats; Helsinki Hall: Used for
recitals and chamber concerts, conferences, exhibitions, and corporate events.
340 seats; Congress Halls A/B: Two halls that can be combined to form one big
hall. Used for congresses. Up to 900 seats; Terrace Hall: Used for meetings,
exhibitions and presentations. 300 seats

*FINLAND – HELSINKI – FINNISH NATIONAL THEATRE
COMPANY – 1872 – moved to new building in 1902 –

NATIONAL THEATRE

FINLAND – HELSINKI – HELSINKI CITY THEATRE
1968

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
KAUPUNGINTEATTERI
Municipal theatre, built 1967

FINLAND – HELSINKI – LILLA TEATERN 1955

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
SUOMEN KANSALLISOOPPERA
– Finish National Opera. Built 1993

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
SUOMEN KANSALLITEATTERI

FINLAND – HELSINKI –
SVENSKA TEATERN – 1st
theatre on the site built 1827 by Carl Ludwig Engel. Demolished; 2nd theatre
built 1860 – destroyed by a fire in 1863; Current theatre built 1866 – 1936
rebuilt – 1978 extension by a winter garden restaurant. Used for theatre
performances in Swedish

FINLAND – SAVONLINNA–
OLAVINLINNA (OOPPERAJUHLAT)
– Olavinlinna castle built in 1475. Used as a venue for the Savonlinna
Ooperajuhlat Opera Festival – 2217 seats

FINLAND – SAVONLINNA–
TAIDEKESKUS RETRETTI
KONSERTTISALI
– Concert hall built into a cavern, used as a venue for the
Savonlinna Ooperajuhlat Opera Festival

FRANCE – AGEN –
THEATRE DOCOURNEAU
Built 1907-1908 – 920 seats

FRANCE – AIX-EN-PROVENCE – SALLE D’OPERA –
built 1775 – summer fests since 1948

FRANCE – AIX-LES-BAINS –
THEATRE DU CASINO GRAND
CERCLE
– Built 1896-1905 – Also known as "Théâtre du Casino du palais de
Savoie" – 650 seats

FRANCE – AJACCIO –
THEATRE SAINT-GABRIEL
Built 1836. Destroyed by a fire in 1927

FRANCE – ALBI-
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built in the mid-19th century – 765 seats

FRANCE – ALES –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Closed in the 1960s

FRANCE – AMIENS-
THEATRE

FRANCE – ANGERS-
GRAND THEATRE – Built
1865-1871, replacing a former theatre (built 1763) – 1100 seats

FRANCE – ANGOULEME-
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1870 for the city of Angoulême – used for opera, operetta, drama, and
vaudeville performances. Numerous restorations and alterations. Since 1968, used
as a private theatre. From 1976, operated as a communal and state theatre (after
1978 named "Centre d’Action Culturelle") – From 1994, major rebuilding and
restoration. Currently used for drama, ballet and variety performances. Also
used for classical and pop concerts. 930 seats

FRANCE – ANNONAY-
THEATRE – Built 1870.
900 seats

FRANCE – ARLES –

SALLE DES CONCERTS
– Built 1826

FRANCE – ARRAS-
THEATRE – Built 1784 –
1852 façade rebuildings – 750 seats

FRANCE – AUTUN –

THEATRE
– Built 1882 – 580 seats

FRANCE – AVIGNON –
ANCIEN COMEDIE – Built
1732 – Demolished, with the façade remaining

FRANCE – AVIGNON – FESTIVAL – Richard II 1947

FRANCE – AVIGNON –
OPERA-THEATRE – Built
1846-1847 on the site of a former theatre (built 1825, destroyed by fire in
1846) – 1350 seats. Used for opera performances by the resident company, and for
performances by the summer theatre festival, "Festival d’Avignon"

FRANCE – BASTIA –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1874-1879 – Site of the process of the bandit Spada in 1935. Severely
destroyed by bombs in 1943. Rebuilt in the 1970s, re-opened 1980 – 1100 seats

FRANCE – BAYONNE –
THEATRE – Built ca.
1825. 800 seats

FRANCE – BEAUNE –
THEATRE – Built 1859.
Later converted to a cinema

FRANCE – BEAUVAIS-
THEATRE – destroyed

FRANCE – BELFORT –
THEATRE GRANIT – Built
1877-1878 as "Théâtre Municipal" for the city of Belfort – 1929-1932 major
exterior and interior rebuilding, leaving only the façade to the Faubourg de
Montbéliard and the rear façade. 1979-1983 major rebuilding – 900 seats

FRANCE – BERNAY –
THEATRE

FRANCE – BESANCON –
OPERA-THEATRE – Built
1778-1784 as "Théâtre" – 1836 restorations- 1857 restorations and interior
alterations – Destroyed by a fire 1958, leaving only the façade – rebuilt –
Re-opened 1958. 1994 major interior rebuilding, renamed "Opéra-Théâtre".
Re-opened 11 Jan 1995 with a concert. Used for opera performances. Originally
2000 seats, after 1958: 1100 seats

FRANCE – BETHUNE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – BEZIERS –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1844. 1100 seats

FRANCE – BEZIERS-
THEATRE DES VARIETES

FRANCE – BLOIS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – BORDEAUX –
GRAND THEATRE - Opened
1780 – Damaged during French Revolution, restored 1799. 1837 conversion of the
concert hall (700 seats) into a ball room, later a foyer. 1853 renovation. In
1871 used as French parliament during the siege of Paris, hence site of the
proclamation of the 3rd French Republic. 1915, 1919, 1938, 1977 renovations.
1990-1992 major renovation. Re-opened 1992. Originally 1158, today 1114 seats

FRANCE – BORDEAUX –
THEATRE FRANCAIS - Built
1799-1801 by Dufort. Later converted to a multi-screen cinema

FRANCE – BOULOGNE-SUR-MER –
GRAND MUNICIPAL - Built
ca. 1860

FRANCE – BOURG-EN-BRESSE –
Théâtre Municipal / Salle
des Fêtes "La Grenette"
- First theatre on the site built 1776. Destroyed by
a fire in 1895; Current theatre and community hall complex built ca. 1900.
Renovations in the 1960s. Originally 600 seats, currently 720 seats. 1999-2002
renovations. Re-opened Jan 2002

FRANCE – BREST –
THEATRE - Built 1767.
Destroyed

FRANCE – BRIGNOLES –
THEATRE

FRANCE – BRIVE-LA-GAILLARDE –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL -
Built ca. 1900. 550 seats

FRANCE – BUSSANG –
THEATRE DU PEUPLE

FRANCE – CAEN –
GRAND THEATRE - Built
1838 – 1000 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1944

FRANCE – CAEN – THEATRE DU GROS GAILLOU –
childrens’ theatre

FRANCE – CALAIS-
THEATRE - Built 1903 by
Malgras. Opened 1905. Ca. 1400 seats

FRANCE – CAP D’AIL – COTE D’AZUR –

AMPHITHEATRE JEAN COCTEAU
– built 1958 – built and decorated by Jean Cocteau
– Part of the "Centre Méditerranéen"

FRANCE – CARCASSONNE –

GRAND THEATRE
– Open-air theatre, built 1908-1909 as "Théâtre en plein air
de la Cité" within the medieval fortifictaions of the city of Carcassonne – 5000
seats. Since 1957, used for theatre and opera performances as well as concerts
by the annual summer "Festival de la Cité" -used for an annual festival of
medieval spectacles in August

FRANCE – CASTRES-
THEATRE DE LA VILLE -
Built 1900. Restored in the 1970s

FRANCE – CHALONE-EN-CHAMPAGNE-
THEATRE

FRANCE – CHAMBERY-
THEATRE C. DULLIN
Built 1820-1824 – 1864 destroyed by a fire, with only the portico surviving –
major rebuilding – Re-opened 1866. Later renamed – 1993 major restoration – 600
seats

FRANCE – CHARLEVILLE-MEZIERES-
THEATRE – Built 1839 by
Labarre. 1961 major interior rebuilding. 825 seats

FRANCE – CHARTRES-
THEATRE – Built 1861.
660 seats

FRANCE – CHATEAUROUX-
THEATRE

FRANCE – CHATEL-GUYON-
THEATRE

FRANCE – CHERBOURG-
THEATRE – Built 1882.
Later rebuildings

FRANCE – CHOLET-
THEATRE – Built 1885.
Destroyed by a fire in 1949. Rebuilt in 1967. 1974 interior alterations. 600
seats

FRANCE – CLERMONT-FERRAND-
THEATRE – Built ca. 1890
– 1000 seats

FRANCE – COLMAR-
THEATRE – Built 1840.
1903 renovation and modernization. 1904 stagehouse rebuilding. Ca. 700 seats.
Used for opera performances by the Opéra national du Rhin

FRANCE – COMMENTRY –
THEATRE

FRANCE – COMPIEGNE –
NOUVEAU THEATRE

FRANCE – COMPIEGNE –
THEATRE IMPERIAL – Built
from 1867 for emperor Napoleon III, on the former site of a Carmelite convent.
Construction stopped in 1870 due to the French-German war. 1990-1991 major
renovation. Home to the "Théâtre Français de la Musique" opera company. Used for
opera, drama and ballet performances, and for concerts

FRANCE – CREIL –
THEATRE

FRANCE – DIEPPE –
CASINO; SALLE DES FETES

FRANCE – DIEPPE –
THEATRE – Built ca. 1900

FRANCE – DIGNE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – DIJON –
GRAND THEATRE – Built
1821, replacing the Sainte-Chapelle du Palais des Ducs. 1974 restorations

FRANCE – DOLE –
THEATRE – Built 1843

FRANCE – DOUAI –
THEATRE – Built
1783-1785 by Denis. Opened 1783. 1810 purchased by the city of Douai. 1810
auditorium redecoration – 450 seats

FRANCE – DUNKERQUE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – ENGHIEN-LES-BAINS –
THEATRE – Built 1909.
Later rebuildings. 800 seats

FRANCE – EPERNAY –
THEATRE – Built
1898-1902 – 750 seats

FRANCE – ETAMPES –
THEATRE – Built 1852

FRANCE – ETRIGNY –

THEATRE GALL0-ROMAN DE CHAMPLIEU
– ancient Roman theatre built 2nd Century
A.D. – 3,000 seats

FRANCE – EVREUX –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1903. 600 seats

FRANCE – FLERS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – EVREUX –
THEATRE DU CHATEAU
Built 1854 in the "Louis XV." wing of the palace. Also known as "Théâtre
Napoléon III"

FRANCE – FOUNTAINEBLEAU –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built in the late 19th century

FRANCE – FOUGERES –
THEATRE – Built 1881

FRANCE – FREJUS –

ANCIENT ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE
– ancient Roman theatre built 1st Century A.D. –
10,000 seats

FRANCE – GERARDMER –
THEATRE POPULAIRE
Open-air folk theatre, built 1897

FRANCE – GISORS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – GRAY –
THEATRE

FRANCE – HAGUENAU –
THEATRE – Built in the
19th century. 560 seats

FRANCE – HAM –
THEATRE

FRANCE – LANDERNEAU –
THEATRE

FRANCE – LANGRES –
THEATRE – Installed in a
17th century chapel

FRANCE – LAON –
THEATRE

FRANCE – LE HAVRE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – LE MANS –
THEATRE – Built 1844.
1100 seats

FRANCE – LE PUY-EN-VELAY –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1886-1893 – 800 seats

FRANCE – LILLE –

LILLE OPERA HOUSE
– Built 1907-1923 as "Nouveau Théâtre" at the site of the
previous municipal theatre (built 1784-1787, destroyed by fire in 1903). Opened
while uncompleted by the German troups in World War I. Officially opened 1923 –
Ca. 2000-2002 interior renovation and rebuilding of the stagehouse. Ca. 1000
seats

FRANCE – LILLE –
THEATRE – surrounded by
ruins of war

FRANCE – LILLE –
THEATRE OLD – Built
1784-1787 – 1841 extension and new façade. Completely destroyed by a fire 1903;
1907-1914 a new theatre was built on the site

FRANCE – LILLE –

THEATRE SEBASTOPOL
– also known as "Nouveau Théâtre", "Salle de Spectacle",
"Théâtre provisoire" – Built 1903-1904 as an interim theatre (after the 1787
municipal theatre had been destroyed by a fire in 1903). Mainly used for
operetta and comedy performances. Ca. 2000 seats

FRANCE – LILLEBONNE –

ODEON AMPHITHEATRE
– Ancient Gallo-Roman theatre, built in the 2nd century
AD

FRANCE – LONS-LE-SAUNIER –

THEATRE
– Built ca. 1900. 700 seats

FRANCE – LUNEVILLE –

THEATRE MUNICIPAL
– Built 1908, on the site of a previous theatre (built in
the early 18th century, destroyed by a fire). 900 seats

FRANCE – LYON –
CELESTINS, THEATRE DE LYON
– First theatre building on the site built 1792 as "Théâtre des Varietés",
replacing the former Templars’ Covent, "Couvent des Célestins". Destroyed by
fire in 1871. 1873-1877 rebuilt – Re-opened 1 Aug 1877 as "Théâtre des
Célestins". Again destroyed by fire on 25/26 May 1880 – Current theatre built
1880-1881 as "Théâtre des Célestins" – Opened 21 Nov 1881. Major restoration
1988-1992. Originally 1250 seats, currently 857 seats. Used for drama
performances by the resident company

FRANCE – LYON – GRAND THEATRE – 1688 – torn
down – rebuilt 1831

FRANCE – LYON –
ODEON – Ancient Roman
concert building, originally roofed. Famous for the beautiful mosaics in the
orchestra section

FRANCE – LYON –
OPERA – Built 1831 as
"Grand Théâtre", on the site of a previous theatre (built 1756, demolished)
opened 1831 – Ca. 1840 rebuildings. 1985-1993 complete rebuilding within the
exterior walls, preserving only the foyer. Addition of a glass dome. Re-opened
1993. Also known as "Opéra Nouvel

FRANCE – LYON –

ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE
– ancient Roman theatre built 2nd Century A.D. – 11,000
seats – Currently used for classical and pop concerts during the summer

FRANCE – LYON – THEATRE DES JEUNES ANNEES –
childrens’ theatre

FRANCE – MAISONS-LAFFITTE –
THEATRE DE LA NATURE
Open-air park theatre

FRANCE – MAMERS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – MANTES-LA-JOLIE –
CINEMA-THEATRE

FRANCE – MARSEILLE –
EXPOSITION COLONIALE;
THEATRE ANNAMITE

FRANCE – MARSEILLE – GRAND THEATRE – opened
1787 – burned down 1919 – present theatre dates from 1924

FRANCE – MARSEILLE –
OPERA MUNICIPAL – Built
1787 (2000 seats). Destroyed by a fire 1919. 1919-1924 rebuilding in Art Nouveau
style, preserving only the façade and the portico. 2137 seats. Re-opened 1924.
1972 renovations. Today 1786 seats

FRANCE – MAUBEUGE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – MAYENNE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – MEAUX –
THEATRE-OPERA

FRANCE – METZ – THEATRE – Built ca. 1840

FRANCE – METZ –
THEATRE-OPERA – Built
1738-1751. Opened 1752. 1858 renovations. Ca. 1970 renovations. 1200 seats. Used
for opera and ballet performances by the resident companies, touring venue for
drama performances by touring companies

FRANCE – MONACO – OPERA DE MONTE CARLO

FRANCE – MONTARGIS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – MONTELIMAR –
PALACE THEATRE – Cinema
and theatre

FRANCE – MONTELIMAR –
THEATRE

FRANCE – MONTLUCON –
THEATRES-OLD AND NEW
new Opened 1914 – 880 seats

FRANCE – MONTPELLIER –
LE CORUM – Opera house
and congress centre, opened 1990 – complex includes reception and exhibition
areas, function rooms, three main halls: Salle Berlioz: Also known as "Opéra
Berlioz". Opened 1990. Used for opera and ballet performances, concerts, and
congresses. Up to 2010 seats. Home to the Orchestre National de Montpellier;
Salle Pasteur: Opened 1988. Used for various performances, concerts, and
congresses. 745 seats; Salle Einstein: Opened 1988. Used for conferences. 318
seats

FRANCE – MONTPELLIER-
OPERA-COMEDIE – Built
1888 as "Grand Théâtre", on the site of a previous theatre (built 1755 by
Mareschal). Ca. 1500 seats – building also contains a concert hall, "Salle
Molière" (400 seats)

FRANCE – MOULINS –
THEATRE – Built 1837 –
600 seats

FRANCE – MULHOUSE –
THEATRE – Built
1868-1869 – 800 seats. Used for opera and ballet performances by the "Opéra
national du Rhin"

FRANCE – NANCY –
SALLE VICTOR POIREL
Built 1887-1889 as a part of the "Ensemble Poirel" (also including an art
gallery). Opened December 1889 – 1500 seats

FRANCE – NANCY –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built in the 18th century as "Hôtel des Fermes". Converted to a theatre in 1905.
1310 seats. Used for opera performances by resident company

FRANCE – NANTES-
APOLLO

FRANCE – NANTES-
GRAND THEATRE GRASLIN
Built 1776-1788. Opened 1788. Destroyed by a fire in 1796, leaving only exterior
walls. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1813 – 1968 renovations – 900 seats

FRANCE – NANTES-
THEATRE DE LA RENAISSANCE

FRANCE – NANTES-
THEATRE DE LA NAUTRE

FRANCE – NEVERS –
THEATRE – Built ca. 1850

FRANCE – NICE – THEATRE DE L’OPERA

FRANCE – NICE –

GREAT THEATRE
– 1766 – new one built 1826 – destroyed by fire 1881

FRANCE – NICE –
OPERA – Built 1883-1885,
on the site of a previous theatre (built 1776 as "Opéra Italien", destroyed by a
fire in 1881) – 1961 renovations. Also known as "Théâtre municipal" – 1100 seats

FRANCE – NIMES –

ARENES – SITE OF ANCIENT ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE
– built 1st Century A.D. Ancient
Roman amphitheatre – Since 1813, mainly used for bullfighting events. Since 1854
also used for theatre performances and festivals

FRANCE – NIMES –
GRAND THEATRE – Built
1801. Demolished 1983 – 1984-1987 the musem and library "Carré d’Arts" was built
on the site

FRANCE – NOGENT SUR SEINE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – NOYON –
THEATRE

FRANCE – ORANGE –

THEATRE ANTIQUE
– 5,000 seats – Ancient Roman theatre, built in the late 1st
century BC. – Currently used by an annual summer festival, "Chorégies d’Orange"

FRANCE – ORANGE –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built ca. 1895. Later converted to a youth centre

FRANCE – ORLEANS –
ALHAMBRA

FRANCE – PARIS – APOLLO THEATRE – Paris –
Merry Widow 1909; Veuve Joyeyse 1909

FRANCE – PARIS – ATELIER

FRANCE – PARIS – BOULEVARD DU TEMPLE –
fairground which became centre of entertainment – had permanent theatres
Funambules, Ambigu, Gaite – demolished with rebuilding of Paris 1862

FRANCE – PARIS – BOULEVARD PLAYS (Theatre de
Boulevard) – 1880 to 1914 – term used to describe type of play found in the
commercial theatres in Paris – by the 1970s there were only about 20 left –
among them Theatre du Palais-Royal and Comedie des Champs-Elysees

FRANCE – PARIS – BRICKTOP’S – 1920s jazz club
– Mabel Mercer (until 1938)

FRANCE – PARIS –
CABARET BRUANT

FRANCE – PARIS –
CABARET DU CIEL/CABARET DE
L’ENFER

FRANCE – PARIS –
CABARET DU LAPIN AGILE

FRANCE – PARIS –
CABARET DU NEANT
Founded 1892

FRANCE – PARIS – CARTOUCHERIE DE VINCENNES –
see Theatre du Soleil

*FRANCE –
CASINO DE
PARIS
– 1914 – 16 Rue de Clichy – Charlie Chaplin 1917; Josephine Baker 1931
– NY musical Chicago – opens March 2004

 

FRANCE – PARIS –
CENTRE POMPIDOU

FRANCE – PARIS – CHATELET THEATRE – 1 Place du
Chatelet

FRANCE – PARIS –
CHAT NOIR – cabaret started her in 1881 at 84 Boulevard Rochechouast, Montmartre – near Lapin Agile , later moved to larger premises at 12 Rue Victor-Masse – patrons of the Chat Noir included Adolphe Willette, Caran d’Ache, André Gill, Emile Cohl, Paul Bilhaud, Sarah England, Paul Verlaine, Henri Rivière, Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Charles Cros, Jules Laforgue, Charles Moréas, Albert Samain, Louis Le Cardonnel, Coquelin Cadet, Emile Goudeau, Alphonse Allais, Maurice Rollinat, Maurice Donnay, Marie Krysinska, Jane Avril, Armand Masson, Aristide Bruant, Théodore Botrel, Paul Signac, Yvette Guilbert, August Strindberg, and George Auriol – closed 1897 –
Today Le Chat Noir has been transformed into a modern boutique hotel, with a few nods to its raucous past

FRANCE – PARIS –
CIGALE – 120, boulevard
de Rochechouart

FRANCE – PARIS – CITE DE LA MUSIQUE (Music
City) – 1200 seats – opened 1995

*FRANCE – PARIS – COMEDIE DES CHAMPS ELYSEES –
Avenue Montaigne as annex to concert hall of same name – Art 1994

FRANCE – PARIS –
COMEDIE FRANCAISE – 2
rue Richelieu – built 1680 – foremost theatre of France – 1689 moved to theatre
built for them in tennis court of Etoile – 1770 moved to Tuileries and in 1781
moved to new theatre on present site of Odeon – fire – Built as "Théâtre des
Variétés amusantes" – 1792 renamed "Théâtre de la République". 1798 restoration;
Re-opened 1799 as "Comédie-Française". 1860-1864 restorations, addition of a
staircase and public foyers. Destroyed by a fire 1900. Subsequently restored .
Renovations in 1935, 1974-1976, and 1994. Originally 2000 seats, today 896
seats. Also known as "Salle Richilieu"

FRANCE – PARIS -COMEDIE ITALIENNE – 1680 –
Hotel de Bourgogne – company expelled from France 1697 – returned in 1716 – 1783
opened new theatre on Boulevard des Italiens (Theatre Favart) – destroyed by
fire – 1801 became Opera-Comique – name given to present theatre built 1835

FRANCE – PARIS –
COMIQUE
OPERA

FRANCE – PARIS – CONSERVATOIRE DE PARIS – 1786
began as Ecole de Declamation – name changed in 1793 to present – Built
1986-1990 as a new home to the musical college, "Conservatoire de Paris". The
complex includes 78 class rooms, 70 rehearsal rooms, 7 orchestra rehearsal
stages, an electro-acoustic studio, and three concert halls: Salle d’art
lyrique: Used for opera and ballet performances. 374 seats; Salle d’orgue: Used
for organ concerts and chamber concerts. 250 seats; Espace Maurice Fleuret: Used
for experimental concerts and other projects. 190 seats

FRANCE – PARIS –
CONCERT
EUROPEEN
– Vaudeville theatre and concert hall

FRANCE – PARIS –

CONSERVATOIRE DE PARIS

FRANCE – PARIS – CRAZY HORSE SALOON – 12 ave
George V – opened 1951 – occupies 12 former wine cellars in the Haussmanian building

FRANCE – PARIS –

DISNEYLAND PARIS

FRANCE – PARIS –
EXPO 1900; THEATRE DES
VIEILLES HALLES
– Built 1900 as part of the "Vieux Paris" exhibition af the
"Exposition de Paris 1900

FRANCE – PARIS – FAIRGROUNDS THEATRES – no
counterpart in England – lasted longest for puppet shows i.e. Punch and Judy

FRANCE – PARIS – FAIRS – Saint-Germain early
Spring and Saint-Laurent late August and September – best known for farce
players graduated from these fairs – eventually replaced wooden booths with
permanent playhouses

*FRANCE – PARIS

FOLIES BERGERE
– 32 rue Richter – opened 1869 as café-spectacle with mixed
bill of light opera and pantomime – first major Parisian music-hall – Ella
Fitzgerald, Liza Minelli, Frank Sinatra, Elton John… They have all given
exceptional galas, following in the footsteps of French celebrities such as:
Mistinguette, Josephine Baker 1926, Maurice Chevalier, Jean Gabin, Edith Piaf or
Yves Montand, Cabaret 2006

FRANCE – PARIS – FOLIES-DRAMATIQUE – 1831 –
melodrama – 1934 success with Robert Macaire

FRANCE – PARIS – FUNAMBULES – 1816

FRANCE – PARIS – GAITE

FRANCE – PARIS –
GAUMONT PALACE – First
entertainment venues on the site: Hippodrome du Champ de Mars (destroyed 1889)
and Hippodrome de l’Alma (destroyed 1892); Built 1897-1899 as "Hippodrome" by
Cambon, Galeron, and Duray for a British and French private society. Opened 13
May 1900 with the "equestrian pantomime", "Vercingetorix". Used for large-scale
equestrian spectacles, historical reconstructions, opera and ballet
performances, and various sport events. Capacity: 8000 persons (5000 seats, 3000
on the promenades). 1903-1907 used as a circus, also known as "Cirque Bostock";
1911 conversion to a cinema. Re-opened as "Gaumont Palace" (3400 seats, then the
largest cinema in the world). Used as a cinema and variety and music hall
performances; Ca. 1930 major exterior and interior rebuilding (6000 seats).
Re-opened 1931. Demolished 1972 in favour of an office and hotel block

FRANCE – PARIS – GRAND DUC – 1920s jazz club

FRANCE – PARIS – GRAND REX – Atmospheric style

FRANCE – PARIS – HIPPODROME – 1910 – 5000
seats – changed to Paris Gaumont Palace – 3400 seats

FRANCE – PARIS – HOTEL DE BOURGOGNE – built
1548 – used for theatricals 1629

FRANCE – PARIS – HOT JAZZ CLUB – Josephine Baker;

FRANCE – PARIS – ILLUSTRE-THEATRE – 1644 –
tennis court theatre where Moliere first acted

FRANCE – PARIS – L’ABBAYE – St. Germain des
Pres – Gordon Heath 1949 – ran for nearly 30 years

FRANCE – PARIS – LAPIN AGILE – formerly Cabaret des Assassin – opened as tavern in 1860 – building dated back to 1795 – At the turn of the twentieth century, Lapin Agile was a favorite spot for struggling artists and writers, including Picasso, Modigliani, Apollinaire, and Utrill

FRANCE – PARIS – LIDO – 116 bis, ave des
Champs Elysees – famous nightspot

FRANCE – PARIS – MADAME ARTHURS – female
impersonators

FRANCE – PARIS –
MOULIN ROUGE – 32 rue
Richter, Montmartre – established 1889- made famous by the Cancan created by
Louise Weber – First used for balls and performances of the famous "French
Cancan", subsequently used for operetta performances, revues, and as a cinema.
Since 1955 used for "dinner-spectacles"

FRANCE – PARIS – MUSEE GUIMET – club where
Mata Hari became the toast of Paris in 1905

FRANCE – PARIS –
ODEON – THEATRE DE L’EUROPE
– 1 Place de l’Odeon – Built 1780-1782 as "Théâtre-Français" for the drama
company, "Les Comédiens ordinaires du Roi" (later known as "Comédie-Française").
Opened 1782 by Queen Marie-Antoinette. 1789 renamed "Théâtre de la Nation". 1794
auditorium transformed from the original box layout to an "egalitarian"
amphitheatrical layout. Re-opened 1794 as "Théâtre de l’égalité". 1794 renamed
"Théâtre du Peuple". 1796 renamed "Théâtre de l’Odéon". Destroyed by a fire
1799. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1808 as "Théâtre de Sa Majesté
l’Impératrice et Reine". 1814 declared a Royal theatre. Again destroyed by a
fire 1818. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1819 as "Théâtre de l’Odéon", also
known as "Second Théâtre-Français". Foyers used as a military hospital during
the siege of Paris in 1870. 1888 electrification. 1906 auditorium alterations
(reducing the capacity by 300 seats). Major renvations in the 1930s. 1941
renamed "Théâtre national de l’Odéon". From 1946, also known as "Salle
Luxembourg", from 1959 also known as "Théâtre de France". 1966-1967 extension by
the studio stage "Petit-Odéon". In the 1960s and 1970s, used for performances by
the "Théâtre des Nations" and other guest companies. 1971 declared a national
theatre. From 1978, again used as a second home to the "Comédie-Française" and
for guest performances. From 1983, also used by the "Théâtre de l’Europe"
company. 1990, renamed "Odéon – Théâtre de l’Europe" and declared independent.
Subsequently mainly used for original language performances of European drama.
1995 installation of the theatre library, "Bibliothèque Jean-Louis Barrault"

FRANCE – PARIS – OLYMPIA – Famous nightspot –
Edith Piaf – from 1955 to 1962; Miles Davis 1960; Judy Garland 1960; Jacques
Brel 1961; Beatles 1964; Charles Aznavour 1978; Chavela Vargas 1981; Nina Simone
1990; Gilbert Becaus 1996 to 1999; Diana Ross 2004

FRANCE – PARIS – OPERA – completed 1875 by
Garnier – (Monte Carlo Casino and Opera House also designed by Garnier) – began
as L’Academie d’Opera 1669 – became L’Academie Royale de Musique 1672 – From
1674 to 1763 was Palais Royal – fire 1763 – Opera moved to Salle des Machines,
then back to rebuilt theatre in Palais Royal 1770 – another fire 1781 and opera
moved to Boulevard St. Martin until 1792 – the Revolution occasioned some name
changes (Academie de Musique; Opera; Opera National; Theatre des Arts) – in 1822
opera moved to new theatre in Rue Peletier – burned down 1873 – replaced in 1875
by present building – Opéra: Chronology Opéra 1770-1781; Opéra (Palais Garnier);
Opéra Bastille

FRANCE – PARIS –
OPERA COMIQUE – see
Comedie-Italienne – 2nd opera house 1714 – 1762 amalgamated with Comedie
Italienne – own premises 1898 – as the 3rd "Salle Favart"on the site of two
former theatre buildlings of the same name (1st "Salle Favart": built 1783,
destroyed by a fire in 1838; 2nd "Salle Favart": built 1840, destroyed by a fire
1887). The three Salles Favart have been home to the "Opéra-Comique" company
from 1783 to 1801, from 1840 to 1887, and again since 1898 – 1500 seats

FRANCE – PARIS –

OPERA DE LA BASTILLE
– Place de la Bastille – Built 1985-1989 for the
Republic of France; Main auditorium: 2703 seats – the building also includes the
"Amphithéâtre" (700 seats), the "Studio" (237 seats), and the "Scène de
répétition – Salle Gounod" rehearsal stage – home to the "Opéra national de
Paris"

FRANCE – PARIS – OPERA GARNIER – Place de
l’Opera Built 1862-1875 as "Académie nationale de Musique – Théâtre de l’Opéra".
1964 new auditorium ceiling painting by Marc Chagall. 1969 restoration of
electrical facilities. 1978 addition of new ballet rehearsal rooms inside the
existing dome. Re-named "Théâtre National de l’Opéra de Paris" in 1978.
Restoration works since 1994. 2300 seats; Renamed "Palais Garnier" after the
opening of the Opéra Bastille in 1989. Still used for ballet and opera
performances by the "Opéra national de Paris"

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS DE CHAILLOT – on
exhibition site opposite Eiffel Tower – used by Theatre Natioanl Populaire
1920-1934 – demolished 1934 for International Exhibition in Paris 1937 – now
houses 2 theatres built into hillside – closed 1972

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS DES CONGRES –
Starmania 1979; Notre Dame de Paris 1998

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS DE SPORTS – Les
Miserables 1980; Les dix commandements 2000

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS DU TROCADERO –
Conference centre, concert hall and museum complex, built 1878 for the Paris
World Exposition 1878. Concert hall (i. e. the central part of the building)
demolished in 1937. Rebuilding of the remaining parts of the building by
Chaillot. Re-opened 1937 as "Palais Chaillot", containing several museums

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS GARNIER – Opera
National de Paris – 1875

FRANCE – PARIS – PALAIS ROYAL

FRANCE – PARIS – PARISIAN THEATRE – Acclaimed
theatre director Peter Brook is to hand over the reigns of the Parisian theatre
that he has been running for 30 years (2009)

FRANCE – PARIS –
PARIS
OPERA
– see Opera Garnier

 

FRANCE – PARIS – PETIT-BOURBON

FRANCE – PARIS – PHILHARMONIE DE PARIS – Parc
de la Villette – 2400 seats – opens 2012

FRANCE – PARIS –
SALLE DES CONCERTS DUFAYEL
– Concert hall, built as part of the "Grand Magasins Dufayel" department store

FRANCE – PARIS – SALLE DES MACHINES – 1660

FRANCE – PARIS – SALLE DU PETIT-BOURBON –
first Court Theatre of France at Palace of the Dukes of Bourbon – 1577 – opened
with Commedia Dell’Arte troup 1577

FRANCE – PARIS – STUDIO THEATRE OF PARIS –
Gordon Heath – English language company

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE ANTOINE – 1866 – Blvd
de Strasbourg as Theatre des Menus-Plaisirs – name changed several times until
present name in 1896

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE BOUFFES-PARISIENS –
originally Salle des Folies Marigny in Champs-Elysees – 1855 – opera moved to
Theatre Salle Choiseul – until 1868 – Theatre Bouffes-Parisiens reopened in 1871

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DES CHAMPS-ELYSEES

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE CHATELET – Little
Night Music (Greta Scacchi,Leslie Caron) – Feb 2010;

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE COMEDIA – Grease Oct
8/08

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE CHAILLOT

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE FRANCE – see Odeon

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE GRENELLE
Built 1829 in the town of Grenelle (later incorporated to Paris)

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE LA GAITE-LYRIQUE
– famous in mid 19th Century – situated on Boulevard du Temple since 1764 –
renamed 1795 – rebuilt 1805 – 1860s theatre rebuilt nearby, adjacent to
Boulevard Sebastopol, where it still stands as the Theatre de la Musique

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’AMBIGU – 1769 –
Boulevard du Temple – first used for marionette and children’s shows – burned
down 1822 and rebuilt on Boulevard Saint-Martin – original site became
Folies-Dramatiques – demolished 1971

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE LA NATION – see
Comedie-Francaise

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE LA
PORTE-SAINT-MARTIN – celebrated playhouse – 1782 to replace the Opera which had
burnt down – closed 1840 – burnt down 1870 – rebuilt – 1978 taken over for Ecole
de Mimodrame

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE LA RENAISSANCE
– 1826 as Salle Ventadour – renamed 1836 – closed 1841; 2nd Renaissance opened
1873 where Theatre de la Porte-Saint-Martin had burnt down two years prior

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE LA REPUBLIQUE –
see Comedie-Francaise

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’ATELIER – 1822
surburban playhouse Place Charles-Dullin between Montmartre and Pigalle – first
Theatre de Montmartre, then became Theatre des Eleves – 1914 became cinema –
1922 reverted to theatre

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’ATHENEE – 1893
opened as Comedie-Parisienne, then 1893 Athenee-Comique

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE LA VILLE
see Theatre des Nations –

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE LA VILLE – THEATRE
SARAH BERNHARHT –

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE L’EMPIRE
37, avenue Wagram

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’EST PARISIEN –
Paris playhouse in working class area – 1950 – 1963 moved into converted cinema

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’HOTEL D’ARGENT –
2nd licenced theatre building in Paris – 1598 – Rue de la Verrerie – still
operating early 1600s

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’HOTEL DE
BOURGOGNE – first theatre in Paris – 1548 – in ruins of palace of the Dukes of
Burgundy in rue Mauconseil – ran until 1783

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’OEUVRE – see
Lugne-Poe

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DE L’OLYMPIA
Music hall, built 1894 -1950 rebuilt. 2000 seats

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE L’ONCLE SEBASTIEN
– 1935-39 – childrens’ theatre

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE LUTECE – Rue de
Jussieu – Theatre of the Absurd – Genet’s Les Negres 1959

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DE PARIS – opened as
Nouveau Theatre 1891 – 1919 present name – Theatre Moderne upstairs created in
1958

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DES
FOLIES-DRAMATIQUES
– Boulevard du Temple – built on site of first Theatre de
L’Ambigu which was destroyed by fire 1822 – opened 1831 – later New
Folies-Dramatiques built on Rue de Bondy 1862; 2nd THEATRE DES FOLIES –
NOUVELLES – 1852 – 1854 became Folies-Nouvelles – 1859 became Theatre Dejazet

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DES FUNAMBULES –
Boulevard du Temple – 1816 – demolished 1862

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DES MATHURINS – Rue
des Mathurins – 1906

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DES NOUVEAUTES
name bourne by four successive playhouses – 1st – 1827 in Passage Feydeau –
caught fire in 1830 revolution; 2nd 1866 on Boulevard St. Martin – burnt down
same year; 3rd 1878 Boulevard des Italiens; present or 4th 1920 on Boulevard
Poissonniere

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DES VARIETES –
Boulevard du Temple – 1779 – name given to theatre built 1807

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DU CHATELET – Built
1860-1862 as "Théâtre Impérial du Châtelet" – Originally used for drama
performances. Since 1875, also home to the "Association des Concerts Colonne".
In the 1900s, used for operetta, variety and ballet performances, for concerts,
and as a cinema. Since 1906, used for regular opera seasons; Since 1909, also
used for ballet performances by Diaghilev’s "Ballets russes" dance company.
1928-1979 mainly used for operetta and musical performances. Since 1979,
operated by the city of Paris. 1979-1980 major restoration. 1980 renamed
"Théâtre Musical de Paris". Used for opera performances, concerts, and various
festivals. 1988-1989 interior remodelling for acoustical and visual enhancement.
1989 re-renamed "Théâtre du Châtelet". 1998-1999 stage modernization. Currently
mainly used for opera performances and concerts. Original capacity: 3000 people,
today: 2300 seats – West Side Story 2007; A Little Night Music (Kristin Scott
Thomas, Leslie Caron) 2009; Sunday in the Park With George – 2012/13 season;

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DU GYMNASE MARIE
BELL
– Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle – Built 1820 as "Théâtre du
Gymnase-Dramatique" by Rougevin and Guerchy, on the former site of a café.
Opened 23 Dec 1820 with a prologue and Molière’s "L’Amour médecin". 1823
installation of gas lighting. 1824 renamed "Théâtre de Madame". 1830 re-renamed
"Théatre du Gymnase-Dramatique". 1958 renamed "Théâtre du Gymnase Marie Bell" in
honour of the French actress and theatre director, Marie Bell (1900-1985). 783
seats

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU MARAIS – 1634 – in
converted tennis court in Rue Vieille-du-Temple – Le Cid 1637 – 1644 building
burnt down – abandoned after Comedie-Francais opened

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU PALAID-ROYAL –
originally small private playhouse – rebuilt – 600 seats – 1641 – 1670 rebuilt
and enlarged – 1673 became Academy of Music – burnt down 1763 – rebuilt and
destroyed by fire 1781 – several theatres built here, most known as Palais-Royal
– one opened as Varietes-Amusantes 1790 – later became the Comedie-Francaise

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU PALAIS DE CHAILLOT
– 1937

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU PALAIS ROYAL –
1641 – Mirame

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU SOLEIL – 1964 –
production 1967 in disused Cirque Medrano – 1972 used shed in abandoned
Cartoucherie de Vincennes, former army training ground

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE DU VAUDEVILLE
1792 in Rue de Chartres – closed 1838 – reopened 1840 on Place de la Bourse –
closed 1869 – moved to Chaussee d’Antin – 1927 became cinema –
Europeen-Vaudeville on same site as music-hall with no connections to former
theatre

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE DU VIEUX-COLOMBIER –
originally Athenee – built early 19th Century – 200 seats – 1926 became cinema –
1930 again a theatre – closed 1972

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE EDEN

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE EN ROND DE PARIS –
1954

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE GRAMONT – Irma La
Douce 1956

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE-ITALIEN – see
Comedie-Italienne

*FRANCE –

THEATRE LIBRE
– 1887 – (1200 seats) – occupied three different buildings –
opened with four one-act plays – Jacques Damour; Mademoiselle Pomme; Le
Sous-Prefet; and La Cocarde – closed 1896

FRANCE –

THEATRE LYRIQUE
– rebuilt 1874 – renamed Theatre des Nations – Opera Comique
was there 1887-98 while its theatre was being rebuilt – In 1862, a new "Théâtre
Lyrique" (today’s "Théâtre de la Ville") was opened at another site on place du
Châtelet

FRANCE – PARIS –

THEATRE MARIGNY
– 1850 in gardens of Champs-Elysees – became Theatre des
Champs-Elysees – demolished 1881 and panarama constructed – became music hall
1896 and its present name in 1901 – 1925 redecorated – became most elegant
playhouse in Paris – Napoleon 1984

FRANCE –
THEATRE
MOGADOR
– 25 rue de Mogador – 1,800-seats on the Right Bank. It will bring
Stage Holding’s holdings to 19 theatres: eight in Germany, two in The
Netherlands, three in Spain and a five-theatre complex Off-Broadway. Future
plans include buying another theatre in Italy and one in Russia, and building a
new theatre for musicals in Amsterdam – lavishly renovated – Lion King Oct 2007; Sister Act – Fall 2012;

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE MONTPARNASSE – see
Baty, Gaston

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE NATIONAL DE CHAILLOT
– 1,300 seats

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE NATIONAL DE L’ODEON –
2nd theatre of France next to Comedie-Francaise – 1795 – rebuilt 1816 – fire 2
years later – 1959 renamed Theatre de France – reverted to old name in 1971

FRANCE – PARIS – THEATRE NATIONAL POPULAIRE –
housed in Palais de Chaillot – 1800 seats – 1972 theatre closed

FRANCE – PARIS –
THEATRE VICTOR-HUGO

FRANCE – PARIS –
TROCADERO

FRANCE – PARIS – VIEUX-COLOMBIER – 1913

FRANCE – PEZENAS –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1804 by converting a 17th century chapel

FRANCE – PONT-L’EVEQUE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – QUIMPER –
THEATRE MAX JACOB
Built 1899-1904 as "Théâtre municipal", on a site bequested to the city of
Quimper. Later renamed – 254 seats. Currently used by the "Scène Nationale de
Quimper" company

FRANCE – REIMS –
GRAND THEATRE – Built
1873. Destroyed by bombs during World War I. Rebuilt 1930-1931 to new designs,
preserving only the original façade. Used for opera and ballet performances as
well as for concerts – 950 seats

FRANCE – REIMS –
OPERA – cinema

FRANCE – RENNES –
OPERA – Built 1832-1836
as "Théâtre" for the city of Rennes. Originally for opera, ballet and drama
performances and for concerts. Auditorium destroyed by a fire 1856 – restored –
1912 renovations. Since 1968, used for opera and ballet performances and for
concerts. Renamed "Opéra de Rennes". 1997 major restorations – 950 seats

FRANCE – ROANNE –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL (OLD AND
NEW)

FRANCE – ROCHEFORT-SUR-MER –
THEATRE

FRANCE – ROUEN – ACADEMIE DE MUSIQUE – 1688

FRANCE – ROUEN – GRAND THEATRE/THEATRE DES
ARTS – 1776 – after Revolution knows as Theatre des Arts – burned down 1876 –
rebuilt 1882 – destroyed WWII – rebuilt as Theatre des Arts

FRANCE – SAINT-AMAND-LES-EAUX –
THEATRE – Built 1905

FRANCE – SAINT-BRIEUC –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SAINT-DENIS –
SALLE DES FETES

FRANCE – SAINT-DIZIER –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SAINT-ETIENNE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SAINT-LO –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SAINT-LAURENT – THEATRE DE LA FOIRE
SAINT-LAURENT – 1721 and destroyed 1761

FRANCE – SAINT QUENTIN –
THEATRE – Built in 1844.
950 seats

FRANCE – SAINTE-MARIE-AUX-MINES –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SAUMUR –
THEATRE – Built
1864-1866, replacing a previous theatre (built 1757). Ca. 800 seats

FRANCE – SEMUR-EN-AUXOIS –
THEATRE – Built 1847.
Destroyed by a fire in 1901. 1901-1904 rebuilt in the style of the previous
theatre

FRANCE – SENLIS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – SENS –
THEATRE Built 1882

FRANCE – SETE –
THEATRE MOLIERE – Built
1896-1904 as "Grand Théâtre Municipal" for the city of Cette. Later renamed
"Théâtre Molière"

FRANCE – SOISSONS –
THEATRE

FRANCE – STRASBOURG –
LE MAILLON HAUTEPIERRE
Built 1978

FRANCE – STRASBOURG –
LE MAILLON WACKEN

FRANCE – STRASBOURG –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL – 1821
– destroyed 1870 – rebuilt 1870-72 – Destroyed by bombs on 10 September 1870.
1872-1873 reconstructed to Villot’s plans. Re-opened 4 September 1873 – 1888
extensions (new dressing rooms, library, costume stores) – 1374 seats; Used for
opera and ballet performances by the resident opera company, Opéra national du
Rhin. Also used for drama performances in Alsatian dialect by Théâtre Alsacien
de Strasbourg

FRANCE – STRASBOURG –
THEATRE NATIONAL – Built
1888-1892 as "Landesausschuss" (regional delegation). 1911-1918 used as
parliament of the Alsace-Lorraine region . From 1918, used by the local
conservatory. Parliament hall converted to a concert hall and renamed "Salle
Hector Berlioz". Concert hall destroyed by bombs on 25 September 1944. Rebuilt
from 1952 as "Ecole d’Art dramatique du Centre dramatique de l’Est". 1968
renamed "Théatre national de Strasbourg". 1995-1997 renovations. Re-opened 18
October 1997. The complex contains two halls: "Salle Bernard-Marie Koltès"
(450-600 seats) and "Salle Hubert Gignoux" (200 seats)

FRANCE – TARASCON-SUR-RHONE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – THIONVILLE –
THEATRE

FRANCE – TOUL –
THEATRE

FRANCE – TOULON –
THEATRE – Built 1862 –
2000 seats

FRANCE – TOULOUSE – ACADEMIE DE MUSIQUE – 1724

FRANCE – TOULOUSE–
GAUMONT WILSON

FRANCE – TOULOUSE –
HALLE AUX GRAINS – Built
1861 as a corn market hall. 1952 converted to a multi-purpose hall, "Palais de
Sport". Subsequently used for sport events, circus, popular concerts, variety,
and other events. Since 1974, used for classical concerts. 1988 interior
rebuilding and acoustical enhancement. 2000 renovations. Home to the Orchestre
National du Capitole de Toulouse. 3000 seats

FRANCE – TOULOUSE –
THEATRE DES VARIETES

FRANCE – TOULOUSE – –
THEATRE DU CAPITOLE
Built 1736-1737 as "Théâtre du Capitole", at the site of a previous building
used for theatre performances since the 16th century – 1750 installation of a
façade, combining various buildings to a single town hall/theatre complex. 1795
renamed "Théâtre de la République". Closed 1800. Re-opened 1808. 1818 completely
rebuilt within the existing exterior walls (1950 seats). Re-opened 1818 with
"Les Jeux de l’amour et du hasard" and "Le Souper de Madelon". 1819, 1820, 1822,
1830, 1833, 1835 various rebuildings. 1880 major interior rebuilding. Re-opened
1880. Destroyed by a fire on 10 Aug 1917. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1923.
Used for opera and ballet performances by the resident companies

FRANCE – TOULOUSE –
ZENITH – Used for
variety and musical performances, circus, popular concerts, and sport events.
1500-6900 seats, maximum capacity: over 9000 persons

FRANCE – TOURCOING –
THEATRE

FRANCE – TOURS –
THEATRE FRANCAIS

FRANCE – TOURS –
THEATRE MUNICIPAL
Built 1872. Destroyed by a fire, subsequently rebuilt. 1200 seats

FRANCE – TROYES –
THEATRE DE LA MADELEINE
– Built 1779. 1860 rebuilding. 1970 renovations and rebuilding. 500 seats.

FRANCE – VAISON-LA-ROMAINE –
<”http://www.andreas-praefcke.de/carthalia/list_ancient_theatres.html”>ANTIQUE
THEATRE – Ancient Roman theatre, built in the 1st century BC. Abandoned in the
4th century AD. Currently used by an annual summer ballet festival, "Vaison
Festival".

FRANCE – VALENCIENNES –
THEATRE – Built 1787.
Destroyed by bombs in World War II

FRANCE – VENDOME –
THEATRE

FRANCE – VERDUN –
THEATRE

FRANCE –

VERSAILLES
– no permanent theatre – temporary stages were erected indoors or
in gardens – 1768 theatre built in north wing- theatre restored 1952 – theatre
built 1777 on site near palace and remained in use until 1886

FRANCE – VERSAILLES – CHATEAU DE VERSAILLES –
An 18th century royal opera house in France’s Chateau de Versailles – built
essentially of wood, it was inaugurated in 1770 for the wedding of then-to-be
King Louis XVI – is to reopen Sept 21/09 – 652-seat opera house, closed in 2007
for renovations –

FRANCE – VERSAILLES – OPERA ROYAL – 1769 –
700+ seats

 

FRANCE – VERSAILLES – THEATRE – 1624 – Lully’s
operas were performed in the gardens here – Salle de l’Opera in North Wing 1768
– reopened 1952

FRANCE – VERSAILLES – THEATRE DE LA REINE

FRANCE – VERSAILLES –
THEATRE GABRIEL – Built
1769-1770 as "Opéra Royal" for King Louis XV, based on an existing 17th century
building – 712 seats (largest theatre in France at the time of the opening).
Closed during the French Revolution in 1789. 1837 revived by King
Louis-Philippe, re-decoration of auditorium. Subsequently used occasionally for
opera and drama performances. 1871 converted to a parliament hall by Edmond de
Joly. 1871-1876 used as parliament by the "Assemblée nationale". 1876-1879 used
as parliament by the "Senat". 1952-1957 major restoration to the original 1770
plans. Re-opened 1957. Used for special gala performances, performances of the
"Mai de Versailles" festival, and opera performances by the Centre de Musiqe
Baroque, Paris. 800 seats

FRANCE – VERSAILLES –
THEATRE MONTANSIER
Built 1777. 1976 renovations

FRANCE – VICHY –
CASINO: SALLE DES FETES

FRANCE – VICHY –
MUSIC-HALL ELYSEE-PALACE

FRANCE – VICHY –
OPERA

FRANCE – VICHY –
OPERA – Built 1898-1901,
in the course of a rebuilding of the spa complex. 1940-1944 home to the
Assemblée Nationale and the Senate, the parliaments of the French Vichy regime
collaborating with Nazi Germany. 1995 major restoration. Re-opened as "Palais
des Congrès Opéra". Used for congresses and opera performances

FRANCE – VIENNE –


FRANCE – VILLEFRANCHE-SUR-SAONE –

THEATRE MUNICIPAL

QUICK GUIDE –

A
;

B
;

C
;

D
;

E
;

F
;

G
;

G

GEORGIA – BATUMI –
LETNIJ TEATR

GEORGIA – GAGRA –
KINOTEATR GAGRA

GEORGIA – GAGRA –
KINOTEATR GAGRA

GEORGIA – TBILISI –
KONZERTNY SAL FILARMONII

GEORGIA – TBILISI –
TEATR OPERY IM. PALIASHVILI

GEORGIA – TBILISI –
TEATR IM. RUSTAVELI
Built 1880-1896 at the site of a previous theatre building (built 1851,
destroyed by a fire in the 1874) – 1973 damaged by a fire. Subsequently rebuilt
– 1060 seats. Used for opera and ballet performances. Two foyer halls, Red Hall
and Mirror Hall, are also used for chamber concerts and other events

GERMANY – AACHEN –
FREILICHTTHEATER

GERMANY – AACHEN –
STADTTHEATER – small but
significant provincial opera house built 1825 (1124 seats) – 1900-1901
alterations of auditorium (1014 seats) and exterior – Destroyed by a fire after
bombings 1943. 1948-1951 restoration (942 seats). Re-opened 1951. 1975
auditorium alterations (905 seats). 1995 renovations

GERMANY – AALEN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – AALEN –
THEATER IM ALTEN RATHAUS

GERMANY – ALSDORF –
CINETOWER

GERMANY – ALTENBRAK –
WALDBUHNE

GERMANY – ALTENBURG –
BACHSAAL

GERMANY – ALTENBURG –
LANDESTHEATER – Built
1869-1871 as "Herzogliches Hoftheater" – Extensions in 1882 and 1895. 1904 front
extension. 1920 renamed "Landestheater". Rebuilding in 1927, 1938, and
1946-1947. Renovation 1983-1984 and since 1993. Originally ca. 900 seats, ca.
1940: 950 seats (+ 150 standing), today: 535 seats; Used as one of the two main
venues of the "Theater Altenburg Gera" opera and drama companies (see also:
Gera: Stadttheater)

GERMANY – ANCIENT ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE –
Archaeologists in southern Germany have discovered the remains of an ancient
Roman amphitheatre, a highly unusual find for the region

GERMANY – ANNABERG-BUCHHOLZ –
E.-V.-WINTERSTEIN-THEATER
– Built 1891-1893 as "Stadttheater" – 1951-1952 and 1976-1981 renovations. 1981
renamed – 300 seats, studio stage with 99 seats

GERMANY – ARNSTADT –
THEATER IM SCHLOBGARTEN
– Built 1841-1842 as "Fürstliches Hoftheater", as a rebuilding of the ducal
horse racing hall. 1903 and 1925 renovations. 1919 renamed
"Schloßgartentheater". 1988-1995 major renovation. Re-opened 1995 as "Theater im
Schloßgarten". Ca. 500 seats

GERMANY – ASCHAFFENBURG –
STADTTHEATER – Built
1810-1811 as " Hoftheater” – Severely damaged by bombs in 1944 and 1945.
1959-1960 renovations. 1980-1981 renovations – 533 seats (+ 62 standing).
Currently used for guest performances

GERMANY – ASCHERSLEBEN –
BESTEHORNHAUS

GERMANY – ATTENDORN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – AUGSBURG –
FREILICHTBUHNE AM ROTEN TOR
– Open-air theatre, built 1929-1930 around the fortification tower "Rotes Tor" –
Since 1932 used for opera and musical theatre performances by the Stadttheater
Augsburg opera company. 2117 seats

GERMANY – AUGSBURG –
KLEINKUNSTBUHNE LAKANO

GERMANY – AUGSBURG –
KONGREBHALLE – Opened
1972. Used for symphonic concerts by the Philharmonisches Orchester Augsburg,
pop concerts, congresses, and other events. 1400 seats

GERMANY – AUGSBURG –
PARKTHEATER GOGGINGEN
Built 1885-1886 as "Kurhaustheater" – 1920 repair works. Used as a cinema after
rebuildings in the 1930s. From 1944 provisional home to the Augsburg
Stadttheater ensemble. From 1951 used as dancing hall and cinema. Damaged by a
fire in 1972. 1974-1981 repair and safety works. Renovated 1996. Currently used
for operetta, musical and cabaret performances, concerts and balls. Ca. 600
seats

GERMANY – AUGSBURG –
STADTTHEATER 1776 & 1877
– Built 1776 at the site of a former theatre building (built 1665). Closed 1877
after the opening of the new "Stadttheater" – Built 1876-1877 – 1926 minor
modernizations. 1400 seats; 1938-1939 major renovations. Re-opened 1939 –
Destroyed by bombs 1944; 1948 roof rebuilding. 1952-1956 rebuilding to modern
plans. Re-opened 1956 – 1989-1990 interior rebuilding, modernization of stage
technology. 950 seats

GERMANY – BAD AIBLING – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD BLANKENBURG/THUR. – STADTHALLE

GERMANY – BAD BRAMBACH – FESTHALLE

GERMANY –BAD BRUCKENAU – KURSAAL

GERMANY – BAD DUBEN – BURG-FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – BAD EILSEN – KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD ELSTER – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD ELSTER – KURTHEATER


GERMANY – BAD EMS –

KURSAAL
– "Kursaal" complex built 1711-1720 as a spa palace for the dukes of
Nassau-Oranien. Later various extensions and rebuildings; "Marmorsaal" (marble
hall): Built 1836-1839. Used for concerts, theatre performances, balls, and
other events. Until 1872, also used as a casino; "Kurtheater": Theatre, built
1913-1914; "Kleiner Konzertsaal": Concert hall, built 1913-194. Since 1987 used
as a casino

GERMANY – BAD FREIENWALDE –

KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD GANDERSHEIM – DOMFESTSPIELBUHNE

GERMANY – BAD HARZBURG – KUR-LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – BAD HERSFELD – STADTHALLE

GERMANY – BAD HERSFELD – STIFTSRUINE
(FESTSPIELE)

GERMANY – BAD KISSINGEN –

KURTHEATER
– Built 1904-1905 as "Königliches Theater" Ca. 1918 renamed
"Staatliches Kurtheater" – 538 seats

GERMANY – BAD KISSINGEN –

REGENTENBAU
– Built 1911-1913 for the Kingdom of Bavaria. The complex
includes the main concert hall, "Großer Saal" (1000 seats), two smaller halls,
"Grüner Saal", and "Weißer Saal". Used for concerts during the "Kissinger
Sommer" summer festival and throughout the year, and for congresses and balls

GERMANY – BAD KROZINGEN – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD LAUCHSTADT –

GOETHE-THEATER
– Built 1802 for the Sachsen-Weimar court. Used as a summer
home to the Weimar court theatre company until 1811. 1818 bought by the Kingdom
of Prussia and declared Royal Dramatic Theatre. Subsequently used as a summer
theatre. 1830 stabilisation works. 1907-1908 renovation. 1966-1968 exterior and
interior renovation. 550 seats. Currently used for a summer season of drama and
opera performances by companies from Halle and other touring companies, for a
winter concert season, and for performances by the annual "Händel-Festpiele
Halle" festival

GERMANY – BAD LAUCHSTADT – KURSAAL

GERMANY – BAD LIEBENSTEIN – KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD LIEBENZELL –

KURHAUS
– Used as a ballroom, for theatre performances by touring companies,
and for concerts

GERMANY – BAD MEINBERG – KURSAAL

GERMANY – BAD MUSKAU –

PARKBUHNE
– Open-air theatre located in Fürst Pückler’s landscape park in
Bad Muskau

GERMANY – BAD MUNSTER AM STEIN –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – BAD NAUHEIM – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD NEUENAHR-AHRWEILER – KURTHEATER
BAD NEUENAHR

GERMANY – BAD OEYNHAUSEN – KAISERPALAIS

GERMANY – BAD OEYNHAUSEN –

THEATER IM PARK
– Built 1913-1915 as "Kurtheater", replacing the old Kurhaus
destroyed by a fire in 1910. Opened 1915 – 1954 renovation. 1979-1980 extensions
and rebuilding of the foyers. Originally 330 seats (+ 26 weelchair seats), today
400 seats (+ 56 wheelchair seats)

GERMANY – BAD ORB – NEUE KONZERTHALLE

GERMANY – BAD PYRMONT – FURSTLICHES KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD PYRMONT – KONZERTHAUS

GERMANY – BAD REICHENHALL –

ALTES KURHAUS
– Built 1898-1899 as "Königliches Kurhaus" – complex comprises
various function rooms and three larger halls: Festsaal König Maximilian II.: Up
to 650 seats. Used for theatre performances, concerts, congresses and other
events; Saal König Ludwig I.: Up to 180 seats. Mainly used for concerts and
small congresses; Saal Prinzregent Luitpold: Up to 180 seats. Mainly used for
small congresses and exhibitions

GERMANY – BAD SALZSCHLIRF – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD SALZSCHLIRF – KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD SALZUFLEN – KONZERTHAUS

GERMANY – BAD SALZUFLEN – PARKTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD SALZUNGEN – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BAD SALZUNGEN – PARKTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD SCHANDAU –

NATIONALPARKHAUS
– Cinema, built 1953 as "Filmtheater". 400 seats. Closed in
1991. 2001 re-opened as "Nationalparkhaus" information centre – Damaged by flood
in 2003. Subsequently restored. Used for lectures and other events, and as an
art cinema. 98 seats

GERMANY – BAD SEGEBERG – FREILICHTBUHNE AM
KALKBERG/KARL-MAY-FESTSPIELE

GERMANY – BAD SOODEN-ALLENDORF – KURTHEATER

GERMANY – BAD TOLZ –

KONZERTHALLE

GERMANY – BAD TOLZ –

MARIONETTEN-THEATER

GERMANY – BAD WILDBAD –

KURSAAL
– Used for classical and popular concerts and various other events.
Since 1989, used for opera performances and concerts by the annual summer
festival, "Rossini in Wildbad". Also known as "Kurhaus"

GERMANY – BAD WILDBAD –

KURTHEATER
– Built 1864-1865 as a private theatre – 1873 nationalized. 1888
renamed "Königliches Kurtheater". 1897-1898 major interior rebuilding Ca. 1900
extension by a stage set warehouse. Closed 1963. Subsequently left to decay.
1977 declared a State Cultural Monument. 1981-1982 and 1993 various demolitions
due to safety reasons. 1999 bought by the citizens’ society "Förderverein
Kurtheater Wildbad e. V.". Since 1999, major restoration. 200 seats

GERMANY – BAD WIMPFEN – KURSAAL

GERMANY – BADEN-BADEN – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BADEN-BADEN – STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – BADENWEILER – KURHAUS

GERMANY – BALLENSTEDT –

SCHLOBTHEATER
– Built 1788 – Since 1838, regular seasons of drama and opera.
1845 restoration. 1987/1988 renovation. Ca. 350 seats – theatre was used as a
touring location, as Ballenstedt never had a resident theatre company. Currently
used for guest performances by the Nordharzer Städtebundtheater
Quedlinburg/Halberstadt and for various other events

GERMANY – BAMBERG –

E.T.A.-HOFFMAN-THEATER
– Built 1808 as a ballroom and theatre – 1862
auditorium rebuilding – Since 1937, operated by the city of Bamberg. 1953-1958
restoration to the 1862 designs. 1981 façade restorations. 2000-2003 major
restoration and extension by a foyer, modernization of stage technology.
Re-opened 2003 – Used for drama performances by the resident company.

GERMANY – BARSINGHAUSEN – FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – BAUTZEN –

STADTTHEATER
– Built 1795-1796, converting a former bastion. Later various
rebuildings. 1868-1871 major rebuilding (ca. 700 seats). 1905 rebuilding (ca.
655 seats). Since 1963, operated as "Deutsch-Sorbisches
Volkstheater/Nemsko-Serbske Ludowe Dziwadlo" and used for opera and drama
performances in German and Sorbian. Closed 1969 due to structural problems.
Demolished in 1969

GERMANY – BAYREUTH – FESTSPIELHAUS (Festival
Hall) – 1876 – Wagner Festival inaugurated here – seats 1,800 – 1881-1882
extension by the "Königsbau", a staircase pavilion with a closed royal box.
Renovated 1925-1925, 1931, 1933, 1958-1959 and 1962-1973. Originally 1645 seats,
today 1925 seats; Throughout its history, the theatre has only be used for
performances of Richard Wagner’s operas during the Festspiele (with the
exception of some performances of Beethoven’s 9th symphony, and some
entertainment performances after World War II).

GERMANY – BAYREUTH – MARKGRAFLICHES OPERNHAUS
– 1748 – Renovated 1820, 1935-1936 and 1977-1980. 490 seats (+ 16 standing).
Currently used as for opera performances during various festivals and for
various concerts

GERMANY – BAYREUTH –
RUINENTHEATER EREMITAGE
– built as a ruin – Open-air park theatre, built 1743-1744 – Later addition of a
roofed auditorium space with 230 seats. Since 1980, used for summer drama
performances by the Studiobühne Bayreuth company

GERMANY – BAYREUTH –

STADHALLE
– Built 1748 as a riding school. 1785 converted to a theatre.
Re-opened 1785 as "Hochfürstliches Theater" ny the "Medoxische Theatertruppe"
company. From 1792, used as a military barack. After 1918, used as a garage.
Since 1933, property of the city of Bayreuth; 1936 converted to a multi-purpose
hall. Re-opened 1936 as "Ludwig-Siebert-Halle" – Capacity: up to 3000 persons.
Mainly used for balls and Nazi events. Destroyed by bombs in 1945, with only the
façade remaining intact. 1948 temporarily rebuilt as a cinema and re-opened as
"Stadthallen-Kino"; 1958-1965 major rebuilding. Renamed "Stadthalle". Re-opened
1965 – Used for opera and drama performances, concerts, balls, and various
events

GERMANY – BERGEN AUF RUGEN – THINGSTATTE

GERMANY – BERLIN –
APOLLO THEATER – Built
1890 as "Concordia-Theater" – converted the "Flora" dancing hall into a theatre.
Later renamed "Apollo-Theater". Closed ca. 1910. 1925 converted to a cinema.
Destroyed by bombs in World War II

GERMANY – BERLIN – ADMIRALSPALAST – Producers
Spring 2009;

GERMANY – BERLIN –
ATLANTIS-KABARETT

GERMANY – BERLIN – BAYERISCHE STAATSOPER –
1818 – linked to Court Theatre (1753) by covered passage – now known as
Cuvillies Theatre – destroyed by fire 1823 – reconstructed 1825 – destroyed by
bombing 1943 – 1963 restored

GERMANY – BERLIN –
BELLE-ALLIANCE-THEATER
Built 1865-1969 by conversion of a restaurant and dancing hall into a theatre –
1000 seats. The theatre’s summer theatre garden was known as one of the most
beautiful in Berlin. Demolished in 1913

GERMANY – BERLIN – CINEMAS – CinemaxX
Colosseum; CineStar Sony-Center; Delphi-Filmpalast; Discovery Channel IMAX;
Gerard Philipe; Haus Wien; International; Kammerlichtspiele; Kosmos UFA-Palast;
Lunik; Phoebus-Palast; Tauentzien-Palast; Titania-Palast; Urania; Zoo-Palast

GERMANY – BERLIN –
BERLINER ENSEMBLE
Built 1891-1892 as "Neues Theater am Schiffbauerdamm". Opened 1892 – 1903-1906
directed by Max Reinhardt. 1912 renamed "Monti’s Operettentheater", 1916 renamed
"Neues Operettentheater". 1925 renamed "Theater am Schiffbauerdamm". 1931
renamed "Deutsches Nationaltheater am Schiffbauerdamm". Damaged by bombs in
1944. Subsequently rebuilding. 1954 re-opened as "Berliner Ensemble", co-founded
Bertolt Brecht. 1999-2000 renovations and alterations. Originally 810 seats (+
standing), ca. 1940: 781 seats, today: 678 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN – BERLINER FESTPIELE –

GERMANY – BERLIN – BERLIN PHILHARMONIC

GERMANY – BERLIN –
BERLINER THEATER
Built 1850 as "Zirkus Renz". 1852 rebuilt. Opened as "Neues Königstädtisches
Theater". 1854 renamed "Spezialitäten-Theater". 1869 rebuilt. Re-opened as
"Walhalla-Volks-Theater". 1881 renamed "Walhalla-Theater". 1883 renamed
"Walhalla-Operetten-Theater". 1888 major rebuilding. Re-opened 1888 as "Berliner
Theater". Since 1910, mainly used for operetta performances. 1933-1935 home to
the "Theater des Jüdischen Kulturbunds". Closed 1935 due to safety concerns.
Demolished 1935

GERMANY – BERLIN –
BUGGENHAGEN-THEATER
Also known as "Theatersaal Buggenhagen"

GERMANY – BERLIN – BUNTES ‘MOTLEY’ THEATRE – sometimes known as Uberbrettl – opened 1901 – Alexanderplatz – moved to 800 seat auditorium later

GERMANY – BERLIN –
CARROUSEL THEATER AN DER
PARKAUE

GERMANY – BERLIN –
CENTRAL-THEATER
Opened 1880. Mainly used for operetta and popular drama performances. Ca.
1942-1943 used as a cinema ("Atlas-Lichtspiele"). Destroyed in World War II

GERMANY – BERLIN – CHAMALEON – Two major
musical theatres of the 1920s that and "Wintergarten" as well as countless
cabarets provide entertainment of all possible descriptions

GERMANY – BERLIN –
CHAMALEON VARIETE
Built 1904 -1906 as a part of the "Hackesche Höfe" complex. Originally used as
one of two concert halls and ballrooms, known as "Neumannsche Festsäle". Later
renamed "Imperial" and used as cinema. Later used as rehearsal stage by the DFF
television network. Since the 1990s, renamed "Chamäeon" and used as a variety
theatre

GERMANY – BERLIN – CHAT NOIR – Friedrichstrasse

GERMANY – BERLIN – COMIC OPERA – 1920s East
German landmark

GERMANY – BERLIN – DEUTSCHE OPER –
Bismarckstrasse – First theatre on the site built 1911-1912 as "Deutsches
Opernhaus". 1924 renamed "Städtische Oper". Destroyed by bombs in 1943. From
1945, the "Städtische Oper" opera ensemble performed in the "Theater des
Westens" until the new "Deutsche Oper Berlin" was opened which was built
1957-1961, using the remains of the previous theatre. Opened 1961 – 1885 seats

*GERMANY – BERLIN –

DEUTSCHE OPER THEATER/KAMMERSPIELE
– 1883 – most prominent of Berlin
theatres – closed 1944 – reopened 1945 – 1946 became National Theatre of East
Berlin – housed Berliner Ensemble – reopened 1961

GERMANY – BERLIN – DEUTSCHE STAATSOPER UNTER
DEN LINDEN – originally founded as court opera 1741 – twice bombed during WWII –
renovated 1955 – originally called Hofoper – 1396 seats – 1919 became
Stadttsoper or State Opera

GERMANY – BERLIN – DEUTSCHES THEATER – Built
1840-1848 as "Friedrich-Wilhelmstädtisches Theater". Opened 1850 – 1872
rebuilding. 1883 renamed "Deutsches Theater". 1905-1920, directed by Max
Reinhardt – 1937 removal of the other boxes, installation of a government box.
Damages in World War II. Re-opened 1946. Renovations 1955 and 1963. 1980-1983
major restoration. Re-opened 1883 – 900 seats.

GERMANY – BERLIN – DIE KATACOMBE – infamous
cabaret of 1920s – closed down 1935

GERMANY – BERLIN – ELDORADO – infamous
transvestite/homosexual bar of 1920s – became Nazi headquarters in 1930s

GERMANY – BERLIN – FREIE BUHNE (FREE STAGE) –
1889- private theatre club – played in various theatres – moved to Deutsches
Theatre in 1894

GERMANY – BERLIN –
FRIEDRICHSTADTPALAST – OLD
AND NEW
– Built 1867 as a market hall. Closed after 6 months,
subsequently used as a warehouse. 1873 converted to a circus building (4500
seats). Re-opened 1873 as "Markthallen-Circus" . 1879 renamed "Zirkus Renz" –
renamed "Zirkus Schumann"for circus and variety performances. Closed in 1918;
1918 bought by Max Reinhardt’s National-Theater AG. 1918-1919 rebuilt, creating
a stage reminding of ancient theatres. Re-opened 1919 as "Großes
Schauspielhaus". Ca. 3000 seats. Subsequently used for drama performances, e. g.
Max Reinhardt’s productions. A second stage in the basement of the complex was
used by the cabaret "Schall und Rauch". After 1924, the complex was mainly used
for revue and variety performances – Marlene Dietrich; Tiller Girls (from
London); 1933 nationalized and renamed "Theater des Volkes". Subsequently
rebuilt, reinstalling a traditional proscenium stage. Used for operetta and
ideological drama performances. Destroyed by bombs in 1943; 1945 provisional
rebuilding. 1947 renamed "Friedrichstadtpalast" and re-opened as a variety
theatre (also known as "Palast Varieté"). Closed 1980 due to structural problems
caused by the stilt fundaments. Demolished in 1985; 1984, a new
"Friedrichstadtpalast" was opened at another site in Friedrichstraße – Revue
theatre, built 1984 as a successor to the the old "Friedrichstadtpalast" at
another site. Opened 1984 with a gala revue. 1895 seats. Used for large-scale
revues by the resident ensemble; complex also includes a basement cabaret stage:
Opened 1984 as "Kleine Revue". 2002 renamed "Quatsch Comedy Club". 240 seats –
on the brink of bankruptcy September 2008

GERMANY – BERLIN – FRIEDRICHSTRABE – glitz
and glamour turned Friedrichstraße into a throbbing and risqué entertainment
boulevard in the 1920s. At that time, the city had more than 400 variety
theatres or "speciality theatres" as they were also known

GERMANY – BERLIN –
GEBIRGSHALLEN

GERMANY – BERLIN – GERMANY SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

GERMANY – BERLIN – GORKY THEATER –
concentrates on receiving theater companies from Eastern Europe and Latin
America

GERMANY – BERLIN – GRIPSTHEATER –
childrens’ theatre

GERMANY – BERLIN – GROSSES SCHAUSPIELHAUS –
1919 – (later the Friedrich Stadt-Palast) – 3000 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
HANSA-THEATER – Built
1888 as a performance and assembly hall for the "Berliner Kronenbrauerei"
brewery (424 seats + 1364 standing). 1889 renamed "Stadttheater Moabit". Used
for popular farces, operetta and contemporary drama performances. 1923 converted
to a cinema, renamed "Filmpalast Hansa" (800 seats). 1963 re-converted to a
theatre proper. Renamed "Schauspielhaus Hansa". 1974 renamed "Hansa-Theater".
1989 renamed "Berlins Volkstheater Hansa". Closed 2002 for financial reasons.
Re-opened 2002 as "Hansa-Theater" – 500 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
HAUS DER BERLINER FESTSPIELE
– Built 1961-1963 as "Freie Volksbühne" for the West-Berlin "Freie Volksbühne e.
V." society. 1047 seats. Opened 1963. Site of the yearly held "Berliner
Theatertreffen" theatre festival. Closed 1992 due to a lack of public funding.
In summer 2000, renamed "Haus der Berliner Festspiele" (also known as "Berliner
Festspielhaus"). Subsequently used as a home to the "Berliner Festspiele"
theatre and music festivals

GERMANY – BERLIN –
HAUS DER KULTUREN DER WELT
– Built 1956-1957 as "Kongreßhalle", as the U. S. American contribution to the
international architecture exhibition, "Interbau 1957". The complex included a
convention centre, function rooms, and a theatre hall. Opened 1957 – roof
construction collapsed 1980, killing one person. 1982-1986 rebuilding. 1988
renamed "Haus der Kulturen der Welt" [House of the Cultures of the World]. Since
then, used as meeting place for exhibitions, conferences, lectures, concerts,
films, and theatre performances

GERMANY – BERLIN – HEBBELTHEATRE – Built
1906-1908 as ""Hebbel-Theater" – 1911 renamed "Theater in der Königgrätzer
Straße". 1930 renamed "Theater in der Stresemannstraße". 1934 renamed "Theater
in der Saarlandstraße". During World War II, operated as part of the Nazi
Volksbühnenverbund. Minor damages in World War II, subsequently repaired. 1945
re-renamed "Hebbel-Theater". Re-opened 1945. 1946-1947 rebuilding with various
alterations. 1960 interior alterations. 1972 bought by the city of Berlin.
Closed in the early 1980s. 1987-1988 renovation to the original designs.
Re-opened 1988. Subsequently mainly used by local and international companies.
Since 2003, operated as "HAU 1" by the "Hebbel am Ufer" theatre company. Ca. 800
seats

*GERMANY, BERLIN –

HEKTICKET
– BERLIN – HALF PRICE TICKETS

GERMANY – HOFOPER (Lindenoper) – opened 1742
and later became home of Staats Oper

GERMANY – BERLIN – KABARETT DER KOMIKER, OR
KADE KO – infamous cabaret of 1920s

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KAMMERSALE

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KAMMERSPIELE – Built
1906 for the theatre director Max Reinhardt, by converting a casino and ballroom
(built 1850). Opened 1906. 1937 auditorium alterations – Damaged in World War
II. Re-opened 1946. 1955 and 1963 restorations. 1980-1983 major restoration. 300
seats. Used for drama performances by the "Deutsches Theater" state drama
company

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KLIEMS FESTSALE

GERMANY – BERLIN – –
KOMISCHE OPER
Behrenstrasse – first theatre on the site was built in 1764 as the first private
theatre in Berlin. Closed 1786. Built 1891-1892 as "Theater Unter den Linden"
"Unter den Linden". Opened 1892. Used mainly as an operetta theatre. Stalls: 800
seats; ca. 1700 seats. Closed 1896 after the directors went bankrupt; 1898 minor
interior renovations. Re-opened 1898 as "Metropol-Theater". Subsequently used as
a variety theatre. Closed 1933; 1934 nationalized and renamed "Staatliches
Operettentheater" – operated as part of Nazi "Kraft durch Freude" programme.
Stagehouse damaged by bombs 7 May 1944. Façade, entrance hall, and auditorium
ceiling painting destroyed by bombs on 9 Mar 1945; Feb 1946 – Dec 1947 –
Re-opened 1947 as "Komische Oper". Various alterations and extensions throughout
the 1950s. 1965-1966 rebuilding of the exterior. Re-opened 1966 – 1270 seats;
Since 1947, home to the resident "Komische Oper" opera company, spezializing on
German-language productions of opera, operetta and musicals. 1966-2004 also home
to a resident ballet company (first as "Tanztheater der Komischen Oper", from
1999 as "BerlinBallett – Komische Oper"); The theatre is not identical to the
"Theater unter den Linden" that operated 1933-1945 in the former "Kleines
Theater" at Unter den Linden 44. Furthermore, today’s "Komische Oper" has no
connection to the "Komische Oper" (an der Weidendammer Brücke) that operated
from 1905 into the 1920s as an opera theater, later as an operetta theatre, and
finally as a revue theatre;

GERMANY – BERLIN – KOMISCHE OPER A. D.
WEIDENDAMMER BRUCKE – Built 1905 as an opera theatre. From 1911, used mainly for
operetta performances. From 1921, used as a revue theatre. Ca. 1150 seats;
Today’s "Komische Oper" has no connection to this theatre and is located at
another site in Behrenstraße

GERMANY – BERLIN – KOMODIENHAUS – in
Gendamenmarkt – became Konigliches National Theatre in 1786; Built 1908 as
"Neues Operetten-Theater". Opened 1908. Later renamed "Komödienhaus". 1000
seats. Destroyed by bombs in November 1943

GERMANY – BERLIN – KONIGSTADT – theatre built
1824

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KONZERTHAUS CLOU
Built 1883-1886 as municipal market hall, "Markthalle III". 1910-1912 converted
to a concert hall and restaurant. Re-opened 1912 as "Konzerthaus Clou". On 1 May
1927, the hall was the venue of Adolf Hitler’s first speech to a mass audience
in Berlin. Closed as an entertainment venue in 1943. From 1943, the hall was
used as "Lager IV", one of four Berlin "Sammellager" camps where thousands of
Jewish slave workers were detained before they were deported to extermination
camps in Eastern Europe. Destroyed by bombs in World War II – After World War
II, a factory building was built on the site. Currently the site is used by
several art galleries

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KONZERTSAAL HOCHSCHULE FUR
MUSIK – OLD AND NEW
– Concert hall, built 1958 for the Berlin
Conservatory, "Hochschule für Musik". 1360 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
KROLL-OPER – Built
1843-1844 as the entertainment venue "Krollscher Wintergarten" (also known as
"Etablissment Kroll"). The complex included three large halls ("Königsaal"
a.o.), a large veranda, a basement hall, and 14 function rooms. Total capacity:
5000 guests. Used as a restaurant, for balls, and for concerts by a resident
orchestra; 1850 addition of a garden theatre. Opened 1850 as "Sommertheater in
Kroll’s Garten". Garden theatre demolished in 1856; Since September 1850, the
Königsaal was also used as a theatre for opera and drama performances. Main
building destroyed by a fire on 1 Feb 1851 – rebuilt, to the original exterior
plans and altered interior plans. Re-opened 1852. 1855 renovations and
extensions by several greenhouses. During the 19th century, the complex was used
by various owners and directors for opera, operetta, drama, and variety
performances as well as for concerts. 1600 seats; 1895. 1895 re-opened as "Neues
Königliches Operntheater", operated by the Prussian state opera and drama
companies. Used as a warehouse in World War I; 1922-1923 major interior
rebuilding. Re-opened 1924 as "Staatsoper am Platz der Republik" (also known as
"Kroll-Oper") by the Volksbühne society, used exlusively for performances of the
Staatsoper company. 2100 seats; Since 1927, used by a resident opera ensemble.
1927 extensions. Re-opened 19 Nov 1927 – theatre became famous for an avantgarde
approach to opera direction, stage sets by modern painters, and the staging of
many avantgarde operas by contemporary composers. Closed 1931; After the
Reichstag fire in 1933, the Kroll-Oper became the seat of the German parliament.
On 23 March 1933, site of the infamous Ermächtigungsgesetz decision of the
Reichstag that ceded nearly all legal power to Adolf Hitler. Subsequently used
for staged sittings of the Reichstag (after 1938: Großdeutscher Reichstag), a
parliament without any real political power. Site of Hitler’s speech announcing
the beginning of World War II on 1 Sep 1939. Destroyed by bombs on 22 Nov 1943.
Remains demolished on 27 Mar 1951

GERMANY – BERLIN –
LESSING-THEATER
Built 1887-1888 replacing a the circus building "Zirkus Krembser". Originally
1100 seats (+ 60 standing), later 1033 seats. Destroyed by bombs in April 1945

GERMANY – BERLIN –
MAXIM-GORKI-THEATER
Built 1825-1827 as "Haus der Singakademie für Musik- und Kulturgeschichte". Used
as concert hall by the Singakademie choral concerts and for scholarly lectures.
1848 rebuilt, subsequently used for conventions of the Nationalversammlung.
Destroyed by bombs 1943; 1947 rebuilding of the exterior and conversion to a
drama theatre (including the addition of a fly tower). Subsequently operated as
a theatre by the neighbouring "Haus der Kultur der Sowjetunion". 1952 renamed
"Maxim-Gorki-Theater". Re-opened 1952. Since then used as a drama theatre by the
resident company. 441 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
METROPOL-THEATER
Built 1911 as "Admiralspalast" , replacing the Admiralsgartenbad spa (built
1873-1874) – complex included cafés, a cinema, a bowling centre, a luxury spa,
and an ice rink at Planckstraße (accessible via a courtyard from
Friedrichstraße). 1922 conversion of the ice rink into a variety theatre,
"Weltvarieté" (1065 seats); 1930 rebuilding (2200 seats). Re-opened as "Theater
im Admiralspalast". 1939-1940 major redecoration which destroyed expressionist
decoration (as ordered by the Nazi culture ministery) (1400 seats). 1945-1955
used as home to the Deutsche Staatsoper opera company. 1946 venue of the merger
between the forced merger of the East-German social democratic (SPD) and
communist (KPD) parties to the SED; 1955 renamed "Metropol-Theater". 1955-1983
used mainly as a concert hall. From 1983, used as an operetta theatre. In the
1990s, re-opened as a private musical and revue theatre. Closed 1997 – left to
decay – cinema wing (at Friedrichstraße) was later used as a casino. Currently
it is used by the cabaret company, "Die Distel"; theatre is not identical to the
variety theatre, "Metropol-Theater" (1898-1933) in Behrenstraße, currently home
to the "Komische Oper"

GERMANY – BERLIN – MINGOTTI OPERA COMPANY –
touring company operating in 18th century

GERMANY – BERLIN –
MUSICALTHEATER
Built 1994-1998. The complex houses the "Stella Musical Theater" (1800 seats),
the casino "Spielbank Berlin", and the basement restaurant "Adagio". The space
under the large canopy in front of the entrance hall can be converted to a
stage, using the Marlene-Dietrich-Platz as an open-air auditorium

GERMANY – BERLIN – NATIONALTHEATER – 1787 –
new theatre opened 1802 – burnt down 1817 – rebuilt

GERMANY – BERLIN –
NATURTHEATER FRIEDRICHSHAGEN

GERMANY – BERLIN – NEOPATHISCHE CABARET –
Tilla Durieux

GERMANY – BERLIN – OPERA HOUSE – in East
Berlin, destroyed in World War II, was rebuilt in 1951; it is home to the
long-established Deutsche Staatsoper ( German National Opera)

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PALAST DER REPUBLIK
Built 1973-1976 on the former site of the Prussian Royal Palace, "Stadtschloß"
(demolished in 1950). Opened 1975. The complex contains a large hall, a
parliament hall, a theatre, a youth centre, a bowling centre, and several
restaurants, cafés, and bars; Großer Saal: Used for political conventions,
congresses, festivals, guest theatre performances, classical and pop concerts,
and balls – 5000 seats; Plenarsaal: Site of the GDR parliament, "Volkskammer der
DDR". Site of the the first freely elected parliament of the GDR in 1990. 536
seats (+ 250 balcony seats for spectators); Theater im Palast (TiP): Studio
theatre located in the 4th storey – 250 seats – closed in 1990 because of
asbestos contamination. After years of political and aesthetic discussion about
the future of the site, the German Bundestag parliament decided in favour of a
new building largely imitating the old Prussian Royal Palace in July 2002.
Currently the Palast der Republik is used for temporary exhibitions, but mainly
left to decay

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PASSAGE-THEATER
Opened ca. 1900 in the "Kaisergalerie" shopping and entertainment mall (built
1869-1973). Later used for performances of the "Linden-Cabaret" company. Later
used as a cinema. Destroyed by bombs in 1943. Finally demolished in 1957;
1985-1987, the "Grand Hotel" was built on the site (later renamed "The Westin
Grand Hotel")

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PHILHARMONIC OLD AND NEW
– Kreuzberg, Bernburger Str. 22a-23 (Philharmonie & Oberlichtsaal) / Köthener
Str. 32 (Beethovensaal) – Home to the Berliner Philharmoniker. Destroyed by
bombs in 1944; Großer Saal der Philharmonie: Built 1887-1888 by converting a
former roller skating rink. 1614 seats; Oberlichtsaal: Built 1898 by converting
a former garden courtyard; Beethovensaal: Built 1898 by Ludwig Heim. 1066 seats
– 1960-1963, a new "Philharmonie" building was built on another site Location:
Tiergarten, Herbert-von-Karajan-Straße 1 / Kemperplatz / Tiergartenstraße /
Matthäikirchplatz (Kulturforum) – First "Philharmonie" built 1888 by at another
site in Bernburger Straße. Destroyed by bombs in 1944 – Concert hall, built
1960-1963 as home to the Berliner Philharmoniker. 1975 installation of a
sinkable orchestra stage. 1978-1982 renovation and installation of exterior
aluminum decoration. Main auditorium: 2440 seats around a central stage;
1979-1984 extension by a musicologist institute ("Staatliches Institut für
Musikforschung", opened 1983) and a museum of musical instruments
("Musikinstrumenten-Museum", opened 1984); 1984-1987 extension by a second
concert hall, "Kammermusiksaal". Opened 1987. 1192 seats around a central stage

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PLAZA – Built 1867 as
train station "Küstriner Bahnhof", also known as "Ostbhanhof". Closed 1882.
Subsequently used as a warehouse, and partly converted to apartments – 1928-1929
converted to a variety theatre. Re-opened 1929 as "Plaza". Since 1938, operated
by the Nazi organization "Kraft durch Freude". 3000 seats. Closed in Sep 1944.
Destroyed war in 1945. Remains demolished in 1952 – 1969-1974 the headquarters
of the newspaper "Neues Deutschland" and a printing factory were built on the
site

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PRACHTSALE DES WESTENS

GERMANY – BERLIN –
PRATER-THEATER
Summer beer garden (since 1837), operated as an entertainment venue since 1863.
Ca. 5000 seats. 1905-1906 addition of a theatre building (also known as
"Bürgerliches Schauspielhaus", 600 seats). Since 1929, used as a cinema. Since
1967, used as a cultural centre. Currently used for drama performances by the
Volksbühne company

GERMANY – BERLIN –
REICHSHALLEN-THEATER

GERMANY – BERLIN –
RENAISSANCE-THEATER
Built 1901-1902 as "Vereinshaus Motiv". 1919 installation of a two-floor cinema.
1921 rebuilding. Re-opened 18 Oct 1922 as "Renaissance-Theater" – the only,
originally preserved building 1926-1927 rebuilding, conversion into a drama
theatre. Re-opened 1927. 1943 nationalized and renamed "Kleines Haus des
Schiller-Theaters". Damaged in World War II. 1946 repair works and rebuilding.
Re-opened 1946 as "Renaissance-Theater". 1985 restoration to the original
designs. 1995 restoration of foyers. 545 seats. Currently used as a private
theatre, mainly for contemporary drama and comedy performances

GERMANY – BERLIN –
RUHLEBEN CAMP THEATRE

GERMANY – BERLIN –
ROSE-THEATER
Friedrichshain, Karl-Marx-Allee 78 (formerly: Große Frankfurter Straße 132) /
Koppenstraße 32 – Built 1877 as "Ostend-Theater". 800 seats. The complex also
included a café, a restaurant, and a summer garden theatre. 1896 renamed
"Carl-Weiss-Theater". 1906 renamed "Bernhard-Rose-Theater". Later renamed
"Rose-Theater". Garden theatre destroyed by bombs 1943. Theatre converted to a
cinema in 1944. Re-opened as "Ufa im Rose-Theater" 1944 – Destroyed by war in
1945 – The currently operating "Ostendtheater" is located in another building in
Boxhagener Straße 99

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SCALA – Schöneberg,
Martin-Luther-Straße (formerly: Lutherstraße) – Variety theatre, opened 1920.
Damaged in World War II. In 1960, provisional home to the "Wühlmäuse" cabaret
company. Later demolished

GERMANY – BERLIN – SCHALL UND RAUCH – 1920s
cabaret of Max Reinhardt

GERMANY – BERLIN – SCHAUBUHNE AM LEHNINER
PLATZ – Wilmersdorf, Kurfürstendamm 153 / Lehniner Platz – Built 1927-1929 as
"Universum-Kino" cinema by , as a part of the WOGA-Komplex (built 1926-1931)
that also included the cabaret "Kabarett der Komiker" (built 1926-1928), a
restaurant, a hotel, shops and apartments. Later renamed "Kino Capitol", and
"Café Ricci". All parts of the WOGA-Komplex were severely damaged in World War
II – "Universum-Kino" building partly reconstructed in 1950/1951. 1963 façade
restorations. 1963-1964 partly reconstruction of the whole complex. 1975-1981
major reconstruction of the "Universum-Kino". Reopened 1981 as "Schaubühne am
Lehniner Platz". Home to the "Schaubühne" drama company that had previously
operated at the "Schaubühne am Halleschen Ufer"

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS
Mitte, Gendarmenmarkt – Built 1800-1801 as "Königliches National-Theater", next
to the old "Nationaltheater" (built 1776 as "Französisches Komödienhaus" – 1786
renovated, 1787 renamed "Nationaltheater", demolished 1802 after the opening of
the new theatre). Opened 1802. 1811 renamed "Schauspielhaus", used by the
"Königliche Schauspiele" company. Destroyed by a fire 1817 – From 1818-1821, a
new Schauspielhaus was built on the site by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS/KONZERTHAUS
– Mitte, Gendarmenmarkt – Built 1818-1821 as "Königliches Schauspielhaus", using
the remains of the previous Schauspielhaus (built 1801, destroyed by a fire in
1817). Opened 1821 – complex included a theatre with 1600 seats and a smaller
concert hall. 1848 occoupied by armed forces. 1852-1853 rebuilding. 1905 major
rebuilding. 1919 renamed "Staatstheater". 1935 reconstruction of the original
concert hall and reconstruction of original theatre auditorium. 1935 renamed
"Staatstheater – Großes Haus". Damaged by bombs in 1943, restored. Nearly
completely destroyed by bombs on 1945 – From 1967, exterior rebuilding to the
original designs. 1979-1984 interior rebuilding as a concert hall with three
venues: a great hall (1850 seats), a chamber music hall (ca. 450 seats), and the
"Musikclub". Re-opened 1984 as "Konzerthaus am Gendarmenmarkt" with a symphonic
concert. Since 1984, home to the Berliner Symphonie-Orchester (BSO). 1994
renamed "Konzerthaus Berlin". Currently used for symphonic and chamber concerts

GERMANY – BERLIN – SCHILLER – 1906

GERMANY – BERLIN – SCHILLER-THEATER OLD AND
NEW – Charlottenburg, Bismarckstraße 110 – Built 1905-1906 for the city of
Charlottenburg and the "Schiller-Theater AG". Home to the
"Schiller-Theater-Gesellschaft" drama company. In the 1920s and 1930s, used as
an additional location of the Prussian state drama company (whose main home was
the "Schauspielhaus"). 1194 seats; 1937-1938 major exterior reconstruction (new
façades) and interior reconstruction (simplification and addition of a
government box) for the city of Berlin. Subsequently used as a municipal theatre
by the city of Berlin. 1200 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1943 – 1950-1951, a new
Schiller-Theater was built at the site – Built 1950-1951 for the city of Berlin,
using some remains of the previous Schiller-Theater building (built 1905-1906,
destroyed by bombs 1943). Home to the "Staatliche Schauspielbühnen" state drama
theatre company that used the Schiller-Theater as "Großes Haus" (and the
Schloßpark-Theater as "Kleines Haus"). 1067 seats. Closed 1993 – Currently used
as a private theatre for performances of musicals and concerts

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SCHLOBPARK-THEATER
Steglitz, Schloßstraße 48 / Wrangelstraße 2 – Built 1804 as horse stables and
garden hall of the neighbouring palace, "Guthaus Steglitz" (later known as
restaurant "Wrangelschlößchen") – 1920-1921 converted to a theatre. Opened 1921
as "Schloßpark-Theater". 1935-1945 used as a cinema. 1945 reconstruction. From
1950, operated by the city of Berlin. From 1951, part of the "Staatliche
Schauspielbühnen Berlin", operated as "Kleines Haus" (with the
"Schiller-Theater" as "Großes Haus"). Used for smaller drama performances,
including many German premieres of international modern classics. Closed 1993.
Re-opened 1995 as a private theatre. Used for drama and musical performances.
Closed 2002

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SCHLOBTHEATER CHARLOTTENBURG
– Charlottenburg, Spandauer Damm 22 (next to the Orangerie building) – Built
1787-1791. Ca. 700-800 seats. 1817 auditorium alterations. Closed 1881.
Subsequently used as a furniture warehouse. Interior destroyed by bombs in 1943;
In the 1950s, exterior rebuilding to the original designs, interior
reconstruction as a museum. Since 1960, used by the "Museum für Vor- und
Frühgeschichte" (that will move to the "Neues Museum" after restoration works
there are finished)

GERMANY – BERLIN – SIMPLICISSIMUS – 1920s
cabaret – Isadora Duncan

GERMANY – BERLIN –
SPORTPALAST

GERMANY – BERLIN – STAATSBALLETT BERLIN – a
merging the opera houses’ three ballet companies

GERMANY – BERLIN – STAATSOPER UNTER DEN
LINDEN – Mitte, Unter den Linden 5-7 – Built 1741-1743 by as "Königliches
Opernhaus". The building comprised three separate halls: the foyer and banquet
hall "Apollosaal", the "Tanz- und Theatersaal" (used as main auditorium for
opera performances), and the "Korinthischer Saal" (used as stage for opera
performances), all of which could be linked mechanically to form one big festive
hall; 1787 auditorium rebuilding – Auditorium destroyed by a fire in 1843.
1843-1844 auditorium rebuilding, rebuilding of concert hall "Apollosaal", and
extension of the stagehouse. – 1867-1869 extension of the stagehouse to the
south. 1919 renamed "Staatsoper". After the 1910 and 1926-1928 rebuidlings –
Damaged by bombs 1941. Rebuilt 1941-1942. Again destroyed by bombs1945. From
1945 to 1955, the opera company performed in the "Theater im Admiralspalast"
(today’s "Metropol-Theater"); 1952-1955 rebuilt as "Deutsche Staatsoper".
Exterior rebuilt. "Apollosaal" (250 seats) rebuilt freely. Auditorium rebuilt.
1400 seats. Re-opened 1955 – In the mid-1990s renamed "Staatsoper Unter den
Linden". Used for performances of the resident state opera and ballet companies

GERMANY – BERLIN –
STAATSTHEATER KLEINES HAUS
– Tiergarten, Nürnberger Straße 70-71 / Budapester Straße 35 – Built 1911 as
"Kurfürstenoper". Used as an opera theatre and for arts and crafts exhibitions.
1091 seats (+ 40 standing); 1913 bought by the theatre director Max Epstein;
rebuilt. Re-opened 1913 as "Deutsche Künstler Theater-Sozietät". 1915 renamed
"Deutsches Künstlertheater"; 1935 nationalized and renamed "Staatstheater –
Kleines Haus". Stagehouse and auditorium rebuilt – used as a drama theatre by
the "Staatschauspiel" state drama company (that used Schinkel’s Schauspielhaus
as "Großes Haus") – 980 seats (+ 33 standing). Destroyed by bombs in 1943.
Remains demolished in 1963 – 1983-1985 a bank office building was built on the
site

GERMANY – BERLIN –
STADTISCHE OPER
Charlottenburg, Bismarckstraße 34-37 – Built 1911-1912 as "Deutsches Opernhaus"
for the city of Charlottenburg. 1924 renamed "Städtische Oper". 1934
nationalized. 1935 extension by an administrative wing, façade alterations,
rebuilding of auditorium. Originally 2300 seats, after 1935: 2098 seats.
Auditorium completely destroyed, stagehouse, technical and administrative wing
damaged by bombs 1943; In 1945, the "Städtische Oper" company moved to the
"Theater des Westens". In 1961, the company was renamed "Deutsche Oper Berlin"
and moved back to Bismarckstraße into the new "Deutsche Oper Berlin" building at
the site of the old theatre

GERMANY – BERLIN –
THEATER AM KURFURSTENDAMM
– Charlottenburg, Kurfürstendamm 208-209 – Originally built 1904-1905. 1908
installation of a theatre hall. 1921-1923 installation of a theatre proper. 1925
rebuilt. 1930-1931 major rebuilding for the theatre director, Max Reinhardt.
1936 rebuilt. Damaged in World War II. After 1945, restoration and auditorium
simplification. Used by the "Freie Volksbühne" company. 1971 exterior
rebuilding, incorporating the theatre hall in the new "Kurfürstendamm-Karree"
complex. Used as a private theatre for light drama and comedy performances

GERMANY – BERLIN –
THEATER AM NOLLENDORFPLATZ
– Schöneberg, Nollendorfplatz 5 / Motzstraße 1-3 / Nollendorfstr. 11-12 – Built
1906 as "Neues Schauspielhaus"/"Mozartsaal" – complex included a theatre, a
concert hall, a restaurant, apartments, and offices. Later renamed "Theater am
Nollendorfplatz"; Neues Schauspielhaus: Opened 1906. 1260 seats. Destroyed by
bombs in World War II; Mozartsaal: Concert hall. 1364 seats. Since 1911, used as
a cinema. 1928 rebuilt. Currently used by the discotheque "Metropol"

GERMANY – BERLIN – THEATER AM
SCHIFFBAUERDAMM – Happy End 1929

GERMANY – BERLIN – THEATER DER FREUNDSCHAFT

GERMANY – BERLIN –
THEATER DES WESTENS
Charlottenburg, Kantstraße 9-12 – Built 1895-1896 as a private theatre for
"Theater des Westens GmbH". From 1898, used as an opera theatre. Re-opened 1898.
From, 1909 used as an operetta theatre. Destroyed by a fire on 1912 – rebuilt.
From 1922, again used as opera theatre by the "Große Volksoper" company. Closed
1924. 1933 re-opened as "Volksoper", a part of the Nazi "Kraft durch Freude"
programme (also known as "Ley-Haus"). Closed 1944. Auditorium roof damaged in
World War II. 1945 auditorium roof provisionally rebuilt. From 1945, home to the
"Städtische Oper" company. 1950 foyer rebuilding. Since 1961, used as an
operetta and musical theatre after the "Städtische Oper" company had moved to
the new "Deutsche Oper Berlin". Re-opened 1961 with Lerner and Loewe’s "My Fair
Lady". 1962 modernization and rebuilding. Re-opened as a musical theatre with
Kander & Ebb’s "Cabaret". 1984 restoration of auditorium. 1988 exterior
restoration

GERMANY – BERLIN – THEATRE IN BEHRENSTRASSE
– 1764

GERMANY – BERLIN –
THEATER IN DER KLOSTERSTRABE
– Mitte, Klosterstraße 43 – Built 1924 as "Goethe-Bühne", converting a 1721-1726
church. Later renamed "Theater in der Klosterstraße". 776 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
THEATER UNTER DEN LINDEN

GERMANY – BERLIN –
TRANENPALAST – Mitte,
Reichstagufer 17 (off Friedrichstraße) – Built ca. 1961 as a customs clearance
room at the "Friedrichstraße" railway station, popularly known as "Tränenpalast"
[tears palace] since it was there that East Berliners had to say good-bye to
their visitors from the West. Closed 1989. 1991 converted to a theatre and
concert hall, and officially named "Tränenpalast". Used for theatre and comedy
performances, concerts and other events

GERMANY – BERLIN –
URANIA – Schöneberg,
An der Urania 17 / Kleiststraße – [The first "Urania" was built in 1888-1889 in
Invalidenstraße 57 for the private society "Urania". The complex housed a public
observatory, a scientific theatre, and a physical cabinet. Opened 1889. Closed
1896 (observatory closed later during World War II). Later used by
administration offices. Destroyed in World War II. Subsequently the site was
used by a teacher’s college. 1965 reconstruction of the scientific theatre to
the original site. Currently used by a police office; The 2nd "Urania" was built
1896 in Taubenstraße 48-49. The complex included a theatre hall (700 seats), a
main auditorium (200 seats) and various smaller rooms. Also used as a premiere
theatre for UFA documentary movies. Closed 1928. Destroyed in World War II – In
West Berlin, a new society, "Deutsche Kultur-Gemeinschaft Urania Berlin e. V."
was founded in 1953 – society opened a new "Urania" building in 1962; In East
Berlin, a popular scientific society was founded in 1954 that was renamed
"Urania" in 1966. This society did not have an own building but operated in
lecture rooms throughout the GDR. Dissolved in 1990 in favour of several
regional organizations; Built 1962 for the West Berlin private society,
"Deutsche Kultur-Gemeinschaft Urania Berlin e.V." Opened 10 Nov 1962. Used for
lectures, cabaret performances, movies, concerts, and various other events. The
complex includes numerous lecture rooms, a theatre hall, and two cinema halls
(860 and 320 seats)

GERMANY – BERLIN –
VICTORIA-THEATER
Mitte, Münzstraße – Built 1856-1859 as a private theatre. Construction works
stopped in 1858 because of financial problems. Subequently completed. The
complex included two big auditoriums, "Sommertheater" (summer theatre, 1400
seats, opened Dec 1859) and "Wintertheater" (winter theatre, 1432 seats, opened
1860), sharing a single stage. The two auditoriums could also be converted to a
single big ballroom. Used for comedy, light drama, Italian opera, ballet, and
revue performances. Also used as a guest venue, e. g. for gala performances of
the Meiningen theatre. Closed 1891 for financial reasons. Subsequently
demolished

GERMANY – BERLIN – VOLKSBUHNE (Peoples
Theatre) – Mitte, Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz (formerly: Bülowplatz) – Built 1913-1914
for "Neue Freie Volksbühne e. V." on the site of the demolished
"Scheunenviertel" quarter. 1933-1945 part of the Nazi "Kraft durch Freude"
programme (name changed to "Theater am Horst-Wessel-Platz"). Stagehouse
destroyed by bombs on 20 Nov 1943. Remaining parts destroyed by a fire 1945.
1953-1954 rebuilding. 1956 installation of the studio stage "Theater im 3.
Stock" in the third floor. 1972 auditorium reconstruction. Originally 1968
seats, 1954: 1174 seats, today: 820 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
WALDBUHNE
Charlottenburg, Glockenturmstraße / Passenheimer Straße – Built 1936 as
"Dietrich-Eckart-Bühne" open-air theatre Part of the "Reichssportfeld" complex
built for the 1936 Olympic Games. Opened 1936 with "Frankenburger Würfelspiel"
(with over 1000 performers). After World War II, renamed "Waldbühne" [forest
stage]. 1982 installation of a stage roof. 22,000 seats. Currently used for pop
and classical concerts, and as an open-air cinema

GERMANY – BERLIN –
WALHALLA-THEATER

GERMANY – BERLIN – WHITE MOUSE – 1920s
cabaret – 99 seats

GERMANY – BERLIN –
WILHELMSHALLEN

GERMANY – BERLIN –
WINTERGARTEN – OLD
Mitte, Friedrichstraße 143-149 / Dorotheenstraße (in the "Central-Hotel") –
Built 1880 as winter garden for the guests of the Central-Hotel. Originally used
for concerts and balls. From 1884, used as a theatre. From 1888, used as a
variety theatre. Destroyed by bombs 1944; In 1992, a new "Wintergarten" variety
theatre opened at another location in Potsdamer Straße 96

GERMANY – BERNBURG –
CARL-MARIA-VON-WEBER-THEATER
– Schloßstraße 20 – Built 1825-1827 as "Herzogliches Schauspielhaus" – 1881
donated to the city of Bernburg. 1881-1882 major rebuilding and extension.
Renamed "Städtisches Schauspielhaus" (also known as "Stadttheater"). 1927-1928
rebuilding and extension. 1827-1938 used for guest opera and drama performances
by companies from neighbouring cities and by touring companies. 1938-1944 home
to the "Landesbühne Magdeburg-Anhalt" company. Closed 1944 due to World War II.
Re-opened 1945 as "Stadttheater". 1951-1953 operated as "Salzlandtheater"
together with the theatre of Staßfurt. 1954 renamed
"Carl-Maria-von-Weber-Theater". Subsequently mainly used for opera performances
by the resident company. 1957 alterations 1988-1992 operated together with the
theatre of Wittenberg. 1993-1997 major renovations. Re-opened 1997 as a guest
venue for opera and drama performances by touring companies. Until 1992: 386
seats, currently 344 seats

GERMANY – BERNBURG –
KURHAUS

GERMANY – BIBERACH –
STADTTHEATER
Theaterstraße – Built 1858. 1901-1904 closed due to fire safety concerns.
Subsequently rebuilding. Re-opened 1905. 1925-1926 rebuilding and extension.
Re-opened 1926. Until 1924, mainly used for regular winter seasons by different
touring companies. Later, mainly used for touring performances. Until 1941, also
used as a cinema. Throughout its history, also used for amateur drama
performances by the "Dramatischer Verein" company, and annual school theatre
performances ("Schützentheater") during the Schützenfest festival. Demolished
1977 in favour of a new theatre and congress hall, "Stadthalle" (built
1974-1978)

GERMANY – BIELEFELD –
CAPITOL

GERMANY – BIELEFELD –
RUDOLF-OETKER-HALLE
Lampingstraße 16 – Built 1929-1930. The complex includes two halls: Großer Saal
(1561 seats + 84 seats with reduced sight) and Kleiner Saal (up to 296 seats).
Used for symphonic concerts, chamber concerts, congresses and exhibitions

GERMANY – BIELEFELD –
STADTTHEATER
Niederwall 27 – Built 1902-1904. 1937 exterior alterations, major interior
redecoration. Heavily damaged by bombs 1944. 1949-1950 rebuilding (exterior to
modificated original plans, interior to modern plans). 1960 exterior rebuilding
(removing the original decoration). 1977-1979 exterior restoration. Major
interior rebuilding scheduled for 2004-2006 – Used for opera, drama, and ballet
performances by the resident companies. 775 seats

GERMANY – BIELEFELD –
THEATER AM ALTEN MARKT
– Alter Markt 1 – Also known as "Brücke". The building includes a drama theatre
and a studio theatre, "TAMoben". Used for performances by the Stadttheater
Bielefeld companies. Scheduled for closure in ca. 2006

GERMANY – BINGEN –
FESTHALLE

GERMANY – BINZ –
KURHAUS

GERMANY – BITTERFELD –
KULTURPALAST
Zörbiger Straße / Parsevalstraße – Built 1952-1954 as "Kulturpalast der
Gewerkschaften ‘Wilhelm Pieck’". Opened 1954 The complex includes two halls:
"Theatersaal" [Theatre Hall] with 1000 seats and "Kleiner Saal" [Small Hall]
with up to 150 seats. Closed 2003 due to safety concerns. The
Chemiepark-Gesellschaft plans to renovate and re-open the house

GERMANY – BOBLINGEN –
KONGREBHALLE

GERMANY – BOCHUM –
FREILICHTBUHNE WATTENSCHEID
– Wattenscheid, Stadtgarten / Parkstraße – Open-air theatre, built in the 1930s
as "Thingstätte" for Nazi performances. Opened 1937. 2500 seats. Currently used
for drama and musical performances and for concerts

GERMANY – BOCHUM –
JAHRHUNDERTHALLE

GERMANY – BOCHUM –
MUSICALTHEATER – –
Special venue built for Starlight Express – almost 5,500 performances

GERMANY – BOCHUM –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS
Königsallee 15 / Oskar-Hoffmann-Straße – Built 1952-1953 for the city of Bochum,
on the site of the former "Stadttheater" (built 1908, rebuilt 1915, destroyed by
bombs in 1944). 1966 extension by a chamber theatre "Kammerspiele" (400 seats).
The complex also includes a basement studio theatre. Main theatre: Originally
922, currently 811 seats. Used for drama performances by the resident company

GERMANY – BOCHUM –
STADTTHEATER
Königsallee 15 / Oskar-Hoffmann-Straße – Built 1908 as "Apollo-Theater" (also
known as "Orpheum"). Originally intended as a variety theatre with 2000 seats.
Closed 1912 due to financial problems. Subsequently demolition works. 1914
bought by the city of Bochum. 1914-1915 rebuilding. 930 seats. Re-opened as
"Stadttheater". 1915-1919 used for guest performances by the theatre companies
from Düsseldorf and Essen. Since 1919, used for drama performances by the
resident company. 1921 installation of a revolving stage. Destroyed by bombs in
1944 – 1952-1953, the "Schauspielhaus" was built on the site

GERMANY – BOHLEN-
KLUBHAUS

GERMANY – BONN –
BEETHOVENHALLE – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – BONN –
METROPOL-THEATER

GERMANY – BONN –
OPERNHAUS – Am
Boeselagerhof 1 – Built 1961-1965 as "Theater der Stadt" for the city of Bonn.
896 seats. Later mainly known as "Opernhaus". Used for opera, musical and ballet
performances by the resident companies

GERMANY – BONN –
STADTHALLE – Gronau –
Built 1899-1901. Capacity: over 3000 persons. Severely damaged in World War II.
Remains demolished in 1962

GERMANY – BONN –
STADTISCHE BUHNEN (1965)

GERMANY – BONN-BAD GODESBERG –
KAMMERSPIELE – Bad
Godesberg, Am Michaelshof 9 – Built 1951-1952 as "Stadttheater Bad Godesberg"
for the city of Bad Godesberg – used as a guest venue for performances by
touring companies, and as a cinema – renamed "Kammerspiele Bad Godesberg"- used
for drama performances by the resident "Theater Bonn" municipal drama company

GERMANY – BONN-BAD GODESBERG –
KURFURSTLICHES THEATER
– Bad Godesberg, Kurfürstenallee 1a (near the "Redoute") – Built ca. 1790 as
"Kurfürstliches Theater". 2000 exterior renovation, conversion into an
exhibition centre. Re-opened as "Haus an der Redoute". Currently used for
exhibitions, official functions by the municipal authorities, and for concerts

GERMANY – BONN-BAD GODESBERG –
REDOUTE – Bad
Godesberg, Kurfürstenallee 1 (near the former "Kurfürstliches Theater") – Built
1790-1792 as a ballroom, casino and concert hall for prince bishop Max Franz.
Closed 1819. Later used as a private home by the van der Heydt family, later as
an art gallery, and after that as a boarding school. 1856 bought and used the
building as a private home, participating in private chamber concerts. 1920
bought by the city of Godesberg. Used for concerts and exhibitions. Since 1953
used for official functions by the West German Foreign Ministery. Ca. 1972 major
renovations. The building includes two halls – "Beethovensaal" (305 seats) and
"Gartensaal" (170 seats) – and four function rooms. Currently used for private
balls, functions, and small congresses

GERMANY – BONN-BAD GODESBERG –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – BONN-BAD GODESBERG –
WELTTHEATER

GERMANY – BORNA –
KREISTHEATER

GERMANY – BRAND-ERBISDORF –
THEATER DER FREUNDSCHAFT

GERMANY – BRANDENBURG (HAVEL) –
BRANDENBURGER THEATER (old)
Grabenstraße – Built as "Stadthalle". Since 1945, home to the municipal opera
and drama companies. 1952 and 1953 rebuildings. Renamed "Brandenburger Theater".
307 seats. Demolished on 17 Oct 1997 in favour of a new congress and culture
centre

GERMANY – BRAUNSCHWEIG –
HOFTHEATER – OLD
Hagenmarkt – Built 1690. 1735 extension. 1818 renamed "Nationaltheater". 1826
renamed "Hoftheater". Closed 1861 when it was replaced by a new "Hoftheater" at
another site. Demolished 1864

GERMANY – BRAUNSCHWEIG –
STAATSTHEATER – Am
Theater – Built 1859-1861 as "Herzogliches Hoftheater", as a successor to the
old "Hoftheater" at another site (opened 1690, closed 1861). Interior rebuilt
1902-1904. 1919 renamed "Braunschweigisches Landestheater". 1938 renamed
"Braunschweigisches Staatstheater". Destroyed by a fire after bombings in 1944.
1945-1948 rebuilding. Re-opened 1948. Originally 1600, today 900 seats

GERMANY – BRAUNSCHWEIG –
STADTHALLE
Leonhardplatz – complex includes three halls: "Großer Saal" (2300 seats),
"Congress Saal" (500 seats), and "Vortragssaal" (156 seats) – symphonic concerts
by Staatsorchester Braunschweig, musical performances, pop concerts,
conventions, and other events

GERMANY – BRAUNSCHWEIG –
THINGPLATZ
Braunschweig – Open-air theatre, built 1935 as a "Thingstätte" for Nazi
performances

GERMANY – BREMEN –
GLOCKE

GERMANY – BREMEN – OPERA HOUSE – 1950 –
replaces one bombed during WWII

GERMANY – BREMEN –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD

GERMANY – BREMEN –
STAATSTHEATER – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – BREMEN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – BREMEN –
TIVOLI-THEATER/ALADIN
– Hemelingen, An der Weide – Built ca. 1890 as "Tivoli-Theater". Also known as
""Luers’ Tivoli". Used as a ballroom, variety theatre, and restaurant. Total
capacity: 2700 persons. In the 1920s extension by a cinema (900 seats). Closed
1975. 1977 re-opening of the former cinema as "Aladin Music Hall". Subsequently
used for rock and jazz concerts, and as a discotheqe. 1991 re-opening of the
former ballroom as "Luer’s Tivoli"

GERMANY – BREMEN –
WINTERGARTEN

GERMANY – BREMERHAVEN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – BREMERHAVEN –
STADTHEATER
Theodor-Heuss-Platz 2-8 – Built 1910-1911 for the city of Bermerhaven, followed
by an adjacent museum, Kunsthalle (1911-1912). Opened 1911. 1937 extension of
the backstage area. Destroyed by bombs 1944, with only the ground floor,
staircases and façade remaining. 1950-1952 rebuilt to simplified designs.
Re-opened 1952. 1955 conversion of parts of the former "Kunsthalle" museum into
a drama studio theatre with 119 seats. 1993-1997 rebuilding of the main entrance
and foyers. 1999-2000 restorations. Re-opened 2000. Originally 990 seats, ca.
1940: 979 seats, today 722 seats

GERMANY – BRUHL –
PHANTASIALAND; CINE 2000

GERMANY – BUCKEBURG-
THEATERSAAL IM RATHAUS
– Rathaus, Am Markt 4 – Built 1905-1906 as a theatre within the town hall
complex for the city of Bückeburg. Opened 10 Oct 1906. Ca. 700 seats. Also known
as "Rathaussaal". Used as a guest venue for performances by touring companies

GERMANY – BRUNSWICK – theatre 1948 –
replacing one destroyed in WWII

GERMANY – CELLE – between Hanover and
Hamburg – castle contains oldest existing playhouse in Germany – seats 330 –
1674 – 1935 restored and redecorated – reopened in 1950 as permanent repertory
theatre

GERMANY – CELLE-
SCHLOBTHEATER
Schloßplatz 1 (Schloß) – Built 1670-1674. 1690 extension by a second balcony.
1772-1774 damaged by French troups, subsequently rebuilt. 1837 rebuilding. 1855
redecoration. Closed 1859. 1935-1938 renovation. While the decoration has been
altered various times, the basic structure of the original 1674 auditorium is
still visible. 330 seats. 1938-1945 used as a drama theatre. After World War II,
occasionally used by touring companies. Since 1957, used for drama performances
by the resident "Celler Schloßtheater" company. 1966 installation of a studio
stage in the "Malersaal"

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
CENTRAL-THEATER
Zwickauer Straße – Variety theatre, built 1901-1902. Opened 6 Dec 1902. 2000
seats. Destroyed by bombs 1945. Remains later demolished

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
KULTURPALAST SIEGMAR
– Siegmar, Unritzstraße 40 / Pelzmühlenstraße – Built 1949-1950 as "Kulturpalast
der Bergarbeiter", for the "Sowjetische AG Wismut" uranium mining corporation.
Used for theatre performances and as a ballroom. Also known as "Kulturpalast der
Werktätigen" and "Kulturhaus". 1968-1970 conversion to a TV studio for the
"Fernsehen der DDR" company. 1990 technological modernizations. Since 1990, used
as a TV studio by "Mitteldeutscher Rundfunk" (MDR)

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
METROPOL-THEATER
Zwickauer Straße 11 – Built 1913-1914 as "Metropol-Theater". Originally a
variety theatre, later converted to a cinema. Operated by the Ufa circuit. 1998
renovations. Since then operated by the Union-Kino circuit. Also known as
"Metropol Filmtheater" and "Kino Metropol"

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
NATURTHEATER RABENSTEIN
– "Felsendome Rabenstein" mining museum – Built 1926. Demolished

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
NEUE WELT

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
OPERNHAUS
Theaterplatz 2 (formerly: Neustädter Markt) – Built 1906-1909 as "Neues
Stadttheater" . Used for opera, drama, and ballet performances by the resident
companies. 1925 renamed "Opernhaus". Since then, used for opera and ballet
performances by the resident companies. 1287 seats. Destroyed by bombs in World
War II, with only the exterior walls remaining; 1949-1951 rebuilding to modern
plans within the original exterior walls. 1988-1992 exterior restoration to the
original designs, extension by a functional building, interior rebuilding to
modern plans. Re-opened 1992 – 720 seats

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD
– Theaterstraße – Built 1836-1838 as "Stadttheater". Used for opera and drama
performances. 1863-1865 rebuilding. Closed 1909 in favour of the "Neues
Stadttheater". Re-opened 1925 as "Schauspielhaus" and used exclusively for drama
performances. Ca. 1930 various extensions. Ca. 900 seats. Destroyed by bombs in
1945. Remains later demolished; The currently operating "Schauspielhaus" theatre
is located at another site

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
STADTHALLE
Theaterstraße / Am Wall / Straße der Nationen / Brückenstraße – Built 1969-1974.
The complex includes two halls, "Großer Saal" (1780 seats) and "Kleiner Saal"
(562 seats), various function rooms, and a hotel tower. 1972-1976 installation
of an organ. 1995 new façade decoration. Home to the
Robert-Schumann-Philharmonie Chemnitz. Used for classical and pop concerts,
musical theatre and drama performances, congresses and various festivities

GERMANY – CHEMNITZ-
THALIA-THEATER
Chemnitz – Part of the "Tivoli" restaurant and entertainment area

GERMANY – COBURG-
KONGREBHALLE

GERMANY – COBURG-
LANDESTHEATER
Schlossplatz 6 – Built 1837-1840 as "Herzogliches Hoftheater". 1857 interior
alterations (extension of auditorium boxes, installation of proscenium boxes).
Ca. 1918 renamed "Landestheater". 1970-1977 major renovation and modernization.
Used for opera, ballet and drama performances by the resident companies.
Originally ca. 1000 seats, today: 557 seats

GERMANY – COLOGNE –
MUSICAL DOME – Spamalot – Jan 2009;

GERMANY – COLOGNE – Opera House – destroyed
during WWII – new opera house opened 1957

GERMANY – COTTBUS-
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – COTTBUS-
STAATSTHEATER
Schillerplatz 1 / Schillerow namesto 1 – Built 1907-1908 as "Stadttheater" for
the city of Cottbus. 1910-1912 extension by a functional tract. 1982-1987 major
exterior and interior restoration. 1992 renamed "Staatstheater". Ca. 680 seats.
Used for opera and drama performances by the resident companies

GERMANY – COTTBUS-
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – CRIMMITSCHAU-
KREISTHEATER

GERMANY – DAMROSCH OPERA COMPANY – 1894 –
later became Damrosch-Ellis Co – dissolved 1900

GERMANY – DARMSTADT-
LANDESTHEATER

GERMANY – DARMSTADT-
LANDESTHEATER KLEINES HAUS

GERMANY – DARMSTADT-
STAATSTHEATER

GERMANY – DESSAU-
ANHALTISCHES THEATER
– Friedensplatz 1 – Built 1935-1938 as "Dessauer Theater". Opened 1938 with
Weber’s "Der Freischütz", in the presence of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.
Severely damaged by bombs on 1944 and 1945. 1947-1949 rebuilt. Renamed
"Landestheater". In 1950, site of the first show trial in the GDR (known as
"DCGG-Prozess"). 1973 installation of a studio stage (80 seats). Ca. 1994
renamed "Anhaltisches Theater". Originally 1269 seats, currently 1049 seats.
Used for opera, drama, and ballet performances by the resident companies

GERMANY – DESSAU-
FRIEDRICH-THEATER
Built 1623 as a riding hall. 1794-1798 used as a theatre. 1922-1923 major
rebuilding and conversion to a theatre, after the "Friedrich-Theater"
(previously: "Hoftheater") had been destroyed by a fire in 1922. Re-opened 1 Feb
1923 as "Friedrich-Theater". Used for opera, drama, and ballet performances by
the resident companies until the opening of the "Dessauer Theater" (today:
"Anhaltisches Theater") in 1938

GERMANY – DESSAU-
HERZOGLICHES HOFTHEATER
– 1st theatre on the site built 1798, 1820 rebuilding, destroyed by fire on 7
Mar 1855 – Built 1856 as "Herzogliches Hoftheater". 1918 renamed
"Friedrich-Theater". Destroyed by a fire 1922, with only the façade surviving.
Remains converted to a café and operated as "Kaffee Altes Theater". Destroyed in
World War II

GERMANY – DETMOLD-
LIPPISCHES LANDESTHEATER
– Theaterplatz 1 – Built 1914-1918 by the "Lippischer Theaterverein" society, on
the site of the former "Hoftheater" (built 1825, destroyed by fire in 1912).
Opened 1919 as "Lippisches Landestheater". 1968-1969 rear extension by rehearsal
facilities and technical rooms. 679 seats. Used for opera, ballet, and drama
performances by the resident "Landestheater Detmold" companies

GERMANY – DILLIGEN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – DINSLAKEN-
STADTHALLE – Platz
d’Agen 2 / Althoffstraße – Multi-purpose hall, built 1971-1973. Operated as part
of the "DIN A 4 Dinslakener Veranstaltungs- und Gastronomiezentrum". Main hall:
up to 600 seats

GERMANY – DOBELN-
CAPITOL – cinema

GERMANY – DOBELN-
STADTHEATER

GERMANY – DORTMUND-
FREILICHTBUHNE
BUSCHMUHLENTEICH

GERMANY – DORTMUND-
KONZERTHAUS – Opened
Sep 2002

GERMANY – DORTMUND-
OLYMPIA-THEATER

GERMANY – DORTMUND-
STADTHEATER – 1904-1950-1966

GERMANY – DORTMUND-
WALHALLA-SINGSPIELHALLEN

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
BELVEDERE – Altstadt,
Brühlsche Terrasse – Built 1842 as fourth "Belvedere" building on the site by W.
O. von Wolframsdorf – complex contained two concert/festivity halls. Used for
cabaret performances and concerts. Destroyed by bombs 1945. Remains later
demolished

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
CENTRAL-THEATER
Altstadt, Prager Straße / Waisenhausstraße – Built 1897-1900 at the former site
of the "Boxbergisches Palais". Opened 1898 as a private theatre. Used for
operetta and ballet performances. Capacity: ca. 2000 persons. Destroyed by bombs
in 1945. Remains later demolished

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
CIRCUS SARRASANI

GERMANY – DRESDEN – DRESDEN STAATSTHEATER

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
FESTSPIELHAUS HELLERAU
– Hellerau, Karl-Liebknecht-Straße 56 – Built 1911-1912 as "Festspielhaus der
Bildungsanstalt für rhythmische Gymnastik Emile Jaques-Dalcroze" [festival house
of the ballet school Emile Jaques-Dalcroze], as a part of the "Gartenstadt
Hellerau" quarter. First modern "Raumbühne" stage without any division of stage
and auditorium. Light system (with 7000 lamps). Subsequently a centre of the
European avantgarde. Used as a military hospital in World War I. Rebuilt in the
1930s. 1937 destruction of the accompanying buildings, extension by side wings.
From 1937 used as a police school, later used by the SA and SS. From 1945, used
as a military hospital by the Red Army. Since 1992 used for ballet performances
and various art projects

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
FREILICHTBUHNE IM GROBEN
GARTEN
– Großer Garten – Open-air park theatre. Former name:
Freilichtbühne "Junge Garde"

GERMANY – DRESDEN – HOFTHEATER – 1841 –
Altstadt, Theaterplatz – First theatre on another site at the Theaterplatz
square: "Kleines Hoftheater" (built 1755, demolished 1841). Built 1838-1841.
Opened 1841. Destroyed by a fire 1869. Six weeks after the destruction of the
theatre, performances were resumed at a provisory "Interimstheater" located just
behind the Hoftheater which was used until the opening of Sempers second
Hoftheater (Semperoper) at the site of the 1841 building

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
INTERIMSTHEATER – 1869
– Altstadt, Große Packhofstraße (just behind the Hoftheater ruin/construction
site on Theaterplatz) – Built 1869 within six weeks as a provisionally theatre
after a fire had destroyed Gottfried Semper’s first Hoftheater. 1800 seats. Last
performance 1878, shortly before Semper’s second Hoftheater (Semperoper) opened
in 1878. Subsequently demolished

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
JAHRESSCHAU DEUTSCHER
ARBEIT: LICHTSPIELE
– cinema

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
KABARETT ALTMARKT
cabaret

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
KLEINS HOFTHEATER – 1755
– Altstadt, Theaterplatz – Built 1755. Named "Kleines Hoftheater" [small court
theatre] to distinguish it from the "Großes Opernhaus am Zwinger" (built
1718-1719, converted in to a concert hall in 1772, destroyed by a fire in 1849).
Originally built from wood, rebuilt 1761 from stone. After 1772, the "Kleines
Hoftheater" became the main venue for opera and theatre performances in Dresden.
Demolished 1841 after Semper’s first Hoftheater (built 1838-1841, destroyed by a
fire in 1869) was opened at another site (directly neighbouring the Kleines
Hoftheater) on Theaterplatz

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
KULTURPALAST
Altstadt, Neumarkt – Built 1966-1969 The complex includes the concert hall
"Festsaal" (2400 seats), a chamber theatre, and various function rooms (for 1200
visitors). Home to the "Dresdner Philharmonie" orchestra. Used for congresses,
classical concerts, and pop concerts

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
MUSEN-HALLE – Löbtau,
Kesselsdorfer Straße 17 / Poststraße – Built in the 1890s. Used for variety
performances, concerts, as a ballroom and for church services. Closed in the
1920s. Subsequently used as a department store. 1919 re-opened as a cinema,
"Lichtspiele Musenhalle" (also known as "Li-Mu"). Destroyed by bombs in February
1945

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
NEUSTADTER HOFTHEATER
– Neustadt, Albertplatz – Built 1871-1874. Opened December 1873 as "Neustädter
Hoftheater – Königliches Schauspielhaus". Operated as Royal Drama Theatre. Also
known as "Albert-Theater". 1904 extension. From 1913, used as a private theatre.
From 1937, operated by the city of Dresden as "Theater des Volkes". 1937
restorations and modernization. Ca. 1400 seats. Destroyed by bombs in 1945.
Remains later demolished

GERMANY – DRESDEN – OPERA HOUSE – 1841 –
burned down and rebuilt1869-78 – was bombed in 1944 – reopened 1985

GERMANY – DRESDEN – OPERA HOUSES – built in
1667, 1761

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
RESIDENZTHEATER
Altstadt, Zirkusstraße 41 – Built 1871-1872. Opened May 1871. 1222 seats.
Destroyed by bombs in 1945. Remains later demolished

GERMANY – DRESDEN – SCHAUSPIELHAUS –
Altstadt, Ostra-Allee 27 (opposite the Zwinger palace complex) – Built 1911-1913
as "Neues Königliches Schauspielhaus" for the "Dresdner Theaterverein". Damaged
by bombs on 13/14 February 1945. Rebuilt 1946-1948. Re-opened 22 September 1948
as "Großes Haus des Staatstheater", home of the Staatstheater’s opera and drama
ensembles. After the completion of the Semperoper rebuilding in 1985, restored,
renamed to "Schauspielhaus" and subsequently used exlusively for drama
performances by the "Staatsschauspiel Dresden" company. Ca. 1990-1994 interior
renovations to the original 1913 plans. 909 seats

GERMANY – DRESDEN – SEMPER OPERA HOUSE –
Altstadt, Theaterplatz – First theatre on another site at the Theaterplatz
square: "Kleines Hoftheater" (built 1755 by Moretti, demolished 1841). First
theatre on the site: "Hoftheater" (built 1838-1841 by Gottfried Semper,
destroyed by a fire in 1869). Built 1871-1878 as "Altstädter Hoftheater –
Königliches Opernhaus". 1912-1914 alterations of interior decoration. 1919
renamed "Sächsische Staatsoper". 1938 renovation of the auditorium. Destroyed by
bombs in the night of 13/14 February 1945. 1945-1955 safety works, afterwards
left as a ruin until 1977. 1977-1985 rebuilding with slight alterations;
addition of modern extension buildings. August 2002 foyers and basement damaged
by flood. Original capacity: ca. 1800 persons, today: 1323 seats (+ 39
standing). Used for opera and ballet performances of the resident "Sächsische
Staatsoper" company

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
TANZ-KABARETT BARBERINA
– Altstadt, Prager Straße

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
TANZPALAST BLUMENSALE
– Blumenstraße 48

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
UFA-PALAST
Altstadt, Prager Straße 6 – Cinema, built 1970-1972 as "Filmtheater Prager
Straße" Also known as "Rundkino" [round cinema]. 1996-1998 extension by a
neighbouring new multiplex cinema by Coop Himmelb(l)au. Re-opened as
"UFA-Palast" complex. The complex includes 15 screens with 4700 seats. The
"Rundkino" building is also used for youth theatre performances

GERMANY – DRESDEN-
VARIETE DEUTSCHER KAISER

GERMANY – DUISBURG –

DEUTSCHE OPER AM RHEIN
– 1950

GERMANY – DRESDEN – FESTSPIELHAUS HELLERAU

GERMANY – DUISBURG-
STADTTHEATER
Neckarstraße 1 / König-Heinrich-Platz – Built 1911-1912 for the city of
Duisburg. Destroyed by bombs on 20 Dec 1942, with only the foyers and the
exterior walls surviving. 1945-1945 safety measures. 1950-1951 auditorium
rebuilding (with only two instead of the original four balconies). 1951-1952
reconstruction of the stagehouse. Since 1956, home to the "Deutsche Oper am
Rhein Düsseldorf/Duisburg" opera company (together with the Opernhaus
Düsseldorf). Re-opened 1956. 1983-1987 façade renovations and modernization of
the stage technology. Originally 1652 seats, today 1118 seats

GERMANY – DUISBURG-
STADTTHEATER RHEINHAUSEN

GERMANY – DUISBURG-
TONHALLE – Concert
hall, built in the late 1880s. Also used for theatre performances. Destroyed by
bombs in 1942 – 1962 a new concert and multi-functional hall "Mercatorhalle" was
opened on the site. Demolished 2003 in favour of a casino

GERMANY – DUREN –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – DUREN –
STADTTHEATER – OLD
Built 1905-07 – 700 seats. Destroyed by bombs on 16 November 1944

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF-
APOLLO-THEATER
Built 1898-1899 as a private theatre at the site of the demolished
"Bergisch-Märkischer Bahnhof" and "Köln-Mindener Bahnhof" train stations – 3000
seats – used for theatre, opera and operetta performances, and as a cinema.
1921-1925 home to the municipal theatre company. Major rebuilding in the 1930s.
From 1937 used as a cinema by the UFA circuit. Roof destroyed by bombs in 1942.
Re-opened 1950. Subsequently used for pop concerts, carnival balls, and
congresses. Closed 1959. Subsequently used as a TV studio. Demolished 1966 – In
1997, a new variety theatre at another site was opened as "Roncalli’s Apollo
Varieté"

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF – CAPITOL THEATRE –
Spring Awakening starts Mar 29/09;

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF –

DEUTSCHE OPER AM RHEIN
– 1956

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF-
LUSTSPIELHAUS
Opened 2 Sep 1907. 500 seats

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF-
OPERNHAUS
Heinrich-Heine-Allee 16a – Built 1873-1875 as "Stadttheater". 1891 extension and
electrification. 1906 major interior rebuilding. 1925 renamed "Opernhaus".
Auditorium completely destroyed by bombs 1943. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened
1944. Closed 1944. Re-opened 1945 with a concert. Re-opened as a theatre 1945.
Site of the first session of the "Landtag" parliament of the newly-formed state
Nordrhein-Westfalen l946. Rebuilt 1954-1956. Re-opened 1956 . Capacity:
originally 1410 seats, 1944: 1041 seats, today: 1342 seats. Since 1956, home to
the "Deutsche Oper am Rhein Düsseldorf/Duisburg" opera company (together with
the Stadttheater Dusiburg)

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF-
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD AND NEW
– Karl-Theodor-Strasse – Built 1904-1905. Operated as a private theatre. 1933
re-opened as municipal drama theatre. 1000 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1943 – NEW
– Gustav-Gründgens-Platz 1 (Hofgarten) – Built 1965-1970. The complex includes
two theatres: "Großes Haus" (968-1008 seats) and "Kleines Haus" (250-300 seats)

GERMANY – DUSSELDORF-
TONHALLE – OLD AND NEW
– Bought 1863 by the city of Düsseldorf. Home to the Düsseldorfer Orchester, the
second municipal orchestra in Germany. Destroyed by bombs in 1942 – 1975-1978
the former planetarium and multi-purpose hall "Rheinhalle" was converted to a
concert hall and renamed "Tonhalle"; NEW – Ehrenhof 1 – Built 1925-1926 as
"Rheinhalle", a planetarium and multi-purpose hall as a part of the "Ehrenhof"
complex of the Düsseldorf tradefair area (which was originally built for the
1926 "Gesolei – Gesundheitspflege, soziale Fürsorge und Leibesübungen"
exposition). Severly damaged in World War II. Re-opened 1954 as a multi-purpose
hall. 1975-1978 converted to a concert hall. Re-opened 1978 as "Tonhalle". Home
to the "Düsseldorfer Symphoniker" orchestra. 1933 seats; The "Grünes Gewölbe"
brick caves of the original Rheinhalle have survived all rebuildings. They are
currently used for art exhibitions by the Düsseldorf Kunstmuseum

GERMANY – EBERBACK/NECKAR-
KURHAUS

GERMANY – EBERSBACH/SACHSEN –
FREILICHTBUHNE
Open-air theatre

GERMANY – ECKERNFORDE-
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – EHRENFRIEDERSDORF-
FREILICHTBUHNE GREIFENSTEINE

GERMANY – EIBENSTOCK-
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – EISENACH-
THEATER EISENACH
Theaterplatz 7 – Built 1875-1878 as "Stadttheater" to the city of Eisenach.
Opened 1879. 1929 interior renovation. Damaged in World War II, subsequently
repaired. Re-opened 1945. 1952-1953 roof and stagehouse rebuilding and
modernization. 1977 major renovation. 1991 exterior renovation. Until 1992, used
for opera, ballet and drama performances and for concerts by the resident
companies. 1995-2003 one of the homes of the "Thüringer Landestheater" company
(with the opera and ballet companies located in Eisenach and the drama company
located in Rudolstadt, while all companies played in both cities and toured in
the region). Since 2003, used for opera and ballet performances and for concerts
by the resident companies, and used as a guest venue for drama performances by
the Meininger Theater company. 635 seats

GERMANY – EISENHUTTENSTADT-
FRIEDRICH-WOLF-THEATER
– Lindenallee – Built 1954-1955. Opened 1955. 1960 extension buildings for a
café and a library. Renovations 1973, 1980-1981, and 1998-2002. 738 seats

GERMANY – ELSPE-
KARL-MAY-FESTSPIELE

GERMANY – EMMERICH-
STADTTHEATER
Grollscher Weg – Opened 1968. Main theatre hall: 564 seats; foyer studio stage:
100 seats

GERMANY –

ENGLISH THEATRE IN GERMANY

GERMANY – ENZKLOSTERLE-
FESTHALLE

GERMANY – ERFURT –
ALETE OPER
Theaterstraße 1-2 (formerly: Dalbergsweg 28) – Built 1867 as "Sommertheater".
1877 purchased by "Konzert- und Theaterverein" [concert and theatre society].
Subsequently major rebuilding. Re-opened 1877. 1150 seats. Used by touring
theatre and opera companies – 1892 purchased by the city of Erfurt. 1893-1895
major rebuilding. Re-opened 1894 as "Stadttheater". 1025 seats. Used for opera,
drama, and ballet performances by resident companies. 1927-1928 extensions. 1933
renamed "Deutsches Volkstheater". 1945 re-renamed "Stadttheater". Subsequently
used for opera performances by the resident company. 1956 renamed "Opernhaus".
Subsequently used for opera and ballet performances by the resident companies.
1957-1958 and 1969 renovations. 832 seats. Closed 1997 due to safety concerns.
Subsequently restorations. Renamed "Alte Oper". Re-opened 2004. Used for drama
performances by touring companies, and for various shows and concerts

GERMANY – ERFURT –
KAISERSAAL
Futterstraße 15-16 – Built 1714 as "Ball-und Caffee-Haus" by converting a
brewery. Used as an university ballroom and theatre. Subsequently used for
theatre performances by touring companies (until 1868 also known as
"Stadttheater"). 1782 rebuilding and redecoration. 1808 redecoration by for the
"Congress of Erfurt", whose participants included Napoleon I. and the Czar
Alexander; 1822 major rebuilding. Re-opened 1822. 1831 extension by a
neighbouring house, facade rebuilding. 1847 redecoration. 1870 converted to a
concert hall and ballroom, renamed "Kaisersaal". 1891 site of the first major
national Social Democratic Party (SDP) convention. 1900 interior alterations.
1918-1938 used as a variety theatre and cinema. 1920 interior alterations. 1945
renamed "Erfurter Kongreßsäle". 1959 exterior renovation. Ca. 1965 renamed
"Kulturhaus des Büromschinenwerkes Optima Erfurt". Closed 1982 due to safety
concerns; 1991-1993 major renovation, interior restoration to the 1870 designs.
Re-opened 1994. Used for congresses, , various theatre performances and
concerts, balls, and various other events. The complex inlcudes the "Kaisersaal"
(up to 650 seats) and 6 function rooms

GERMANY – ERFURT –
VOGEL’S GARTEN
Variety theatre and concert garden

GERMANY – ERLANGEN –
MARKGRAFENTHEATER
Theaterplatz 2 – Built 1715-1718. Opened 1719. 1740-1743 major interior
rebuilding. Re-opened 1744. 1817 presented by King Ludwig I. of Bayern to the
local university. Since 1817 used as university theatre. 1838 purchased by the
city of Erlangen, renovated, and re-opened as "Stadttheater". 1876 renovations.
1892 auditorium renovation. In the mid-1890s modernization of stage technology,
extension by a decoration warehouse. 1903 electrification. 1958-1959 major
auditorium restoration to 1743 plans, rebuilding of foyers, staircases and the
exterior in modern style. Re-opened 1959. 1980-1981 stage rebuilding and
destruction of the last remains of the original stage technology. 1998-2003
major interior and exterior restoration. 561 seats (+ 48 standing). Currently
used for drama performances by the resident company, for guest performances by
touring companies, and by the festivals "StummFilmMusikTage",
"Hörkunstfestival", "PODIUM Freies Theater", and "Internationales
Figurentheaterfestival"

GERMANY – ESPELKAMP –
NEUES THEATER
Trakehner Straße – Built 1972 as a theatre and school events hall. Opened 1972.
2001-2002 renovations. 650 seats. Used as a guest venue for opera, operetta,
musical and drama performances by touring companies

GERMANY – ESSEN –
AALTO-THEATER

GERMANY – ESSEN –
COLOSSEUM – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – ESSEN – COLOSSEUM THEATER – Aida
2004

GERMANY – ESSEN –
GRILLO-THEATER

GERMANY – ESSEN –
KLEINKUNSTBUHNE

GERMANY – ESSEN –
LICHTBURG ESSEN
Kettwiger Straße 36 / Burgplatz – Cinema, opened 1928. Destroyed by bombs in
1943, leaving only the exterior walls. Ca. 1950 interior rebuilding to modern
plans and minor extensions. During the 1950s and 1960s, site of hundreds of
movie premieres and galas. Also used for theatre performances, cabaret, and jazz
concerts. 1999-2003 major renovation. Re-opened 2003. The complex includes two
halls: Lichtburg (1302 seats, the largest cinema in Germany), Atelier in der
Lichtburg (70 seats)

GERMANY – ESSEN –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS

GERMANY – ESSEN –
STADT. SAALBAU – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – EUTIN –
FREILICHTBUHNE IM SCHLOBPARK

GERMANY – FALKENBERG/ELSTER –
FREILICHTBUHNE FROHES LEBEN

GERMANY – FALKENHAIN –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY –

FESTIVALS

GERMANY – FISCHBACH –
BERGBUHNE

GERMANY – FLENSBURG –
DEUTSCHES HAUS

GERMANY – FLENSBURG –
SLESVIGHUS

GERMANY – FLENSBURG –
STADTTHEATER
Rathausstraße 22 – Built 1891-1894 for the city of Flensburg, replacing a
previous theatre (built 1795, demolished 1883). Opened 1894. 1924 extension by
an administrative wing and stagehouse modernization. 1933-1936 foyers and
auditorium rebuildings. In the 1930s/1940s also known as "Grenzlandtheater".
1986 façade renovation. 537 seats. One of the homes of the
"Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landestheater" opera, drama, and ballet companies

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
ALBERT-SCHUMANN-THEATER

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
ALTE OPER – war ruin

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – BOCKENHEIMER DEPOT

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
DIE SCHMIERE
Seckbächer Gasse 2 (Karmeliterkloster) – Used for cabaret performances by the
resident company (founded by Rudolf Rolfs in 1950)

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
FESTHALLE

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – FRANKFURT OPERA HOUSE
– 1880 – destroyed WWII – rebuilt 1951 – was home to the Frankfort Ballet – July
2004 – The Frankfurt Ballet has danced its last dance. The acclaimed
experimental company, which the American choreographer William Forsythe founded
in 1984 and has directed ever since, chose Paris for its final performance on
Saturday evening. Then, after many curtain calls and a few tears, the Frankfurt
Ballet ceased to exist – a new Forsythe Company should be born in January.
Unlike the Frankfurt Ballet, which worked from the Frankfurt opera house, the
Forsythe Company will have two homes, the Bockenheimer Depot in Frankfurt and
the Festspielhaus Hellerau in Dresden. With just 18 dancers and a smaller staff,
the Forsythe Company will be a slimmed down version of the Frankfurt Ballet,
which began with 42 classically trained dancers and had 34 when it was
disbanded. Of these 17 have found places in the new troupe. The new company also
plans to continue the Frankfurt Ballet’s practice of touring Europe and the
United States

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
HIPPODROM
Sachsenhausen, Kennedyallee / Stresemannallee – Built 1897 as a riding hall.
Also used for concerts, exhibitions and various festivals. 2000 seats. Destroyed
by bombs in World War II. Remains demolished in 1956; Later, an office block for
"Zentralverband der Elektrotechnik- und Elektroindustrie e. V." was built on the
site

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
JAHRHUNDERTHALLE HOCHST

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – 1782-1902

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – MAIN –
STADTISCHE BUHNEN – 1963

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – ODER –
KLEIST-THEATER

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – ODER –
KONZERTHALLE C.P.E. BACH

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – ODER –
LICHTSPIELTHEATER DER JUGEND
– Heilbronnerstraße – "Cinema of the Youth", built 1955. 1983 renovations.
Re-opened 1983. Closed 1998; 2004: plans to convert the building to a gambling
casino

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – ODER –
STADTTHEATER
Wilhelmsplatz (today: Platz der Republik) – Built 1840-1842. Later various
extensions. Originally 800 seats, later 609 seats. Destroyed by bombs in spring
1945

GERMANY – FRANKFURT – OLD OPERA HOUSE –
1880 – 2,500 seats

GERMANY – FRECHEN –
LINDEN-THEATER

GERMANY – FREIBERG (SACHSEN) –
STADTTHEATER
Buttermarkt – Originally built 1623 as a townhouse. Used as a theatre since
1790. 1791 extension by a neighbouring house. 1850 renovations. 1876-1885
extension and major exterior and interior rebuilding. 1896-1897 extension and
major exterior and interior rebuilding. 1907 extension. 1951 closed due to
structural problems. 1951-1952 renovations. Re-opened 1952. 1981 collapse of the
extension building in Borngasse, subsequently rebuilt. 1986-1991 extensions,
major renovations to the 1880 plans. 316 seats (+ 10 standing). One of the homes
of the "Mittelsächsisches Theater" drama and opera ensembles (together with the
Stadttheater at Döbeln)

GERMANY – FREIBURG IM BREISGAU –
FESTHALLE
Stadtgarten – Multi-purpose hall. Destroyed by bombs in 1944

GERMANY – FREIBURG IM BREISGAU –
KONZERTHAUS
Bismarckallee / Bertoldstraße / Sedanstraße – Concert hall and congress centre,
built 1992-1996. Opened June 1996. The complex comprises two halls, "Großer
Saal" (1744 seats) and "Runder Saal" (350 seats), and nine function rooms

GERMANY – FREIBURG IM BREISGAU –
STADTTHEATER
Werderring / Bertoldstraße 46 / Platz der Alten Synagoge (Theaterplatz) – Built
1905-1910. 1939 interior rebuilding, destroying most of the original decoration.
Destroyed by bombs in 1944, with only the exterior walls and parts of the
entrance hall remaining; 1949 rebuilding to modern designs. Installation of
cinemas and shops in the side wings. 1962 demolition of the original façade
gable. 1973 rebuilding. 1996-1998 major rebuilding. The complex comprises three
theatres: Großes Haus: Used for opera, drama and ballet performances by the
resident companies. 909 seats; Kleines Haus: Built as cinema "Theaterlichtspiele
Kurbel". Later renamed "Schauspielhaus Kurbel" and finally "Kleines Haus".
Mainly used for drama performances. 312 seats; Kammerbühne: Built as cinema
"Kamera". Later renamed "Kammerbühne". 99 seats

GERMANY – FREITAL –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – FREUDENSTADT –
KURSAAL

GERMANY – FREUDENSTADT –
KURHTHEATER

GERMANY – FREUDENSTADT –
POST-LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – FRIEDBERG (HESSEN) –
STADTHALLE – Am
Seebach 2 – The complex contains three halls (Saal 1: 480 seats, Saal 2: 420
seats, Saal 1/Saal 2 combined: up to 1114 seats, Saal 3: up to 180 seats),
various function rooms, a restaurant, and a hotel. Also known as
"Georg-August-Zinn-Halle". Used for drama and musical performances, concerts,
balls, congresses and various other events

GERMANY – FRIEDRICHSHAFEN –
GRAZ-ZEPPELIN-HAUS

GERMANY – FRIESACK –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – FURTH –
STADTTHEATER
Königstraße 116 / Hallplatz – Built 1901-1902 for the city of Fürth, using plans
they had originally designed for the Teatr im. Olgi Kobylyanskoy, Chernivtsi
(Ukraine) in 1900. The Chernivtsi project had been put on hold at the time. When
it was finally constructed in 1904-1905, the original designs were used. Hence,
the theatres at Chernivtsi and Fürth are very similar in appearance; Opened
1902. Originally used in co-operation with the Nürnberg theatre company.
1933-1944 used by a resident theatre company, notably for operetta performances.
After World War II, used as a military cinema by American troups. From 1952,
again used as a theatre in co-operation with the Nürnberg theatre company.
1971-1972 alterations of stagehouse and stage technology, interior renovation.
Subsequently used as a venue for touring companies and (from 1990) for
co-productions. Originally 1000 seats, today 707 seats

GERMANY – FUSSEN –
MUSICALTHEATER
NEUSCHWANSTEIN

GERMANY – GEISMAR –
KULTURHAUS F. GEYER
Friedensstraße 26 – Built 1949. First GDR Kulturhaus building in a rural area.
300 seats

GERMANY – GELSENKIRCHEN –
MUSIKTHEATER IM REVIER

GERMANY – GERA –
KULTUR-UND KONGRESSZENTRUM

GERMANY – GERA –
NEUE TONHALLE

GERMANY – GERA –
STADTTHEATER
Küchengartenallee 2 – Built 1900-1902 as "Fürstliches Hoftheater" for Erbprinz
Heinrich XXVII. Reuß j. L., funded by lottery funds and donations by the ducal
family, at the site of a previous theatre building (built in the 1820s, rebuilt
1870-1871, demolished ca. 1900). The complex includes a theatre (670 seats) and
a concert hall (960 seats). Opened 1902. 1918 renamed "Reußisches Theater". 1922
extension by a storage building. Closed 1944, re-opened Sep 1945 as
"Stadttheater". Stagehouse damaged by a fire in 1963, subsequently rebuilt and
modernized. 1977 installation of a new organ in the concert hall. Ca.. 1992
restoration of the concert hall. 2005-2007 major exterior and interior
restoration, and extension by a studio and rehearsal stage. Used as one of the
two main venues of the "Theater Altenburg Gera" opera and drama companies (see
also: Altenburg: Landestheater)

GERMANY – GERSDORF BEI HOHENSTEIN –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – GERSFELD –
KURTHEATER

GERMANY – GIEBEN –
KONGRESSHALLE

GERMANY – GIEBEN –
STADTTHEATER
Berliner Platz – Built 1906-1907. Opened 1907. Severely damaged by bombs in
1944. 1945 provisionally restored. 1951 renovation and alterations of auditorium
and foyers. 1979-1980 and 1998 renovations of the auditorium and foyers to the
original plans. Originally 802 seats (+ 31 standing), today 574 seats. Used for
opera and drama performances

GERMANY – GLAUCHAU –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – GLAUCHAU –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – GOPPINGEN –
STADTHALLE
Blumenstraße 41 – Multi-purpose hall, built 1953-1955. 1963 extension by an
office tract. 2003 renovation and modernization

GERMANY – GORLITZ –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – GORLITZ –
STADTTHEATER
Demianiplatz 2 – Built 1850-1851 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Görlitz.
Opened 1851. 620 seats. 1873 auditorium redecoration. 1882 extension by a foyer
tract and a stage extension. 1911 rebuilding and modernization, extension by a
foyer and box office hall. 1925-1926 restorations, auditorium extension (845
seats), other extensions and modernization (removing most of the original
exterior decoration). Later renamed "Gerhart-Hauptmann-Theater". 1963-1988 home
to the "Gerhart-Hauptmann-Theater" opera company (while the drama company
resided in the Zittau Gerhart-Hauptmann-Theater). 1967-1968 technical
modernization. 1992-2002 major exterior and interior restoration (auditorium
restoration to 1873 designs). Used for opera, drama and ballet performances by
the resident companies

GERMANY – GORLITZ –
WILHELM-THEATER
Built 1888-1889 on the site of a previous "Wilhelm-Theater" (former name:
"Theater im Kaiser-Garten") and a "Théâtre Varieté" (former names:
"Concert-Haus", "Zum Deutschen Kaiser"). Opened 1889. The complex included a big
theatre hall, "Kaisersaal" (ca. 2000 seats), several smaller rooms
("Feldherrnsaal" and others), and a theatre garden restaurant (ca. 3000 seats).
Used for theatre performances during the municipal theatre’s summer closure
time, amateur theatre performances, concerts, festive diner parties and balls –
Ca. 1911 re-opened as "Union-Theater" cinema and variety theatre (ca. 1000
seats). Since 1915, exclusively used as a cinema. 1936 extension by a cabaret
and variety theatre, "Scala". 1950-1951 interior rebuilding to modern designs.
Re-opened 1951 as "Karl-Marx-Klubhaus des VEB Waggonbau Görlitz" (also known as
"FDGB Kulturhaus"). Used for political conventions and balls. In the 1980s
interior restoration to the original designs. Closed 1989. In the 1990s again
used for theatre performances as "TAK (Theater am Karstadt"). 1991-1993
"Kaisersaal" used as office space by a bank, 1994-1999 used as a department
store. Despite strong protests demolished in 2001

GERMANY – GOSLAR –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – GOTHA –
EKHOF-THEATER
Schloß Friedenstein (south-western tower) – Built 1681-1683 as "Comödien- und
Ballhaus". Probably opened 1681. 1774 foundation of the first resident ducal
German drama company, under the direction of Conrad Ekhof who formed a company
heavily influential on the development of German drama. 1774-1775 auditorium
extension by a second balcony, auditorium redecoration. Re-opened 2 Oct 1775.
Closed in 1778. 1826-1827 auditorium redecoration in neoclassical style by
Italian artists. Subsequently again used as drama theatre. 1963-1968 technical
renovation to the original plans, auditorium renovation to the 1775 design.
Re-opened 1968 as "Ekhof-Theater". Subsequently mainly used as a museum and for
public lectures. 250 seats, only 176 of which can be used due to the closure of
the second balcony for structural reasons. Since the 1990s, restoration of the
original 1683 stage machinery that is still in use. Home to the
"Ekhof-Festival", an annual summer festival of 18th century opera and music

GERMANY – GOTHA –
LANDESTHEATER

GERMANY – GOTTINGEN-
AULA – Wilhelmsplatz
– University hall, built 1835-1837. Used for university lectures, functions, and
concerts. Also used for concerts during the annual "Internationale
Händel-Festspiele" festival

GERMANY – GOTTINGEN-
DEUTSCHES THEATER
Theaterplatz 11 – Built 1889-1890 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Göttingen.
Opened 1890. 1904 extension by storage rooms. 1927 extension by rehearsal rooms.
1936 foyer redecoration. 1950 renamed "Deutsches Theater". 1981-1984 major
renovations, extension by functional rooms, a studio stage and a foyer and café
wing. Originally 720 seats, today: 583 seats. Used for opera (until 1950) and
drama performances by the resident company. Occasionally also used for opera
performances during the annual "Internationale Händel-Festspiele" festival

GERMANY – GOTTINGEN-
STADTHALLE
Albaniplatz 2 – Multi-purpose hall, built 1961-1964 for the city of Göttingen.
Opened 1964. Ca. 2000 renovations. Used for classical and popular concerts, and
various other events. Also used for opera performances and concerts during the
annual "Internationale Händel-Festspiele" festival

GERMANY – GOTTINGEN-
THEATER
Wilhelmsplatz – Built 1820-1824 as ballroom and concert restaurant
"Restauration". 1834 south wing converted to a theatre. Theatre destroyed by
fire 1887; 1895 converted to a restaurant ("Kaiserhallen"). Since 1922, used as
a student cafeteria ("Mensa")

GERMANY – GREIFSWALD-
THEATER

GERMANY – GROBKOCHBERG-
LIEBHABERTHEATER
Kochberg palace park – "Amateur Theatre", built 1796-1799, by converting a
garden house. Originally used for amateur drama productions. Also known as
"Goethetheater". 1975 major renovation to the original plans. Currently used for
theatre performances, concerts, and recitals

GERMANY – GUBEN-
LICHTSPIELTHEATER
FRIEDENSGRENZE
– Karl-Marx-Straße 56 – Cinema, built 1956 by G. Graper.
Opened 1956. Closed ca. 1990-2000

GERMANY – GUSTROW-
ERNST-BARLACH-THEATER

GERMANY – GUSTROW-
SCHAUBURG-LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – GUSTROW-
ERNST-BARLACH-THEATER

GERMANY – GUTERSLOH-
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – HAGEN –
FREILICHTBUHNE HOHENLIMBURG

GERMANY – HAGEN –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – HALBERSTADT –
STADTTHEATER – Built
1905. Originally used for drama performances, since 1919 used for opera and
drama performances. Destroyed by bombs 1945

GERMANY – HALBERSTADT –
VOLKSTHEATER – Straße
der Opfer des Faschismus 38 – Built 1891 as "Gesellschaftshaus Elysium".
1947-1949 major rebuilding and conversion to a theatre for the city of
Halberstadt. Re-opened 1949 as "Volkstheater". 500 seats. Since 1992, one of the
homes of the "Nordharzer Städtebundtheater Halberstadt/Quedlinburg" opera,
ballet, and drama companies

GERMANY – HALFING –
GUT IMMLING

GERMANY – HALLE – SAALE –
FREYLINGHAUSEN-SAAL
Franckesche Stiftungen – Haus 1, Franckeplatz 1 – 1710-1711 built as "Großer
Versammlungssaal" (Great Meeting Hall) within the "Franckesche Stiftungen" (a
social and educational institution founded by August Hermann Francke). 1995
restaurations. Used for concerts, lectures and other events

GERMANY – HALLE – SAALE –
G.-F.-HANDEL-HALLE
Salzgrafenplatz 1 – Built 1996-1998. Opened 1998. The complex includes two
halls, "Großer Saal" (1500 seats) and "Kleiner Saal" (350 seats). Used for
musical theatre performances by touring companies, classical and pop concerts,
congresses, and various festivities

GERMANY – HALLE – SAALE –
OPERNHAUS

GERMANY – HALLE – STADT THEATRE – 1951

GERMANY – HALLE – SAALE –
STEINTOR-VARIETE – Am
Steintor 10 – Built 1867 by Suvern as a hippodrome. 1868 converted to a
ballroom. Rebuilt 1888-1889 as a theatre. Opened 1 Feb 1889 as
"Walhalla-Theater". Used as a variety theatre and for operetta performances.
1909 restorations, installation of an iron curtain. 1920 major exterior and
interior rebuilding (new façade, interior adapted for cinema use). Since 1922,
again used as variety theatre. Closed 1934. Re-opened 1943 as
"Steintor-Varieté". Closed 1944, re-opened 1945. 1955 re-conversion to a theatre
proper. Since 1968, used for concerts by the "Hallesche Philharmonie" orchestra.
1989 interior alterations. 924 seats. Currently operated as a private variety
theatre. Used for variety, revue, musical, cabaret performances and for concerts

GERMANY – HALLE – THEATRE DES FRIEDENS –
destroyed 1945

GERMANY – HALLENBERG –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
BALLHAUS ALKAZAR
Sankt Pauli, Reeperbahn 110-114 – Ballroom and cabaret

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
CARL-SCHULTZE-THEATER

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
CONGRESS-CENTRUM CCH

GERMANY – HAMBURG – DEUTSCHES
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – Sankt Georg, Kirchenallee – Built 1899-1900 for the
"Aktiengesellschaft Deutsches Schauspielhaus". The auditorium is an enlarged
copy of the Volkstheater Wien by the same architects. Opened 1900. 1913
conversion of the 1st balcony foyers into the art deco "Marmorsaal". 1934 put
under state control and renamed "Staatliches Schauspielhaus". 1934
modernizations and alterations of interior colour scheme. 1944 used as a cinema.
Damaged in World War II. Re-opened 1948. 1957-1962 restorations and alterations.
1971 opening of a the studio stage "Malersaal". 1981-1984 modernization of stage
technology, addition of an administrative and technical building with a parking
garage, major restoration of auditorium and foyers to the original plans.
Capacity: originally 1831 seats, today 1397 seats

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
EDEN-THEATER

GERMANY – HAMBURG – Elbe Philharmonic
Concert Hall – to be built on top of old coffee warehouse

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
FREILICHTBUHNE IM STADTPARK

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
GESELLSCHAFTSHAUS KURSAAL

GERMANY – HAMBURG – HAMBURG KAMMERSPIELE –
originally built 1907 as Volksschauspielhaus – reconstructed and reopened 1918

GERMANY – HAMBURG –

HAMBURGISCHE STAATSOPER

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
HANSA-THEATER – Sankt
Georg, Steindamm 17 – Variety theatre, built 1894. 1500 seats. Destroyed by
bombs in 1943. 1945 rebuilding. 1953 rebuilding (491 seats). Closed 2001

GERMANY – HAMBURG – HERZOG & deMEURON’S
ELBPHILHARMONIE – Under construction 2009

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
KASPERLTHEATER
SPIELBUDENPLATZ

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
KLEINE KOMODIE

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
MOULIN ROUGE

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
MUSICAL-THEATER

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
MUSIK-HALLE

GERMANY – HAMBURG – NATIONAL THEATRE – 1767
– closed 1769

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
NEUE FLORA THEATER
Dance of the Vampires 2004

GERMANY – HAMBURG – NEUES THEATER – 1920s

GERMANY – HAMBURG – NEW OPERA HOUSE – built
1955 to replace one bombed during WWII

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
OPERETTENHAUS – Mamma
Mia (November 2002)

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
RENDEZVOUS

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
ST.-PAULI-THEATER

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
SCHAUBURG ST. PAULI

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
STAATSOPER

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – HAMBURG – STADT THEATRE – ALTONA
– built 1874

GERMANY – HAMBURG – THALIATHEATER – 1843 –
reconstructed 1950

GERMANY – HAMBURG – THEATER – built 1678 in
Gansemark

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
THEATER – HAUS IM PARK
– Bergedorf, Gräpelweg 8 – Operated by the private "Körber-Stiftung" foundation
(formerly "Hauni-Stiftung"). Used as a guest venue by touring companies

GERMANY – HAMBURG – THEATER NEVE FLORA –
Tarzan – Oct 2008;

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
TIERPARK HAGENBECK:
SIAMESICHES THEATER
– Part of the "Völkerschau Siamesen-Dorf " by
Tierpark Hagenbeck, an exhibition presenting Thai village life

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
TONHALLE A. HEIDEN

GERMANY – HAMBURG –
WILHELMSHALLE

GERMANY – HAMELN –
THEATER HAMELN
Rathausplatz 5 – Built 1951-1952 as "Weserbergland-Festhalle". 1990-1991
rebuilding. The complex originally included two halls, "Großes Haus" and
"Kleines Haus": Großes Haus: Opened 1953. Also known as "Theater". 1993 renamed
"Theater Hameln". 687 seats. Mainly used as a guest venue for opera and drama
performances by touring companies. Occasionally also used for drama productions
by the Theater Hameln company. Also used for concerts by Staatsorchester
Braunschweig and for various other events; Kleines Haus: Demolished 1996 in
favour of the congress centre "Weserbergland-Zentrum"

GERMANY – HAMM –
KURHAUS BAD HAMM

GERMANY – HANAU –
COMOEDIENHAUS WILHELMSBAD
– Wilhelmsbad, Parkpromenade 1 – Built 1781 for Prince Wilhelm von Hessen-Kassel
(the future Prince Elector Wilhelm I.) Opened 1781. Closed 1785 after the
prince’s departure from Hanau to Kassel. Briefly revived as a theatre for
seasons in 1852 and 1861. After 1945 used as a warehouse. 1968 restored.
Currently used for theatre performances and concerts throughout the year. Also
used for performances by the "Hanauer Kultursommers", "Wilhelmsbader
Sommernacht" and "Wilhelmsbader Kinderkulturfest" summer festivals. 195 seats

GERMANY – HANAU –
STADTHALLE
Schloßplatz 1 – Built 1928 as a multi-purpose hall by converting the "Marstall"
[stables] of the Stadtschloß palace. Destroyed by bombs 1945. 1949-1950
rebuilding for use as a multi-purpose hall and as a theatre. 1965-1966 major
rebuilding and extension. Used for theatre performances, concerts and
congresses. Closed 2001 for major rebuilding and extension. 2003 re-opened as
part of the "Congress Park Hanau"

GERMANY – HANAU –
STADTTHEATER
Freiheitsplaz (formerly: Paradeplatz) – Built 1768 by Franz Ludwig Cancrin for
Prince Wilhelm von Hanau. 1904 rebuilding. Destroyed in World War II

GERMANY – HANN. MUNDEN –
FREILICHTBUHNE TANNENKAMP

GERMANY – HANOVER –
BALLHOF

GERMANY – HANOVER –
CORSO-KUNSTLERSPIELE

GERMANY – HANOVER –
HECKENTHEATER HERRENHAUSEN
– Park Herrenhausen – Open-air garden hedge theatre, built 1689-1692. 1892
installation of a back wall, "Kleine Kaskade". Ca. 1000 seats. Used for theatre
performances by the Landesbühne Hannover company and by the Festwochen
Herrenhausen summer festival

GERMANY – HANOVER – HOUSE OF THEATER – 1853
– destroyed WWII

GERMANY – HANOVER – LANDSTHEATER – 1950

GERMANY – HANOVER –
MELLINI-THEATER
Artilleriestraße – Built 1910 as a variety and operetta theatre. 1677 seats. Ca.
1933-1945 part of the Nazi "Kraft durch Freude" programme

GERMANY – HANOVER –
METROPOLTHEATER

GERMANY – HANOVER – OPERA HOUSE –
Opernplatz / Georgstraße – Built 1845-1852 as "Königliches Hoftheater" for King
Ernst August of Hannover. Painted curtain (originally installed at the "Großes
Schloßtheater" in 1789). Opened 1852. Originally, the complex included the main
stage and a concert hall. 1894-1895 conversion of the concert hall into a
rehearsal stage, foyer alterations. 1904 security improvements. 1927 conversion
of rehearsal stage into a theatre museum. Destroyed by bombs 1943, leaving only
exterior walls and the parterre foyers. 1949-1950 exterior restored to the
original designs, interior rebuilt to modern designs (only stalls and 1st
balcony finished). Re-opened 1950. Subsequently auditorium extensions by a 2nd
and 3rd balcony. 1983-1985 major interior rebuilding. Originally 1600, 1940:
1700 seats, 1950: 1084 seats, 1959: 1575 seats, after 1985: 1207 seats. As a
part of "Niedersächsische Staatstheater Hannover", used for opera and ballet
performances by the resident companies

GERMANY – HANOVER –
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD
– Hildesheimer Straße 229 / Adelheidstraße – Built 1910-1911 as "Schauburg" as a
private theatre for the "Hannoversche Schauspielhaus-Gesellschaft m.b.H.".
Opened 1911. Originally used as a drama theatre, after a bankruptcy in 1912
mainly used for operetta and comedy performances. 1923 rented by the city of
Hannover. Subsequently used for drama performances by the municipal theatre
company. 1925 bought by the city of Hannover. 1926 renamed "Schauspielhaus". 990
seats. Completely destroyed by bombs in 1943

GERMANY – HANOVER –
STADTHALLE
Theodor-Heuss-Platz 1-3 / Stadtpark – Multi-purpose hall, built 1911-1914.
Opened 1914. The complex includes two main halls: "Kuppelsaal" (3642 seats) and
"Beethovensaal" (753 seats). Currently part of the "Hannover Congress Centrum
HCC". Used as a congress centre, for concerts, and for various other events

GERMANY – HANOVER – STADT THEATRE 1877 –
destroyed WWII – replaced by present theatre built 1950

GERMANY – HANOVER –
THEATER AM AEGI
Aegidientorplatz – Built 1953 as cinema and variety theatre. Named after the
nickname of the location, the "Aegidientorplatz" square. Also used for drama and
operetta performances by Thalia-Theater and Landesbühne Hannover. Destroyed by a
fire in 1964. Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1967 as drama theatre. 1978
rebuilding of façade. Since 1994, operated as a private theatre. Used as a guest
venue for opera, operetta, musical, ballet, drama, variety, and cabaret
performances. Also used for concerts and small congresses. 1168 seats

GERMANY – HANOVER –
VEREINIGTE
THEATER-LICHTSPIELE
– cinema

GERMANY – HAYINGEN –
NATURTHEATER

GERMANY – HEIDE –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – HEIDELBERG –
AULA DER ALTEN UNIVERSITAT

GERMANY – HEIDELBERG –
STADTHALLE
Neckarstaden – Built 1903. Originally used for concerts and balls. 1980
renovated and re-opened as a congress centre. Currently used for congresses,
classical concerts, balls, and various other events

GERMANY – HEIDELBERG –
THINGSTATTE

GERMANY – HEIDENHEIM –
KONZERTHAUS

GERMANY – HEIDENHEIM –
NATURTHEATER

GERMANY – HEILBRONN –
HARMONIE – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – HEILBRONN –
STADTTHEATER – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – HELGOLAND-
KURTHEATER

GERMANY – HELMSTEDT –
BRUNNENTHEATER
Brunnental, Brunnenweg 7 – Built 1925-1927, replacing a previous summer theatre
(built 1815, closed in the 1920s, subsequently moved to Lämmerschenburg and used
as a farm shed). Also known as "Kurtheater". Various renovations 1955, 1976-1980
and 1984/1985. 615 seats. Used as a guest venue for opera and drama performances
by touring companies

GERMANY – HENNIGSDORF –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – HERDORF –
HUTTENHAUS
Buchenhang / Wolfsweg – Built 1953-1954 for the "Friedrichshütte" steel works.
Opened 1954. 1968 bought by the city of Herdorf. Used for opera, musical
theatre, and drama performances, as well as for concerts and balls. 430 seats

GERMANY – HEILBRONN –
HARMONIE – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – HERFORD –
STADTTHEATER
Mindener Straße 11 / Hansastraße / Bruchstraße – Built 1961. 692 seats. Used as
a guest venue for opera, operetta, musical and drama performances by touring
companies. Also used for classical and popular concerts

GERMANY – HERINGSDORF –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – HETTSTEDT –
KLUBHAUS

GERMANY – HILDBURCHAUSEN –
THEATER

GERMANY – HILDESHEIM –
STADTTHEATER
Theaterstraße 6 – Built 1908-1909 as a private theatre, on the site of a
previoius theatre hall ("Knaub’sches Etablissement") and partly using existing
buildings. Opened 1909. From 1922, operated as municipal theatre by the city of
Hildesheim. Closed 1944. Completely destroyed by bombs 1945 (with only the
exterior walls and the façade remaining). Rebuilt 1947-1949. Re-opened 1949.
1997 renovations. Used by the resident opera and drama companies. Originally 800
seats, today 673 seats

GERMANY – HINTERZARTEN –
KURHAUS

GERMANY – HOF –
STADTTHEATER – OLD

GERMANY – HOHENSTEIN-ERNSTTHAL –
KREISKULTURHAUS

GERMANY – HOYERSWERDA –
LAUSITZHALLE

GERMANY – IDAR-OBERSTEIN –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – ILMENAU –
STADTISCHE FESTHALLE

GERMANY – INGOLSTADT –
STADTTHEATER – OLD AND NEW
– Rathausplatz (Hauptwachplatz) – Built 1873-1874, replacing a slaughterhouse.
1929-1930 major rebuilding and extension. Destroyed by bombs 1944; NEW –
Schloßlände 1 – Built 1962-1966, for the city of Ingolstadt. Opened 1966. The
complex contains two theatres, a multi-purpose hall, exhibition rooms, and a
restaurant: Großes Haus: 663 seats. Used for drama performances by the resident
company, and as a guest venue for opera and musical performances by touring
companies; Werkstattbühne: Studio theatre with 99 seats. Used for drama
performances by the resident company; Festsaal der Stadt: Multi-purpose hall.
Used for concerts, balls, corporate events and other events. Up to 1300 seats

GERMANY – ISERLOHN –
PARKTHEATER

GERMANY – ITZEHOE-
THEATER
Theodor-Heuss-Platz 1 – Built 1989-1992. Used as a guest venue for opera,
musical, drama, and other performances by touring companies.Also used for
classical and popular concerts

GERMANY – JENA-
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – JENA-
VOLKSHAUS

GERMANY – JOHANNGEORGENSTADT-
KULTURHAUS KARL MARX

GERMANY – JONSDORF-
WALDBUHNE

GERMANY – KAISERSLAUTERN-
FRUCHTHALLE

GERMANY – KAISERSLAUTERN-
FRUCHTHALLE

GERMANY – KAISERSLAUTERN-
PFALZTHEATER – OLD AND NEW
– Fackelrondell – Built 1928 as "Protestantisches Vereinshaus". In the 1930,
converted to a café and cinema ("Filmpalast"). 1950-1995 home to the
"Pfalztheater" opera and drama companies. Demolished 1995 after the opening of
the new "Pfalztheater"; NEW – Willy-Brandt-Platz 4-5 / Burgstraße / Lutherstraße
– Built 1995 for Bezirksverband Pfalz. Opened 1995 . Used for opera, drama and
ballet performances by the resident companies. Main theatre ("Großes Haus"): 730
seats, studio theatre ("Werkstattbühne"): 200 seats

GERMANY – KAISERSLAUTERN-
UNIVERSUM
Kaiserslautern – Cinema, built 1956.

GERMANY – KAMENZ-
THINGPLATZ

GERMANY – KARLSRUHE – home of BADEN STAATS
OPERA – in rebuilt Grosses Haus Theatre built there 1806-8 – theatre burned down
1847 – Hof Theatre built 1851-3 – destroyed WWII

GERMANY – KARLSRUHE –
BADISCHES STAATSTHEATER –
OLD AND NEW
– Schloßplatz – 1st theatre on the site built 1806-1808 as
"Großherzogliches Hoftheater", replacing an "Orangerie" building. Opened 1808.
Destroyed by fire on 28 Feb 1847, killing 64 members of the audience. Built
1849-1853 as "Großherzogliches Hoftheater". Opened 1853. 1918 renamed "Badisches
Landestheater". 1933 renamed "Badisches Staatstheater". Originally ca. 2000
seats, later 1553 seats. Used for opera, drama and ballet performances by the
resident companies. Destroyed by bombs 1944. Remains subsequently demolished. In
1945, the resident companies moved to the Konzerthaus. In 1950, the drama
company moved to the Stadthalle. After plans to build a new theatre on the site,
it was eventually decided to build the "Bundesverfassungsgericht" (Federal
Supreme Court) there. 1970-1975, a new "Badisches Staatstheater" was built on
another site in Baumeisterstraße; NEW – Baumeisterstr. 11 / Ettlinger Tor –
Built 1970-1975 by Helmut Bätzner. The complex contains two halls: Großes Haus:
Opened 1975 with Mozart’s "Die Zauberflöte". 1002 seats. Kleines Haus: Opened
1975 with Peter Hack’s "Der Frieden" (after Aristophanes). 350-550 seats. Used
for opera, drama and ballet performances by the resident companies. Home to the
annual "Händel-Festspiele Karlsruhe" festival

GERMANY – KARLSRUHE –
FESTHALLE – Stadtgarten
/ Festplatz – Multi-purpose hall, built 1875-1877. Destroyed by bombs in World
War II. 1953-1954 the multi-purpose hall "Schwarzwaldhalle" was built on the
site.

GERMANY – KARLSRUHE –
KONZERTHAUS – Festplatz
– Concert hall, built 1915. After 1918, used as a second theatre by the
"Badisches Landestheater" companies. In the 1920s, used for summer seasons of
operetta performances. During World War II, renamed "Capitol-Lichtspiele" and
used as a cinema. Severely damaged in World War II (inlcuding complete
destruction of the façade and portico). Subsequently repaired (without the
portico). 1945-1975 used for opera and ballet performances by the resident
"Badisches Staatstheater" companies (1945-1950 also used for drama
performances). 1953 major interior rebuilding as a theatre. Re-opened 1953. 1964
installation of a studio stage, opened 15 Feb. Closed as a theatre 1975.
1992-1994 major exterior and interior renovations, reconstruction of the portico
and re-conversion to a concert hall. Main hall: up to 1045 seats, small hall: up
to 200 seats. Used for concerts and congresses

GERMANY – KARLSRUHE –
STADTHALLE – Festplatz –
Multi-purpose hall, built 1915. 1950 installation of a theatre
("Schauspielhaus") in the right wing, opened 1950. Used 1950-1975 for drama
performances by the resident "Badisches Staatstheater" company. 1979-1985 major
rebuilding and extension. The building includes 8 halls (including the concert
hall "Brahms-Saal") and 20 function rooms. Used for classical concerts,
congresses and various other events

GERMANY – KASSEL –
HOFTHEATER – 1766

GERMANY – KASSEL –
KAISER-SALE

GERMANY – KASSEL –
OTTONEUM

GERMANY – KASSEL – STAATS THEATRE – 1959 –
replacing original 1909 destroyed during WWII

GERMANY – KASSEL-
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – KIEL-
OPERNHAUS – Rathausmarkt
– Built 1905-1907 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Kiel. Opened 1907. 1943-1944
destroyed by bombs, with only the exterior walls surviving. 1952-1953 rebuilding
to modern designs. Used for opera performances by the resident company. 960
seats

GERMANY – KIEL-
OSTSEEHALLE

GERMANY – KIEL-
REICHSHALLEN

GERMANY – KIEL – STADTHEATER – 1953

GERMANY – KLEVE –
STADTHALLE – Lohstätte 4
– Used as a touring venue for drama performances, for concerts and for various
other events. 700 seats

GERMANY – KOBLENZ-
FESTHALLE

GERMANY – KOBLENZ-
RHEIN-MOSEL-HALLE

GERMANY – KOBLENZ-
SOMMERSPIELE

GERMANY – KOBLENZ-
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – KOBLENZ-
THINGSTATTE – in front
of the Schloss – Open-air theatre, built 1935 as a "Thingstätte" for Nazi
performances. Destroyed by bombs in 1944

GERMANY – KOLN-
BURGHOF-VARIETE

GERMANY – KOLN-
CINEDOM

GERMANY – KOLN-
GURZENICH – Martinstraße
– Built 1441-1447 as a municipal dance hall and department store. The festival
hall located on the upper floor was used for municipal festivites and functions,
the ground floor was used as a department store. In the 17th century, the whole
building was only used as a department store. From ca. 1820 revival of the
building as a festival and concert venue. Since then also used for carnival
balls. From 1857 to 1986 home to the Gürzenich-Orchester. Extensions in the 19th
century. Ground floor used by the local Stock Exchange. Destroyed in 1943, with
only the exterior walls remaining. Rebuilt in modern style within the existing
walls from 1948. 1996-1997 renovations and modernization, conversion into a
congress centre. Currently mainly used for congresses, exhibitions, concerts,
and carnival balls. The building includes two halls: Großer Saal (1101 seats)
and Isabellensaal (234 seats)

GERMANY – KOLN-
KAMMERSPIELHAUS – Köln –
Built 1901 as "Residenz-Theater". Opened 1901. Ca. 1910 renamed "Deutsches
Theater". Ca 1920 renamed "Kammerspielhaus". 850 seats

GERMANY – KOLN-
KOLNARENA

GERMANY – KOLN-
KUNSTLERSPIELE
SIMPLICISSIMUS
– Hohe Straße 152-154 – cabaret

GERMANY – KOLN-
MARIONETTENTHEATER
Puppet theatre on the "Pressa" tradefair grounds

GERMANY – KOLN-
OPERNHAUS – OLD AND NEW
– Habsburgerring 9 / Rudolfplatz / Aachener Straße – Built 1899-1902 as "Neues
Stadttheater". Opened 7 September 1902. From 1906, exclusively used for opera
performances. 1934 rebuilding of the theatre restaurant. 1937-1940 major
auditorium rebuilding. Originally 1806 seats, in 1940: 1746 seats. Severely
damaged by bombs 1944. Plans to rebuild the theatre were cancelled in the 1950s
when the city council decided to build a new Opernhaus at another site. Remains
demolished in 1958; NEW – Offenbachplatz – Built 1954-1957. Opened 1957. Used
for opera and ballet performances. 1346 seats. ["Yakult Halle", a movable
theatre in the upper foyer of the opera house, is used for performances of
children’s operas

GERMANY – KOLN-
PHILHARMONIE
Bischofsgartenstraße 1 – Concert hall, built 1982-1986 for the city of Köln, as
a part of the "Museum Ludwig/Philharmonie" complex. Opened 1986. Home to the
Gürzenich-Orchester Köln and the RSO Köln. 2200 seats

GERMANY – KOLN-
REICHSHALLEN-THEATER
Built 1875 by Nagelschmidt. 2000 seats

GERMANY – KOLN-
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD AND NEW
– Glockengasse 17-23 / Kreuzgasse – Built 1869-1872 as "Stadttheater" for
"Stadtkölnischer Theater-Aktienverein". Opened 1872. 1906 renamed
"Schauspielhaus"; subsequently mainly used for drama performances. 1938-1940
modernization of stage technology, auditorium renovation. Originally 1378 seats
(+ 422 standing), later 1250 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1943. Remains demolished
in the early 1950s; NEW – Offenbachplatz / Brüderstraße, next to the Opernhaus –
Built 1960-1962. Opened 1962. Used for drama performances. 918 seats.
"West-End-Theater" is a theatre located in the upper foyer of the Schauspielhaus

GERMANY – KOLN-
THEATER KAISERHOF

GERMANY – KONIGS WUSTERHAUSEN-
CAPITOL

GERMANY – KONSTANZ-
KONZIL

GERMANY – KONSTANZ-
STADTTHEATER
Konzilstraße 11 / Theatergasse – Built 1609 as a Jesuite school, including a
school theatre. 1934-1935 major exterior and interior rebuilding. 1973 major
renovations. 2003 roof rebuilding. Used for drama performances by the resident
company. Ca. 400 seats

GERMANY – KOTNWESTHEIM-
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – KOTHEN-
SPIEGELSAAL IM SCHLOB

GERMANY – KOTHEN-
THEATER KOTHEN

GERMANY – KOTHEN-
TIVOLI-THEATER

GERMANY – KREFELD-
SEIDENFADEN-VARIETE

GERMANY – KREFELD-
STADTTHEATER – OLD-INTERIM
AND NEW

GERMANY – KYRITZ-
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – LANDAU –
CORONA-THEATER

GERMANY – LANDAU –
FESTHALLE – Built
1905-1907. Auditorium alterations in the 1970s. Ca. 2000-2002 renovation to the
original designs. Re-opened 2002. The complex includes a great hall (capacity:
up to 1000 persons), a small hall (capacity: 150 persons) and various function
rooms

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
ALTES THEATER
Richard-Wagner-Platz (formerly: Rannische Bastei) – Built 1766 (1186 seats).
Opened 1766. 1796 rebuilding of stagehouse. 1802 stage extension. 1817 major
exterior and auditorium rebuilding after designs by Friedrich Weinbrenner.
Re-opened 1817 as "Theater der Stadt Leipzig". 1826 new painted interior
decoration. 1829-1832 operated as Saxon court theatre. From 1833, again operated
by private theatre managers. 1868 renamed "Altes Theater". Subsequently mainly
used for drama performances. From 1912, operated as a municipal theatre by the
city of Leipzig. Ca. 1920 major stagehouse rebuilding. 1224 seats. Destroyed by
bombs 1943. Remains later demolished

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
CAPITOL

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
CAROLA-THEATER

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
CENTRAL-THEATER
Bosestraße 1 – Built 1901. Destroyed by bombs in World War II. 1955-1956, the
new "Schauspielhaus" was built on the site, incorporating the remains of the
Central-Theater

GERMANY – LEIPZIG – DIE PFEFFERMUHLE (PEPPER
MILL)

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
GEWANDHAUS – 1781-1884-1981
– Universitätsstraße 16 / Kupfergäßchen / Neumarkt / Gewandgäßchen – Originally
built 1498 as municipal armory ("Zeughaus"). 1st floor used as exhibition house
for cloth makers ("Gewandhaus"). 1780-1781 installation of a concert hall in the
2nd floor. Opened 1781 with a concert by the orchestra "Das Große Conzert",
later known as "Gewandhaus-Orchester". 1823 renovations. 1831 interior
rebuilding and extension. 1842 major extension. 1872 renovations. Since the
opening of the new "Konzerthaus" (also known as "Gewandhaus") in 1884, also
known as "Altes Gewandhaus". 1781-1884 home to the "Gewandhaus-Orchester", used
for a subscription concert series and for guest concerts. 1884-1886 only
occasionally used for concerts. Original capacity: ca. 500 persons, after 1842:
ca. 1000 persons. 1893-1901 concert hall demolished while the building was
included in the new "Städtisches Kaufhaus" exhibition house complex (1897
opening of a new concert hall wihtin the "Städtisches Kaufhaus" complex);
Grassistraße 5 / Beethovenstraße – Built 1882-1884 as "Neues Konzerthaus".
Opened 11 Dec 1884. The complex included a large concert hall (1700 seats) and a
chamber concert hall (650 seats). Home to the Gewandhaus-Orchester (that had
previously played in the first Gewandhaus, built 1781 at another site). Relating
to the orchestra’s traditional home, the new concert hall was also widely known
as "Neues Gewandhaus". Severely damaged by bombs 1943 and 1944. Despite plans to
reconstruct the building, the remains were demolished on 29 Mar 1968; After
1968, the site was used as a park and as a parking lot. In 2002, a university
building was built on the site; From Sep 1944 to April 1945, the
Gewandhaus-Orchester played in the cinema "Capitol". From 1946, the
"Kongreßhalle" served as a provisional home to the Gewandhaus-Orchester, until
the new "Gewandhaus" (the third building of this name) at Augustusplatz was
opened in 1981. Augustusplatz (formerly: Karl-Marx-Platz) – Built 1977-1981 on
the former site of the "Museum der Bildenden Künste". Named in reference to the
first home of the orchestra, the Gewandhaus (1781), formerly an exhibition house
for cloth makers. Opened 1981. Used for symphonic concerts, chamber recitals,
and congresses. Home to the Gewandhaus-Orchester

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
KLEINES THEATER

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
KONGREBHALLE – Built
1898-1900 by Heinrich Rust for the Leipzig Zoo society. Opened 1900. The complex
included several halls and function rooms: "Großer Saal", "Weißer Saal",
"Richard-Wagner-Saal", "Bachsaal", "Goethezimmer", "Lessing-Saal",
"Leibnizsaal", "Lortzing-Saal", "Mendelssohn-Bartholdy-Zimmer", and
"Basteizimmer". During World War I, used as a military hospital. 1946
rebuilding. Re-opened 1946 with a concert by the Gewand-Orchester. 1946-1981
home to the Gewandhaus-Orchester, until the new "Gewandhaus" (the third building
of this name) at Augustusplatz was opened. 1946-1998 home to the fist German
children’s theatre, "Theater der Jungen Welt" (at "Weißer Saal"). 1947 major
interior rebuilding. Subsequently used as a multi-purpose hall for all kinds of
entertainment and sport events. From 1978, home to the "Leipziger Jazztage" jazz
festival. Closed due to safety problems in 1988 (except the "Weißer Saal").
Stagehouse destroyed by a fire 1989. Subsequently the whole complex was closed.
Since 1998, safety works and renovations

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
KONSERVATORIUM

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
KRYSTALLPALAST
(0LD)/ALBERTHALLE
– Wintergartenstraße – First entertainment venue on the
site: "Wintergarten" built in the early 19th century, including ballrooms,
cafés, restaurants and a casino. Closed 1838. Rebuilt and re-opened 1870 as
"Wintergarten", also known as "Pleasure Gardens". Destroyed by fire in 1881.
Krystallpalast: Variety theatre and restaurant complex, built 1882. The complex
included theatre halls, various restaurants and ballrooms, a sakting rink, and
various other rooms. 1892 extension by a winter garden hall. Destroyed by bombs
1943. Alberthalle: Circus hall, built 1887 as an extension to the Krystallpalast
complex. Opened 1887. 3000 seats. Since 1906, also used as a cinema "Die Weiße
Wand". 1918 converted to a cinema (1360 seats). Destroyed by bombs 1943. After
World War II, a circus hall was built on the site for "Zirkus Cliff Aeros"
(later known as "VE Zirkus"). Later used as a television studio by DFF (also
known as "Haus der heiteren Muse"). Closed 1990. Destroyed by fire in 1991.
1999-2001 new variety theatre and entertainment complex "Krystallpalast" built
by Rainer Gottschling. The complex includes a theatre hall (190 seats), two
congress rooms, and a restaurant

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
KURHAUS BONORAND

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
MUSIKALISCHE KOMODIE
DREILINDEN

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
NEUES THEATER
Augustusplatz – Built 1864-1868. Opened 1868. 1929 alteration of orchestra pit,
installation of a rehearsal stage. 1934 alterations of entrance hall. 1935-1938
rebuilding and modernization of stagehouse. 1939 foyer restorations. Used for
opera and ballet performances of the resident municipal theatre companies.
Originally 1700 seats (+ 300 standing); 1940: 1543 seats. Destroyed by bombs
1943. Remains demolished in 1956. 1956-1960 the "Opernhaus" was built on the
site. In 1993, sculptures from the original building’s tympanon were put on
display in the park near the theatre

GERMANY – LEIPZIG – NEW OPERA HOUSE –
replacing one destroyed in 1943

GERMANY – LEIPZIG –
OPER
LEIPZIG

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
SCHAUSPIELHAUS – OLD AND NEW
– Shakespearestraße (formerly: Sophienstraße) – Built 1874 as "Carl-Theater".
Various rebuildings. 1902 renamed "Leipziger Schauspielhaus". Operated as a
private theatre. Used for drama performances. Destroyed by bombs 1943. NEW –
Bosestraße 1 – Built 1955-1956, incorporating the remains of the
"Central-Theater" (built 1901, destroyed in World War II). Opened 1957.
2003-2006 exterior renovations. Used for drama performances by the resident
company. 672 seats

GERMANY – LEIPZIG – STADTTHEATER – 1817

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
TANZKABARETT ROTE MUHLE

GERMANY – LEIPZIG-
VARIETE BATTENBERG
Tauchaer Str. 34 – Opened 1897. Renovated in summer 1900, re-opened 1900. 1200
seats. Also known as "Battenberg-Theater"

GERMANY – LEUNA –
CCE KULTURHAUS
Spergauer Straße 41a – Built 1927-1928 as "Gesellschaftshaus" for the Buna
chemical factory. Severely damaged by bombs in World War II. 1946-1947
rebuilding. Re-opened as "Feierabendhaus". 1957 extension by a fly tower.
Renamed "Klubhaus der Werktätigen ‘Walter Ulbricht’". After 1989, renamed "CCE
Kulturhaus" [= Congress Culture Event]. Used for theatre performances, concerts,
balls, exhibitions, and various other events

GERMANY – LEVERKUSEN-
FORUM LEVERKUSEN

GERMANY – LIMBACH-OBERFROHNA-
FESTHALLE

GERMANY – LIPPSTADT –
STADTTHEATER – Cappeltor
3-5 – Built 1970-1973. The complex includes the main theatre hall (787 seats)
and a studio theatre. Used as a touring venue for opera and drama performances,
and for concerts and various other events

GERMANY – LEVERKUSEN-
FORUM LEVERKUSEN

GERMANY – LUBBEN –
SPREEWALD-LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – LUBECK-
CASINO-THEATER
Beckergrube – Built 1858 as "Theater der Casino-Gesellschaft" at the site of a
previous theatre building (opened 1753, demolished ca. 1857). Opened 1858 with a
guest performance by the Schwerin court opera company. Closed 1905 due to safety
concerns. Demolished ca. 1907 in favour of the new "Stadttheater"

GERMANY – LUBECK-
STADTTHEATER
Beckergrube10-14 – Built 1907-1908 for the city of Lübeck, on the former site of
the Casino-Theater (built 1858, demolished 1907). Opened 1908. 1925 conversion
of the "Marmorsaal" hall to the chamber theatre "Kammerspiele" (325 seats).
1938-1939 interior alterations and modernization. 1951-1952 extension by a
storage tract. 1965-1966 installation of a studio stage in a former cafeteria
hall (90 seats). 1992 closed due to safety concerns. 1993-1996 major
restoration. Re-opened April 1996. Main theatre ("Großes Haus"): 920 seats. Used
for opera and drama performances by the resident companies

GERMANY – LUCKENWALDE-
STADTTHEATER
Grünstraße 14 / Theaterstraße 15a – School and theatre complex, built 1927-1930
as "Friedrich-Ebert-Schule" (1933 renamed "Hindenburgschule", 1952 renamed
"Ernst-Thälmann-Schule", 1997 re-renamed "Friedrich-Ebert-Schule") and
"Stadttheater". Theatre opened 1930. 1937-1944 home to the "Landestheater der
Mark Brandenburg". 1945-1952 used as an officers’ club by the Soviet Army.
Re-opened 1952. 1958-1970 home to the "Arbeiter- und Jugendtheater" company.
1991-1999 restorations. Used as a touring venue. 726 seats

GERMANY – LUDENSCHEID-
ZENTRAL-THEATER

GERMANY – LUDWIGSBURG-
SCHLOBTHEATER
Ludwigsburg palace, "Theaterpavillon" wing – Exterior built 1726-1730 for Duke
Eberhard Ludwig von Württemberg as part of the Ludwigsburg palace complex.
Interior built 1758-1759 as "Hoftheater". Opened 1758. 1763 installation of a
painted curtain. Closed 1775. 1811-1812 major auditorium rebuilding for King
Friedrich I. von Württemberg. Re-opened 1812. Closed 1816. Used for gala
performances ca. 1954. 1955-1962 auditorium renovations to the original 1812.
1993-1998 renovations. The original stage technology is mostly still intact.
Since the 1960s, used for opera performances by the "Ludwigsburger
Schloßfestspiele" festival. 306 seats

GERMANY – LUDWIGSHAFEN-
PFALZBAU – OLD AND NEW
Berliner Platz (formerly: Jubiläumsplatz) – Built 1928 for the UFA cinema
circuit, as a complex containing a hall for theatre and cinema, a concert hall,
and a café. Theatre and Cinema Hall: Opened 1928 (performed by the
Nationaltheater Mannheim ensemble). Subsequently used as a cinema
("Ufa-Palast"), and for weekly drama and opera performances by the
Nationaltheater Mannheim ensembles. 1374 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1943 and
1945. Not rebuilt, and finally demolished in 1957. Concert Hall: Opened 1928.
Ca. 1000 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1943 and 1945. Former foyers converted to a
cinema, provisionally re-opened 1945. 1952 installation of a new theatre hall in
the 2nd floor, used for opera and drama performances and for concerts. Closed
1969. Demolished in 1969 or the early 1970s; NEW – Berliner Straße 30 /
Kaiser-Wilhelm-Straße – Built 1968. Opened 1968 with Nationaltheater Mannheim
ensemble. The complex comprises a theatre (1174 seats), two concert halls (1088
seats and 381 seats), three function rooms and a restaurant. The theatre is
mainly used as a guest venue for opera, ballet and drama productions by touring
companies, often co-produced by the resident theatre administration. The larger
concert hall is mainly used for symphonic concerts by the Staatsphilharmonie
Rheinland-Pfalz and other orchestras. The Pfalzbau complex is also used as a
multi-purpose venue for congresses and conventions

GERMANY – LUNEBURG-
NORDLANDHALLE
Friedensstr. 16 / Bei der Ratsmühle – Multi-purpose hall. Up to 1850 seats.

GERMANY – LUNEBURG-
STADTTHEATER – An den
Reeperbahnen 3 – Built in the 1950s as "Globe-Kino" cinema. 1961 renamed
"Stadttheater", subsequently used as a theatre. Re-opened 1961. 1996-1996 major
renovations. 542 seats. Used for opera, drama and ballet performances by the
resident companies. Also used for symphonic and chamber concerts

GERMANY – LUNEN-
HEINZ-HILPERT-THEATER
Kurt-Schumacher-Straße 39 – Built 1957-1958 as "Theater der Stadt" by Gerhard
Graubner. Opened 1958. 1966 renamed "Heinz-Hilpert-Theater". 765 seats. Used as
a guest venue for opera, operetta, musical, and drama performances by touring
companies. Also used for concerts

GERMANY – MAGDEBURG –

STADTHALLE
– Kulturpark Rotehorn, Heinrich-Heine-Platz 1 – Built 1926-1927
for the "Deutsche Theaterausstellung" theatre exhibition. Opened 1927. 1928
installation of a concert organ (131 registers, ca. 10,000 pipes). Destroyed by
bombs in 1945. Subsequently rebuilt to simplified plans. Originally 3500 seats,
today 2134 seats (+ 204 seats in the smaller "Blüthnersaal")

GERMANY – MAGDEBURG –

STADTTHEATER – OLD AND NEW
– Built 1876. Opened 1876. Originally ca. 1300
seats, later ca. 1200 seats. Destroyed in World War II. NEW – Universitätsplatz
9 (formerly: Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz) – Built 1906-1907 as "Zentral-Theater".
Opened 1907 as a private variety theatre. Also used for operetta performances.
1556 seats. Destroyed by bombs 1945. 1947-1951 rebuilding to simplified plans.
Re-opened 1951. Renamed "Maxim-Gorki-Theater". 1984 reconstruction. Ca. 1990
renamed "Theater der Landeshauptstadt Magdeburg". Stagehouse destroyed by a fire
1990. 1993-1997 rebuilding and extension. Re-opened 1997. 904 seats

GERMANY – MAGDEBURG –

THEATER-AUSSTELLUNG: VERSUCHSBUHNE

GERMANY – MAGDEBURG –

WALLHALLA-THEATER

GERMANY – MAGDEBURG –

WILHELM-THEATER
– Built 1864 as "Café Français". 1870 renamed
"Wilhelm-Theater". Since 1920, operated by "Städtische Bühnen Magedburg". Closed
1929. Re-opened 1930. Destroyed by bombs in 1945.

GERMANY – MAINZ –

RHEINGOLDHALLE

GERMANY – MAINZ –

STAATSTHEATER
– Gutenbergplatz 7 – The complex comprises two theatres,
connected underground and by skywalks: Großes Haus: Built 1829-1833 as
"Stadttheater", on the site of a previous theatre ("Komödienhaus"). Opened 1833.
Ca. 1500 seats. 1863 installation of ducal proscenium boxes. 1876 auditorium
rebuilding and foyer extension. 1898-1899 technical alterations by (extension of
storage rooms, reconsruction of roof, installation of an iron curtain,
renovation of heating system). Re-opened 1899. 1910-1912 major rebuilding (front
extension by a foyer, extension by a new storey, rebuilding of stagehouse,
alterations of auditorium). 1938-1939 auditorium and foyer rebuilding,
destroying most of the 1912 decoration. Destroyed by a fire after bombings in
1942. 1950-1951 rebuilt to simplified plans. Re-opened 1951. 1977 auditorium
alterations (opera: 801 seats, drama: 887 seats), widely seen as unsatisfactory
in every respect with bad acoustics, sightlines, and low comfort. 1989 renamed
"Staatstheater". 1998-2001 major rebuilding (rebuilding of auditorium and
foyers, installation of a roof restaurant, exterior renovations). Re-opened
2001. Kleines Haus: Built 1997 by Klaus Möbius. Opened 1997. 500 seats.

GERMANY – MAINZ –

STADTHALLE
– Originally built as a multi-purpose event venue for concerts,
balls, etc. 1943-1945 used as an interim location for the Stadttheater ensemble.
Destroyed by bombs on 1945.

GERMANY – MALCHIN –

FILMBUHNE
– cinema

GERMANY – MANNHEIM –

ALTE FEUERWACHE

GERMANY – MANNHEIM –

APOLLOTHEATER

GERMANY – MANNHEIM –

NATIONAL THEATRE – OLD AND NEW
– B3, opposite the Jesuitenkirche – Built in
1776-1777 as "Comödien- und Redoutenhaus" as a rebuilding of an early 18th
century warehouse. The complex contained a theatre and a concert hall. Opened 6
Jan 1777 with Johann Christian Bock’s comedy. Subsequently used by touring
theatre companies. Re-opened 1779 as "Nationaltheater" with a permanent
ensemble. 1801 renamed "Hof- und Nationaltheater". 1853-1855 exterior and
interior rebuilding (1305 seats). 1899 electrification. 1901-1902 renovations
and modernization. 1934 rebuilding of the stagehouse. 1937 rebuilding of roof.
Destroyed by bombs 1943. Not reconstructed due to insufficent space for a modern
theatre within the 18th century building. Hence, a new "Nationaltheater" was
built in 1952 on another site at Goetheplatz. Today, the B3 quarter is a park
called "Schillerplatz", still decorated by the Friedrich Schiller monument that
had been located in front of the theatre entrance since 1862. NEW – Goetheplatz
– After the destruction of the old "Nationaltheater" in World War II, this
theatre was built on another site. Built 1955-1957 by Gerhard Weber. The complex
includes two theatres, "Großes Haus" to the right (1201 seats) and "Kleines
Haus" to the left (580-805 seats depending on chosen seating scheme), sharing a
common ground floor foyer in the middle. Opened 1957. 1989 "Großes Haus" renamed
"Opernhaus", "Kleines Haus" renamed "Schauspielhaus". 1992-1994 renovations and
addition of a second fly tower for the "Schauspielhaus".

GERMANY – MANNHEIM –

ROSENGARTEN
– Friedrichsplatz – Concert hall and congress complex, built
1899-1903 in a neo-baroque variety of Jugendstil. Originally, the complex
comprised two buildings: The "Festhalle" at the north side of the
Friedrichsplatz (containing the "Musensaal" hall, also used as "Neues Theater"
by the Nationaltheater Mannheim ensemble, up to 1390 seats) and the
"Nibelungensaal" (located behind the "Festhalle") with 3600 seats, the biggest
concert hall in Germany at the time of its opening in 1903. Destroyed by bombs
1943. Subsequently "Festhalle" exterior rebuilt to the original plans with a
mondernized interior. 1972-1974 addition of a new concert hall ("Mozartsaal",
2300 seats) on the former site of the "Nibelungensaal". The complex is currently
used as a congress centre, for classical and popular concerts, and for touring
opera, operetta and musical performances.

GERMANY – MANNHEIM –

SEEBUHNE LUISENPARK
– Open-air lake stage, built 1975 for the
"Bundesgartenschau 1975" garden exposition. Used for operetta and musical
performances and for concerts.

GERMANY – MARBURG –

FREILICHTTHEATER

GERMANY – MARL–

THEATER MARL
– Am Theater 1 / Brassertstraße / Konrad-Adenauer-Platz – Built
1953. Opened 1953 with performance by the Oberhausen theatre. From 1953, mainly
used as a cinema and for occasional theatre performances. Since 1959, used as a
guest venue for opera and drama performances by touring companies, for concerts
and for various other events. Also used for the annual "Adolf-Grimme-Preis" TV
awards presentation. 1979 rebuildings. 1997-1998 major renovation and stagehouse
extension, building of a new theatre restaurant.

GERMANY – MASSERBERG –

KULTURHAUS SCHNETT
– Built 1967

GERMANY – MEININGEN –

HOFTHEATER – 1908
– Bernhardstraße 5 – Built 1829-1831. Opened 1831.
Subsequently operated by private theatre companies. Since 1866, directed by Duke
Georg II. of Sachsen-Meiningen. Destroyed by a fire on 1908. 1908-1909, a new
"Herzogliches Hoftheater" was built on the site.

GERMANY – MEININGEN –

MEININGER THEATER
– Bernhardstraße 5 – First theatre on the site built 1831
as "Herzogliches Hoftheater". Destroyed by a fire 1908. Built 1908-1909 as
"Herzogliches Hoftheater", on the site of the previous "Herzogliches Hoftheater"
[built 1831, destroyed by fire on 5 Mar 1908]. Opened 1909. 1918 renamed
"Landestheater". 1952 installation of a revolving stage. 1990 renamed
"Südthüringisches Staatstheater". 1988-1991 extension by a functional building
(including the rehearsal and studio stage, "Georgie’s Off", 99 seats) by
Wohnungsbaukombinat Suhl. 1991 modernization of stage technology. Used for
opera, drama, and (until 2004) ballet performances by the resident companies.
Also used for concerts. 731 seats.

GERMANY – MEININGEN –

KONZERTSAAL J. BRAHMS
– Schloß Elisabethenburg – Originally built 1692 as
Schloßkirche (palace chapel). Converted to a concert hall.

GERMANY – MEININGEN –

VOLKSLICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – Meißen –

STADTTHEATER
– Theaterplatz 15 – Built 1545-1549 by as "Tuchhalle" (fabric
warehouse). Ca. 1637 war damages and rebuilding. 1851 interior rebuilding as a
theatre for the "Theaterbauverein". 1951-1957 renovations and alterations by G.
Wolf, extension by a foyer wing. 1986 interior renovations and alterations.
1991-1992 exterior renovation.

GERMANY – MEMMINGEN –

STADTTHEATER
– Theaterplatz 2 – Home to the "Landestheater Schwaben"
company. Used for drama and musical theatre performances. 406 seats.

GERMANY – MERKERS-KIESELBACH –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – MERZIG (SAAR) –

STADTHALLE

GERMANY – MINDEN –

STADTTHEATER
– Tonhallenstraße 3 – Built 1906-1908 for the city of Minden,
replacing the previous "Tonhalle" theatre. Opened 1908. 1946 damaged by flood.
1955-1956 major renovation and modernization of stage technology. 1985-1987
auditorium renovation to the original designs. Originally 700 seats, today: 572
seats. Used as a touring venue for opera and drama performances, and for
concerts and various other events.

GERMANY – MONCHENGLADBACH –

GLOBE CINEMA RHEINDAHLEN

GERMANY – MONCHENGLADBACH –

KAISER-FRIEDRICH-HALLE RHEYDT

GERMANY – MONCHENGLADBACH –

OPERNHAUS

GERMANY – MONCHENGLADBACH –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – MOORBAD LOBENSTEIN –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – MUHLHAUSEN/THUR. –

FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – MONCHENGLADBACH –

GLOBE CINEMA RHEINDAHLEN

GERMANY – MULHEIM (RUHR) –

STADTHALLE

GERMANY – MUNICH –

APOLLO-THEATER
– Variety theatre, famous for performances by Karl Valentin
and other legendary folk theatre actors of the time

GERMANY – MUNICH – BAVARIAN STATE OPERA

GERMANY – MUNICH – BAYERISCHE STAATSOPER

GERMANY – MUNICH – COURT THEATRE

GERMANY – MUNICH – CUVILLIES’ RESIDENZ THEATER
– Built 1751-1755 for Kurfürst Max III. Joseph von Bayern by François Cuvilliés.
Opened 1753 with Ferrandini’s "Catone in Utica". Originally, the theatre was
located on the grounds that are currently occupied by the new "Residenztheater",
to the left of the Nationaltheater. 1943/1944 evacuation of auditorium
decoration. 1956-1958 auditorium renovation and rebuilding into the
"Apothekenstrock" building of the Residenz palace. Addition of new foyers and
stagehouse. Re-opened 1958. Currently used for plays, opera performances and
chamber concerts by the Bayerische Staatstheater ensembles. 523 seats.

GERMANY – MUNICH –

DEUTSCHES THEATER
– Schwanthalerstraße 13 – Built 1895-1896 as a complex
including a variety theatre, a smaller hall ("Silbersaal"), restaurants, a café,
20 shops and 30 apartments – opened 1896. In 1918, briefly used as parliament by
the "Volksrat Bayern". 1939 auditorium alterations to simplified plans.
Re-opened 1939. Destroyed by bombs on 1943. 1949-1951 reconstruction to altered
plans. Re-opened 1951. 1976-1982 major rebuilding, auditorium decorated in pop
art style. Re-opened 1982 as a municipal theatre with a festive gala. Originally
1679 seats, today 1562 seats. Used for for guest performances of variety,
operetta, musical, and ballet, as well as for carnival balls – Max Reinhardt,
Ernst Lubitsch

GERMANY – MUNICH – DIE ELF SCHARFRICHTER
(Eleven Executioners) – Munich’s first cabaret – Marya Delvard; Frank Wedekind

GERMANY – MUNICH –

FREILICHTBUHNE OLYMPIAPARK

GERMANY – MUNICH – HOF-UND NATIONAL THEATRE –
1818 – burned down 1823 – rebuilt 1825 – destroyed 1943 and reopened 1963

GERMANY – MUNICH – KAMMERSPIELE – 1911 –
founded as Lustspielhaus

GERMANY – MUNICH –

KOMODIE IM BAYERISCHEN HOF
– Promenadeplatz 6, Hotel Bayerischer Hof – Built
1961. Opened 1961. 574 seats.

GERMANY – MUNICH –KUNSTLER THEATRE-
Ausstellungspark Theresienhöhe – Wooden theatre, built 1908 for the arts and
craft exposition, "Kunstgewerbeausstellung". Also known as
"Ausstellungstheater". Destroyed by bombs in 1944.

GERMANY – MUNICH –

MUNCHNER VOLKSTHEATER – OLD
– Josephspitalstraße – Built 1903 by
Gerstenecker. Ca. 1000 seats. Destroyed by bombs in World War II. The currently
operating "Volkstheater" is located in another building at another location.

GERMANY – MUNICH – NATIONAL THEATRE – 1818 –
Max-Joseph-Platz 2 – Built 1811-1818 as "Königliches Hof- und Nationaltheater" –
home of Bavarian State Opera – destroyed by a fire 1823 – restored 1823-1824
nearly unaltered – destroyed by bombs 1943. Freely reconstructed 1958-1963
re-opened 1963. 2100 seats (+ 300 standing)- largest opera house in Germany

GERMANY – MUNICH –

ODEON

GERMANY – MUNICH – OPERA FESTIVAL

GERMANY – MUNICH – PRINZREGENTEN THEATRE –
Prinzregentenplatz 12 – Built 1900-1901 as a private theatre for "Gesellschaft
Prinzregenten-Theater mbH", modelled after the Bayreuth Festspielhaus. 1938-1949
extensions. Foyers damaged by bombs in 1945. Home to the Bayerische Staatsoper
comany from 1945 until 1963. 1957-1958 reconstruction of the foyer wing.
1984-1987 renovations. Currently used for opera performances and concerts by
"Bayerische Theaterakdamie August Everding", as well as for opera performances
by the Bayerische Staatsoper and Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz opera companies,
various concerts and other events. 1122 seats.

GERMANY – MUNICH – RESIDENZ THEATRE – 1753 –
damaged WWII and restored 1958

GERMANY – MUNICH –

SCHWEIGER-THEATER
– Sonnenstraße / Karlstor – Folk theatre named after the
Schweiger family of actors and impresarios. Used by the folk theatre company
that had previously operated at the "Theater auf dem Anger" (also known as
"Lipperl-Theater" or "Kreuzertheater"). Demolished ca. 1825 in favour of the
Matthäuskirche church. In 1824, the company moved to their summer theatre on
Praterinsel. In 1830, the theatre company moved to a new theatre in Lilienstraße
in the Munich suburb of Au. Another Schweiger folk theatre opened 1848 in
Müllerstraße as "Isar-Vorstadt-Theater", operated by Josef’s nephew, Max
Schweiger, who from 1849 also led the Lilienstraße theatre. All Schweiger
theatres closed 1865 after the owners of the newly established
"Actien-Volkstheater" (Theater am Gärtnerplatz) had bought the theatre company.

GERMANY – MUNICH – STAATS THEATRE AM
GARTNERPLATZ – Gärtnerplatz 3 – Built 1864-1865 as "Actien-Volkstheater". Ca.
1900 alteration of auditorium and façade. Major alterations of the interior in
the 1920s. 1937 renovations and alterations after an attempt of closing and
demolishing the theatre. Destroyed by bombs in 1945. Rebuilding 1945-1948.
1968-1982 interior and exterior renovation to the original 1865 plans. 1999
renovations. Used for opera, operetta, musical, and ballet performances by the
resident opera and ballet companies. 940 seats.

GERMANY – MUNICH –

THEATER AUF DEM ANGER
– St.-Jakobs-Platz (formerly: Anger) – Street comedy
theatre operated by the Italian impresario, Lorenzo Lorenzoni. Famous for the
comic servant role of "Lipperl", created by Franz Maria Schweiger in 1776, hence
also known as "Lipperl-Theater". Also known as "Kreuzer-Theater" [Penny Theatre]
relating to the cheap entrance fees. Later, the company was operated by Josef
Schwaiger and moved to a newly built theatre on Sonnenstraße (see
Schweiger-Theater).

GERMANY – MUNICH – THEATER AM GARTNERPLATZ – Katharina Knie 1957;

GERMANY – MUNICH –

TONBILD-THEATER
– Cinema, built 1908 for the arts and craft exposition,
"Kunstgewerbeausstellung".

GERMANY – MUNICH –

TONHALLE
– Türkenstraße / Prinz-Ludwig-Straße – Concert hall, built as
"Kaim-Saal". Named after Franz Kaim, founder of the "Kaim’sches Philharmonisches
Orchester". Renamed "Tonhalle" in 1905. Destroyed by bombs 1944. Home to the
"Kaim’sches Philharmonisches Orchester" (1895 renamed "Kaim-Orchester", 1908
renamed "Konzertvereins-Orchester", 1924 renamed "Münchner Philharmoniker").

GERMANY – MUNSTER –

STADTTHEATER – NEW

GERMANY – MYLAU –

FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – NAUEN –

THEATER DER FREUNDSCHAFT
– Ketziner Straße 1 – Built 1955. 1977 rebuilT. The
complex includes a cinema with 380 seats, a smaller cinema/café with 42 seats,
and small exhibition gallery. Closed 1998

GERMANY – NEUBRANDENBURG –

HAUS DER KULTUR UND BILDUNG

GERMANY – NEUENSTADT AM KOCHER –

FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – NEUENKIRCHEN –

THEATER

GERMANY – NEUSS –

GLORIA-THEATER

GERMANY – NEUSS –

STADTHALLE

GERMANY – NEUSTADT AN DER WEINSTRASSE –

FREILICHTBUHNE
– Hetzelplatz – also known as "Festhalle"," Stadttheater",
"Saalbau-Lichtspiele" – Built 1873. Later rebuilding and extension. Destroyed by
fire 1980. Reconstructed 1982-1984. Re-opened 1984. Used for touring theatre
performances, concerts, congresses, and various events.

GERMANY – NEUSTADT AN DER WEINSTRASSE –

SAALBAU

GERMANY – NEUSTADT (SACHSEN) –

KARL-LIEBKNECHT-HAUS

GERMANY – NEUSTRELITZ –

LANDESTHEATER
– Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Straße – Built 1926-1928 as
"Landestheater" for the state of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, on the site of a previous
theatre (built 1776, 1824 and 1877 rebuildings, destroyed by fire in 1924).
Opened 2 June 1928. Interior destroyed by acts of war in April 1945. 1952-1954
rebuilding. Renamed "Friedrich-Wolf-Theater". After 1990, renamed "Landestheater
Mecklenburg". Used for opera and drama performances by the resident companies.
399 seats.

GERMANY – NIENBURG/WESER –

THEATER AUF DEM HORNWERK
– Mühlentorsweg 2 – Built 1989 for the city of
Nienburg. Opened 1989. Used as a guest venue for opera, operetta, musical and
drama performances by touring companies, for drama performances in local dialect
by amateur companies, for classical and popular concerts, and for congresses and
exhibitions. 626 seats.

GERMANY – NIESKY –

SCHAUBURG-LICHTSPIELE
– cinema

GERMANY – NORDHAUSEN –

STADTTHEATER
– Käthe-Kollwitz-Straße 15 – Built 1913-1917, replacing a
former theatre building (built 1882 as "Tivoli-Theater", demolished 1912).
Opened 29 September 1917. Auditorium and southern part of the theatre destroyed
by bombs in 1945. 1948-1949 rebuilding of the interior in simplified forms.
Re-opened 1949. 1990 major renovation. Originally 629 seats, today 495 seats.

GERMANY – NORDHORN –

THEATER

GERMANY – NORTHEIM –

WALDBUHNE
– Am Gesundbrunnen – Open-air theatre, built 1934-1936 as
"Freilichtbühne Niedersachsen", also known as "Weihestätte". Originally used for
Nazi "Thing" performances. After World War II renamed "Waldbühne" and used for
open-air theatre performances and popular concerts. 8000 seats.

GERMANY – NUREMBERG – FASTNACHTSSPIEL – German
carnival of 15th Century

GERMANY – NUREMBERG –

SAALBAU KULTURVEREIN

GERMANY – NUREMBERG –

STAATSTHEATER
– Richard-Wagner-Platz / Frauentorgraben / Lessingstraße –
Opernhaus: Built 1903-1905 as "Stadttheater" for the city of Nürnberg. Opened
1905. 1935-1936 interior redecoration. Damaged by bombs in 1945. Subsequently
repaired and used as a cinema and theatre for the U. S. Army. Since 1956, again
used as an opera house. Major restoration in the 1990s. 2003 renamed
"Staatstheater". 1082 seats. Used for opera and ballet performances by the
resident companies. Also used for symphonic concerts. Schauspielhaus: Built 1959
by converting an U. S. Army cinema. 1975-1976 rebuilding. Used for drama
performances by the resident company. 539 seats. Kammerspiele: studio theatre
with 197 seats.

GERMANY – OBERAMMERGAU –

PASSIONSTHEATER

GERMANY – OBERHAUSEN –

LUISE-ALBERTZ-HALLE
– Built as "Stadthalle" for the city of Oberhausen.
Later renamed in honour of the city’s mayor, Luise Albertz (1901-1979).

GERMANY – OBERHAUSEN –

THEATER – NEW
– Ebertplatz – Built 1948-1949. Opened 1949. 450 seats.

GERMANY – OBERURSEL –

FILMRAUM DER KETTELER-LAROCHE-SCHULE

GERMANY – OELSNITZ IM ERZGEBIRGE –

STADTHALLE
– Built 1955-1956 as "Kulturhaus". Later renamed "Kulturhaus Hans
Marchwitza". After 1989, renamed "Stadthalle". Used for theatre performances,
concerts, balls, and other events.

GERMANY – OELSNITZ IM VOGTLAND –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – OFFENBACH AM MAIN –

CAPITOL
– Kaiserstraße 106 / Goethestraße – Built 1912-1916 as "Neue
Synagoge". The synagogue also included a hall for lectures, theatre performances
and concerts. Severely damaged by fire during a Nazi pogrom 1938, with only the
shell remaining. In Dec 1938 bought by a cinema operator from the Jewish
community which was forced to sell the building at a ridiculously low price.
Converted to a cinema, re-opened as "National-Theater". On two nights per week,
used by the municipal authorities as a venue for touring theatre performances.
Also used for Nazi political conventions and Hitlerjugend festivities. After
World War II, a return of the large building to religious use was not seeked by
the Jewish community which agreed to a cultural use of the complex. Since 1954
used "Stadttheater" (municipal theatre) by the city of Offenbach. Used for
touring opera, operetta and drama performances, mainly by the municipal theatre
companies of Gießen and Heidelberg. 694 seats. Closed 1989 due to safety reasons
and decay. 1994-1995 rebuilt to a musical theatre for Peter Rieger Theater GmbH.
1125 seats. Re-opened as "Capitol" 1995 with the musical, "Tommy". Closed 1996.
Since 1998, operated by "Entertainment Center Rhein-Main GmbH" as ballroom, show
stage, and variety theatre.

GERMANY – OLBERNHAU –

TIVOLI

GERMANY – OLDENBURG –

STAATSTHEATER

GERMANY – OLDENBURG –

WESER-EMS-HALLE

GERMANY – OSNABRUCK –

STADTHALLE

GERMANY – OSNABRUCK –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – OTIGHEIM –

VOLKSSCHAUSPIELE

GERMANY – OYBIN –

WALDTHEATER
– Open-air forest theatre. Opened 1911. Theatre closed 1963.
Currently used by the annual "Ritterspiele" summer festival.

GERMANY – PASEWALK –

UNION FILMTHEATER

GERMANY – PASSAU –

FURSTBISCHOFLICHES OPERNHAUS
– Innstraße 4 – Built 1645 as "Ballhaus" (a
building for indoor ball games). Destroyed by fire in 1683. Subsequently
rebuilt. 1771-1774 conversion into a theatre. 1783-1786 major exterior and
interior rebuilding. Re-opened ca. 1786 as "Fürstbischöfliches Opernhaus". 1796
renovations. 1820 repainting of auditorium. 1893-1895 alterations and
renovations. 1908 electrification. 1926 installation of an iron curtain. From
the 1920s until 1945 also used as a cinema. 1959-1961 major renovation to the
original 1783 designs, renovation of the painted auduitorium decoration.
Re-opened 1961 as "Fürstbischöfliches Opernhaus". 1989-1991 renovations and
modernization of stage technology. Since the 19th century, also known as
"Stadttheaer". Originally ca. 600 seats, today 350 seats. Used for opera and
drama performances by the "Südostbayerisches Städtetheater
Passau/Landshut/Straubing" company.

GERMANY – PASSAU –

NIBELUNGENHALLE

GERMANY – PFORZHEIM –

SAALBAU

GERMANY – PFORZHEIM –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – PLAU –

NEUE FILMBUHNE

GERMANY – PLAUEN –

PARKTHEATER

GERMANY – PLAUEN –

VOGTLANDTHEATER

GERMANY – PORTA WESTFALICA –

GOETHE-FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – POTSDAM –

HANS-OTTO-THEATER

GERMANY – POTSDAM –

Schloßtheater im Neuen Palais
– inside the Southern wing of the "Neues
Palais" palace, Park Sanssouci – Built 1766-1769 for King Friedrich II. of
Prussia. 1991 renovation. 226 seats. Used for performances by the
"Hans-Otto-Theater" companies and for opera and drama performances by various
festivals.

GERMANY – PRITZWALK –

FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – PRITZWALK –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – PROBSTZELLA –

HAUS DES VOLKES
– Bahnhofstraße 25 – Built 1925-1927 as a hotel and
multi-purpose hall. Opened 1927. After World War II hotel rooms used as customs
offices, hall used for various performances and events. 1970-1971 interior
rebuildings, extension by a restaurant hall. 1995 declared a Cultural Monument.
The complex includes a hall, a restaurant, club rooms, a sauna, spas and office
spaces. 2003 bought by a private corporation.

GERMANY – PULSNITZ –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – PUTBUS –

INSELTHEATER

GERMANY – RADEBEUL –

LANDESBUHNEN SACHSEN
– Built as restaurant "Goldene Weintraube". 1950
converted to a theatre. Opened 1950 as "Landesbühnen Sachsen". 2000-2001 major
exterior and interior rebuilding. Re-opened 2001. The complex includes the main
theatre (410 seats) and a studio theatre. Used for opera, operetta , musical and
drama performances and concerts by the resident companies.

GERMANY – RALSWIEK –

NATURBUHNE DER RUGENFESTSPIELE

GERMANY – RATHEN –

FELSENBUHNE

GERMANY – RATHENOW –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – RATHENOW –

LICHTSPIELHAUS AKTIVIST
– cinema

GERMANY – RAVENSBURG –

ALTES THEATER
– Am Gespinstmarkt / Marktstraße – Built 1625 as "Brotlaube",
a municipal market hall. Ground floor arcades originally used as a market hall
by the local bakers and still in use during the weekly market on Saturday. Large
first floor hall originally also used for trading during market times. From 1698
until the 19th century used as a theatre by the local "Komödiantengesellschaft".
Currently used as municipal art gallery, "Städtische Galerie ‘Altes Theater’".

GERMANY – RAVENSBURG –

KONZERTHAUS
– Wilhelmstraße – Built 1896-1897 for "Saalbauverein AG"
Ravensburg, a society founded and funded by Julius Spohn and other citizens,
replacing the medieval wine press "Raueneggtorkel". Opened 1897. 1899 stagehouse
extended. 1938 rebuilding plans (not carried out). In the 1960s plans for a
major rebuilding or demolition, and citizens’ protest in favour of protecting
the building. 1968 renovations to the original designs (with slight alterations
of colours and some details, removal of the original Thonet chairs and
installation of modern chairs). 1980 exterior renovations. Ca. 2000 exterior
renovations to the original colours. Originally 684 seats, today 576 seats. The
Konzerthaus hides some treasures that have survived from the times of its
building, such as the original thunder, wind, and rain machinery, as well as ca.
100 painted stage sets and a painted curtain. While most of the original
machinery has not been shown for decades, some of the sets have been used in
amateur opera and school theatre performances during the 1990s. Currently used
for guest drama performances, classical concerts, wind orchestra concerts,
annual school theatre performances during the historical Rutenfest festival,
opera performances by the local music school, comedy performances, small
congresses, and carnival balls.

GERMANY – RECKLINGHAUSEN –

RUHRFESTSPIELHAUS/VCC
– Stadtgarten / Otto-Burrmeister-Allee 1 – Built
1960-1965 for the city of Recklinghausen and the federal trade union, "Deutscher
Gewerkschaftsbund". Opened 1965. 1061 seats. 2000-2001 major extension by
congress and exhibition facilities, named "VCC Vestisches Cultur- und Congress
Centrum". Used for opera, theatre, musical and ballet performances and for
concerts during the annual May/June "Ruhrfestspiele" festival. Also used for
performances, events and congresses throughout the year.

GERMANY – RECKLINGHAUSEN –

STADTISCHER SAALBAU
– Dorstener Straße 16 – Built 1897. Later rebuildings.
Since 1925, used for symphonic concerts. 1947-1964 home to the annual
"Ruhrfestspiele" festival. Closed 2000 due to safety concerns. 1500 seats

GERMANY – REGENSBURG –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – REICHENAU (SACHSEN) –

NATURBUHNE

GERMANY – REMSCHEID –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – RENDSBURG –

STADTTHEATER
– Jungfernstieg 7 – Built 1901 as "Stadthallen-Theater",
donated by the local "Sparkasse" [savings bank] to the city of Rendsburg. Also
known as "Stadthalle" or "Stadttheater". One of the homes of the
"Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landestheater" opera, drama, and ballet companies.

GERMANY – RHEINSBERG –

HECKENTHEATER
– palace gardens – Open-air garden hedge theatre, built 1758
for Prince Heinrich von Preußen. Also known as "Gartentheater" or
"Naturtheater". Still used for opera performances and concerts by the
"Musikakademie Rheinsberg" and the "Kammeroper Schloß Rheinsberg".

GERMANY – RHEINSBERG –

SCHLOßTHEATER
– Kavalierhaus – Built 1774 for Prince Heinrich von Preußen
within the "Kavalierhaus" guest house, replacing a previous theatre. Also known
as "Schauspielhaus". Used for regular seasons of opera and drama performances,
twice a week from March to November. Closed 1802 after Prince Heinrich’s death.
None of the later inhabitants of the castle ever revived the theatre. Destroyed
by a fire during the last days of World War II in 1945 when the palace district
was plundered. 1999 exterior rebuilt to the original plans, interior rebuilt as
a theatre to modern plans (300 seats). Re-opened 1999. Currently used for opera
performances and concerts by the "Musikakademie Rheinsberg" and the "Kammeroper
Schloß Rheinsberg"

GERMANY – RIESA –

FILMTHEATER CAPITOL
– cinema

GERMANY – ROSITZ –

KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – ROSTOCK –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – ROSTOCK –

THINGPLATZ

GERMANY – ROSTOCK –

VOLKSTHEATER
– Doberaner Straße 134/135 / Windmühlenstraße – Built as
concert hall "Philharmonie". 1931 renamed "Gewerkschaftshaus", subsequently used
for trade union events. Since 1943, used as a theatre by the municipal theatre
companies. 1951 renamed "Volkstheater". 1975-1977 major rebuilding. Reopened
1977. Used by the resident opera, drama, and ballet companies.

GERMANY – ROTENBURG A.D. FULDA –

LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – RUBELAND –

NATURBUHNE DER HOHLENFESTSPIELE
– Baumannshöhle – Underground cave theatre
with a medium temperature of ca. 8° C. Also known as "Goethesaal". Opened 1933.
Ca.300 seats. 1937-1939 various rebuildings of the auditorium (ca. 1000 seats).
1937-1939 used for festival performances of Bernhard Lange’s folklore play "Die
vom rauhen Lande", describing the exploration of the Baumannsöhle caves in the
16th century. 1952 revival of the festival. From 1953-1961 and again 1997 used
for theatre performances. 2001 revival of the festival.

GERMANY – RUDERSDORF –

KULTURHAUS MARTIN-ANDERSEN-NEXO

GERMANY – RUDOLSTADT –

FREILICHTBUHNE HEIDECKSBURG
– Heidecksburg castle – Open-air theatre. Used
for theatre performances by the summer festival, "Rudolstädter Festspiele".

GERMANY – RUDOLSTADT –

KULTURHAUS SCHWARZA

GERMANY – RUDOLSTADT –

STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – RUHPOLDING –

KURHAUS

GERMANY – SAARBRUCKEN –
CABARET MENZNER

GERMANY – SAARBRUCKEN –
KONGREßHALLE

GERMANY – SAARBRUCKEN –
STAATSTHEATER – OLD AND NEW
– Stengelstraße – Built 1897 as "Neues Theater". Opened 1897 with Ambroise
Thomas’s "Mignon". 841 seats. Closed ca. 1938.

GERMANY – SAARLOUIS –
THEATER AM RING
Kaiser-Friedrich-Ring / Lothringer Straße – The complex comprises a main theatre
hall (625), a studio theatre (200 seats), a festive hall (up to 400 seats), and
several function rooms. Used as a guest venue for performances by touring
companies.

GERMANY – ST. GOARSHAUSEN –
FREILICHTBUHNE LORELEY
Loreley rocks over the Rhine – Open-air theatre built in the 1930s as a
"Thingstätte" for Nazi performances. After World War II used for opera
performances and pop concerts. 4000 seats.

GERMANY – SCHIERKE –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – SCHKOPAU –
KLUBHAUS

GERMANY – SCHLEIZ –
WISENTAHAUS

GERMANY – SCHLEUSEGRUND –
KULTURHAUS BIBERSCHLAG
Biberau, Biberschlag – Built as "FDGB-Kulturhaus ‘Robert Stamm’" for the FDGB
union.

GERMANY – SCHLEUSEGRUND –
Kulturhaus Gießübel
Gießübel, Masserberger Straße – Built 1956-1957. 1964-1967 rebuildings. Also
known as "Haus der Vereine". 400 seats.

GERMANY – SCHLEUSEGRUND –
NATURTHEATER
STEINBACH/LANGENBACH

GERMANY – SCHLIERSEE-
BAUERNTHEATER
Terofalplatz – Built 1892. Opened 1892. Used by the resident amateur theatre
company "Terofals Bauerntheater" [Terofal's Farmers' Theatre] that later also
toured in Germany, Austria and in the United States (including a performance at
the New York Metropolitan Opera House in 1895). Destroyed by fire in 1947.
Subsequently rebuilt. Re-opened 1948. Closed 1958. Re-opened 21 July 1966. 1968
reconstruction of the painted curtain to the original designs. 276 seats.

GERMANY – SCHMALLENBERG –
LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – SCHMALLENBERG –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – SCHMIEDEFELD –
FILMBUHNE

GERMANY – SCHMIEDEFELD –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – SCHONEICHE BEI BERLIN –
SCHONEICHER LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – SCHWABISCH HALL –
FREILICHTSPIELE AUF DER
TREPPE

GERMANY – SCHWABISCH HALL –
NEUBAU

GERMANY – SCHWARZENBERG IM ERZGEBIRGE –
SANATORIUM ANTONSHOHE

GERMANY – SCHWARZENBERG IM ERZGEBIRGE –
THINGSTATTE

GERMANY – SCHWARZHEIDE –
FILMBUHNE

GERMANY – SCHWEDT –
UCKERMARKISCHE BUHNEN
Lindenallee (formerly: Leninallee) – Built 1978 as "Kreiskulturhaus" for the
city of Schwedt, at the former site of the Schwedt palace (destroyed in World
War II, remains demolished 1962-1969). Opened 1978. Later renamed
"Uckermärkische Bühnen Schwedt (ubs)". The complex includes two halls: "Großes
Haus" (up to 832 seats) and "Intimes Theater" (formerly "Kleiner Saal", up to
100 seats), as well as a multi-purpose foyer (up to 200 seats), and two function
rooms (30 seats each). Used for drama performances by the resident company and
various entertainment events by touring companies.

GERMANY – SCHWEINFURT –
THEATER DER STADT
Châteaudun-Park – Built 1962-1966 for the city of Schweinfurt. Opened 1966. 2002
major renovation and modernization. 750 seats (if the orchestra pit is used: 695
seats). Used as a guest venue for opera, operetta, musical and drama
performances by touring companies. Also used for classical and popular concerts.

GERMANY – SCHWERIN –
SPORT-UND KONGRESSHALLE

GERMANY – SCHWERIN –
STAATSTHEATER – Alter
Garten 2 – Built 1883-1886 as "Hoftheater" by Georg Daniel as "Hoftheater" for
Granddukes Friedrich Franz II. and Friedrich Franz III. of Mecklenburg, on the
site of a previous theatre (destroyed by a fire in 1882). Opened 1886. The
complex included a theatre and a concert hall. Ca. 1919 renamed
"Mecklenburgisches Staatstheater". 1943 conversion of concert hall into a
chamber theatre. 1964-1968 alterations of foyer decoarations. 1984-1987 stage
modernization, interior restorations, extension by a technical building.
Capacity: 650 seats (main auditorium), 240 seats (chamber theatre). Used for
opera, ballet, and drama performances by the resident companies.

GERMANY – SCHWERIN –
TONHALLE

GERMANY – SCHWETZINGEN – FESTIVALS – from 1956
in theatre in castle

GERMANY – SCHWETZINGEN –
KONZERTSAAL – Part of
the "Südlicher Zirkelbau" (built 1748-1750 after plans by Alessandro Galli da
Bibiena). Used for concerts by the "Schwetzinger Festspiele" festival.

GERMANY – SCHWETZINGEN –
NATURTHEATER – Open-air
garden theatre, built 1761 for Kurfürst Carl Theodor von der Pfalz. The theatre
consisted of a semicircular auditorium surrounded by Sphinx sculptures, an
elevated stage, and two wooden proscenium portals at each side of the
auditorium. The Apollo-Tempel façade and its grotto basement doubled as stage
background wall. Used for drama and opera performances. In 1843, the wooden
portals were destroyed by a falling tree. In the 1990s, trees were planted at
the site of the portals to convey an idea of the original design.

GERMANY – SCHWETZINGEN –
ROKOKOTHEATER – Built
1752 as "Schloßtheater”. The theatre is located behind the "Nördlicher
Zirkelbau" (built 1748-1750 after plans) that houses the foyers and is used as
the main theatre entrance. Opened 1752. 1762 extension of stage, creating a
stage of 9 m width and 38 m length (with an auditorium that is only 18 m long!),
and alterations of auditorium decoration. A door behind the stage could be opend
in order to give the spectators an even longer view into the palace gardens.
Only occasionally used after 1778 when Carl Theodor and his court moved to
München. Used as a warehouse since the late 19th century. 1937 interior
renovation and modernization of stage technology. Since then, known as
"Rokokotheater" (named after the rococo style in which the theatre is built).
1937-1942 used for a "Gaufestwochen" festival. 1943-1944 and shortly after World
War II used as an interim theatre by the Mannheim Nationaltheater company. Since
1952, used by the "Schwetzinger Festspiele" festival. 1957 new auditorium
ceiling painting. 1971-1974 modernization of stagehouse and stage technology.
Re-opened 4 May 1974. Capacity: 450 seats (for opera), 510 seats (for drama).
Currently used for baroque, classical and contempary opera performances
(including many world premieres), drama and ballet performances, and classical
concerts by the "Schwetzinger Festspiele" festival. Also used for opera
performances and concerts by the "Mozartfest" autumn festival, and as a venue
for guest opera productions and concerts throughout the year

GERMANY – SEELOW I.D. MARK –
KULTURHAUS

GERMANY – SELLIN –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – SENFTENBERG –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – SIEGEN –
APOLLO-THEATER

GERMANY – SINGEN –
FESTSPIELHALLE HOHENTWIEL

GERMANY – SOLINGEN –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – SOLINGEN –
THEATER UND KONZERTHAUS

GERMANY – SOMMERHAUSEN –
TORTURMTHEATER

GERMANY – SONDERSHAUSEN –
LANDESTHEATER

GERMANY – STRADTRODA –
KULTUR-UND VOLKSHAUS

GERMANY – Staßfurt –
STADTTHEATER

GERMANY – STEINAU A.D. STR. –
STEINAUER MARIONETTENTHEATER

GERMANY – STRALSUND –
STADTTHEATER – OLD AND NEW

GERMANY – STRAUBING –
STADTTHEATER – OLD
Currently used as a bank by Sparkasse Straubing-Bogen.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
ALTES SCHAUSPIELHAUS
Kleine Königstraße 9 – Built 1909 within seven months as a private theatre for
Stuttgarter Theaterbau AG. Opened 1909. Renovated in 1926 and, after bomb
damages, in 1946. 1946-1962 used as interim playhouse by the Staatstheater
Stuttgart company until the new Kleines Haus could be opened. Closed in 1962.
Renovation 1982-1984. Currently used as a private theatre by "Altes
Schauspielhaus und Komödie im Marquardt e. V."

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
Altes Schloß - Open-air
concert venue in the Renaissance courtyard of the Altes Schloß [Old Castle].

*GERMANY – STUTTGART – BALLET COMPANY – formed
in 1961 with John Cranko as director

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
DEUTSCHES THEATER
Heusteigstraße / Lehenstraße – Built 1898 as "Apollo-Theater" by Burkhardt and
Schmidt. Ca. 1905 renamed "Residenz-Theater". Closed in 1912, subsequently
rebuilt and used as "Lichtspielpalast" cinema. Later renamed "Deutsches
Theater". The currently operating "Apollo Theater" is another theatre located
within the SI-Centrum at Stuttgart-Möhringen.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
FRIEDRICHSBAU-THEATER – OLD
– Friedrichstraße 32 – Variety theatre, built 1900. The complex also included
shops, offices, and a café. Destroyed by bombs 1944. Finally demolished 1955 in
favour of a street. 1994 a new Friedrichsbau Varieté was built near the site of
the old theatre, forming a part of a bank office complex.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
FRIEDRICHSBAU VARIETE – NEW
– in the rotunda of the Landesbank building, Friedrichstraße 24 – Variety and
cabaret theatre, built 1994 near the site of the old Friedrichsbau-Theater
(built 1900, destroyed 1944).

*GERMANY – STUTTGART – HOFTHEATER –
Schloßplatz / Oberer Schloßgarten (at the site of today’s "Kunstgebäude") –
Built 1584 as "Neues Lusthaus" (a house for court festivities with rooms for
concerts, theatre performances, dance, and exhibitions). 1750 rebuilt into an
opera house, preserving most of the exterior building. Extensions 1752 and 1757.
1758 rebuilding. 1811 exterior rebuilding. 1845/46 rebuilding including
demolition of most of the original "Neues Lusthaus", preserving only the Western
exterior walls, a staircase and 15 arcades. Re-opened 1846 as "Hoftheater".
Destroyed by a fire in the night of 19/20 Jan 1902 that started two hours after
a performance. It is unclear if the fire was an accident or if it was started on
purpose. In any case, the fire came in handy as the old theatre was getting to
small for the needs of modern performances, which had led to many complaints by
theatre friends that a major residence city like Stuttgart should be equipped
with a proper modern court theatre. After the fire, a provisional
"Interim-Theater" was built. It was used until the new "Hoftheater" complex
could be opened in 1912. After 1902, plans to rebuild the original "Neues
Lusthaus" at its original site were not realized. However, parts of the ruin
were moved to the "Mittlerer Schloßgarten" park in 1904.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
INTERIM-THEATER
Schloßgarten (between today’s "Akademie-Garten" and "Staatstheater – Großes
Haus") – Built 1902 within 6 months by for King Wilhelm II. von Württemberg and
the city of Stuttgart. Opened 1902 with Wagner’s "Tannhäuser". 1140 seats.
Demolished ca. 1912. After a fire had destroyed the old "Hoftheater" on 20 Jan
1902, this theatre was built as a provisional home to the court theatre. It was
used until the new "Hoftheater" complex could be opened in 1912.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
LIEDERHALLE – OLD AND NEW
– Built 1863-1864 for the "Stuttgarter Liederkranz" (a choral society). Opened
1864. 1874-1875 extension by a large concert hall. 1906 rebuilding of the
entrance tract. Destroyed by bombs 1943 and 1944. 1946 provisional rebuilding of
the entrance tract and a concert hall. Later demolished in favour of the new
"Liederhalle" (built 1955-1956). NEW – Berliner Platz 1 – Built 1954-1956, at
the site of the old "Liederhalle" (destroyed in World War II). 1988-1991
extension by a new congress center building. Beethoven-Saal: Opened 1956. 1992
renovations. Used for symphonic concerts and congresses. 2000 seats.
Mozart-Saal: Opened 1956. Used for chamber concerts and congresses. 752 seats.
Slicher-Saal: Opened 1956. Used for concerts and congresses. 320 seats.
Hegel-Saal: Opened 1991. Used for concerts and congresses. 1900 seats.
Schiller-Saal: Opened 1991. Used for congresses. 460 seats.

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
METROPOL – Bolzstraße 10
– Cinema, built 1922 as "Ufa-Palast" by converting the former Stuttgart train
station (built 1844-1846, rebuilt 1863-1867). 1949 re-opened as
"Metropol-Palast". Later renamed "Palast". Re-opened 2002 as "Metropol".
Currently the complex contains three cinema halls: Metropol 1 (370 seats),
Metropol 2 (240 seats), Metropol 3 (95 seats).

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
STAATSTHEATER COMPLEX –
GROBES HAUS; KLEINES HAUS – OLD AND NEW
– Oberer Schloßgarten / Neckarstraße
– After a fire had destroyed the old "Hoftheater" on 20 Jan 1902, an
Interim-Theater was built as a provisional home to the court theatre. It was
used until this theatre complex at the former site of the "Botanischer Garten"
could be opened in 1912. After a competition in 1908, the "Großes Haus" and
"Kleines Haus" of the new "Königliche Hoftheater" were built from 1909-1912 for
the Kingdom of Württemberg . Funded by state and communal subsidies, fire
insurance of the old theatre, and the "selling" of nobility titles to rich
sponsors. Ca. 1919 renamed "Landestheater". Later renamed "Staatstheater". The
"Kleines Haus" was destroyed by bombs in World War II. Its site is today
occupied by a new "Kleines Haus" (built 1959-1962, opened 1962). Kleines Haus
(old) Built 1958-1962, on the site of the former "Staatstheater – Kleines Haus"
(built 1912, destroyed by bombs in 1944). Opened 1962. 842 seats. Used by the
resident drama company, Württembergisches Staatstheater. Built 1909-1912 as
"Königliches Hoftheater – Großes Haus" for the Kingdom of Württemberg. Opened
11912. 1946 installation of a 3rd storey studio theatre, "Kammertheater" (opened
1946; originally 400 seats, currently ca. 250 seats). Auditorium alterations in
1956 and 1970. 1983 restoration to Littmann’s original designs. Used by the
resident opera company, Württembergische Staatsoper. 1422 seats. Built 1909-1912
as "Königliches Hoftheater – Kleines Haus" by for the Kingdom of Württemberg.
Opened 1912. Ca. 1919 renamed "Landestheater – Kleines Haus". 837 seats.
Completely destroyed by bombs 1944 (stagehouse), (main façade). Remains
demolished in favour of a new "Kleines Haus" (built 1958-1962).

*GERMANY – STUTTGART – OPERA HOUSE – 1912

GERMANY – STUTTGART – PALLADIUM THEATRE –
Mamma Mia (July 2004); Wicked November 2007;

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
SI-CENTRUM – Möhringen,
Plieninger Straße 100-111 – Entertainment complex containing two theatres, a
multiplex cinema, a casino, a spa centre, a hotel, congress facilities, and
numerous restaurants and shops. Apollo Theater: Built 1993-1994 as "Musical
Hall" for Stella Musical Managment. Opened 1994 with C.-M. Schönberg’s musical
"Miss Saigon". 1999-2000 rebuilding. Re-opened 2000 with Jim Steinman’s musical,
"Tanz der Vampire". Since 2002, operated by Stage Holding. Renamed "Apollo
Theater". Used for musical performances by Stage Holding. 1784 seats. Palladium
Theater: Built 1996-1997 as "Musical Hall 2" (also known as "Musicaltheater") by
Schwarz & Schwarz for Stella Musical Managment. Opened 1995 with Alan Menken’s
musical, "The Beauty and the Beast". Since 2002, operated by Stage Holding. 2002
rebuilding. Re-opened 2002 as "Palladium Theater" with A. Lloyd Webber’s musical
"The Phantom of the Opera". Used for musical performances. 1750 seats. MaxX
Filmpalast: Multiplex cinema with six screens: MaxX 1 (305 seats), MaxX 2 (220
seats), MaxX 3 (432 seats), MaxX 4 (175 seats), MaxX 5 (170 seats), MaxX 6 (218
seats).

GERMANY – STUTTGART –
WILHELMA-THEATER – Bad
Cannstatt, Neckartalstraße 9 (Maurischer Garten Wilhelma) – Built 1839/1840 as
"Sommertheater im Rosensteinpark" (350 seats) for King Wilhelm I. of
Württemberg. Opened 1840. Renovated and rebuilt in 1900 (567 seats), 1903 (633
seats) and 1909 (726 seats). 1900-1929 used as a private theatre. After 1945,
shortly used as a cinema, later closed. 1985-1987 major reconstruction to the
original 1840 designs (349 seats), installation of a studio theatre (80 seats).
Re-opened 1987. Used by the local music and theatre college, "Hochschule für
Musik und Darstellende Kunst Stuttgart".

GERMANY – SUHL –
HAUS PHILHARMONIE

GERMANY – SUHL –
STADTHALLE

GERMANY – TECKLENBURG –
FREILICHTBUHNE

GERMANY – TEUCHERN –
THEATER DES FRIEDENS
Cinema, closed in the 1990s

GERMANY – THALE –
HARZER BERGTHEATER

GERMANY – TITISEE-NEUSTADT –
HIRSCH-LICHTSPIELE

GERMANY – TREBSEN –
FILMTHEATER

GERMANY – TREUEN –
LICHTSPIELHAUS

GERMANY – TRIER –
THEATER – Am
Augustinerhof – Built 1962-1964. Opened 1964. 622 seats. Used for opera and
drama performances by the resident companies.

GERMANY – TROSSINGEN –
DR.-ERNST-HOHNER-KONZERTHAUS

GERMANY – UBERLINGEN –
FESTSAAL

GERMANY – UBERLINGEN –
KURSAAL

GERMANY – ULM –
THEATER
Herbert-von-Karajan-Platz 1 / Olgastraße / Neutorstraße – Built 1966-1969 for
the city of Ulm. Opened 1969. Main hall: 817 seats, flexible studio stage
"Forum": up to 200 seats. Used for opera, drama, and ballet performances by the
resident companies.

GERMANY – UNTERWELLENBORN –
KULTURPALAST – Built
1952-1955 as "Kulturpalast des VEB Maxhütte ‘Johannes R. Becher’". Opened 1955.
Also known as "Kulturhaus VEB Maxhütte". The complex contains a main theatre
hall (800 seats), a chamber concert hall ("Musiksalon", 200 seats), a ballet
rehearsal room, lecture rooms, a library, various function rooms, and two
restaurants. After 1990, used as a venue for the Maxhüttenensemble theatre group
and as a furniture warehouse.




Leave a Reply